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Ultrafast Laser Sampling of a Plant Tissue and ion Conductivity Measurement for Investigation of Light Stress Generation Mechanisms

Ultrafast Laser Sampling of a Plant Tissue and ion Conductivity Measurement for Investigation of Light Stress Generation Mechanisms

Date: August 2010
Creator: Abtahi, Seyed Ali
Description: In this study we applied ultra-short laser pulses on a biological sample (Arabidopsis), in order to cut it precisely in a square pattern and subsequently use it for studying stress generation mechanisms. For this purpose, we utilized femtosecond laser pulses at 100 fs pulse width and 80 MHz repetition rate. We took two processing parameters into consideration such as laser power, laser exposure time which is related to the stage speed. Therefore, we were able to find the laser optimum conditions for ablation of biological tissues. The mutant and wildtype (control) obtained from laser cutting with a size of 500 µm × 500 µm were directly transferred (in-situ with laser cutting) into a microfabricated chamber containing ~500 nanoliters deionized water for measuring ion conductivity. The ion conductivity is a signature of cell-death mechanisms caused by various stresses. A light with intensity of 100 µmol was exposed to the samples for 2 hours and 20 minutes as a source of stress. A quantitative electrical analysis with high accuracy was assured by utilizing a microchamber, which enables a measurement in nanoliter volume. We measured the impedance which is reciprocal of conductivity using a lock-in amplifier and a precise current source at frequency ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Expression analysis of the fatty acid desaturase 2-4 and 2-3 genes from Gossypium hirsutum in transformed yeast cells and transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

Expression analysis of the fatty acid desaturase 2-4 and 2-3 genes from Gossypium hirsutum in transformed yeast cells and transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

Date: August 2008
Creator: Zhang, Daiyuan
Description: Fatty acid desaturase 2 (FAD2) enzymes are phosphatidylcholine desaturases occurring as integral membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and convert monounsaturated oleic acid into polyunsaturated linoleic acid. The major objective of this research was to study the expression and function of two cotton FAD2 genes (the FAD2-3 and FAD2-4 genes) and their possible role in plant sensitivity to environmental stress, since plants may increase the polyunsaturated phospholipids in membranes under environmental stress events, such as low temperature and osmotic stress. Two FAD2 cDNA clones corresponding to the two FAD2 genes have been isolated from a cotton cDNA library, indicating both genes are truly expressed in cotton. Model yeast cells transformed with two cotton FAD2 genes were used to study the chilling sensitivity, ethanol tolerance, and growth rate of yeast cells. The expression patterns of the two FAD2 genes were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and Western blot analyses in cotton plants under different treatment conditions. The coding regions of both FAD2 genes were inserted downstream from the CaMV 35S promoter in the pMDC gateway binary vector system. Five different FAD2/pMDC constructs were transformed into the Arabidopsis fad2 knockout mutant background, and multiple potential transgenic Arabidopsis plant ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
MATE Transporters Facilitate Vacuolar Uptake of Epicatechin 3'-O-Glucoside for Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis

MATE Transporters Facilitate Vacuolar Uptake of Epicatechin 3'-O-Glucoside for Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis

Date: August 2009
Creator: Zhao, Jian & Dixon, R. A.
Description: Article discussing how MATE transporters facilitate vacuolar uptake of epicatechin 3'-O-glucoside for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Signal-transduction pathways controlling light-regulated development in Arabidopsis

Signal-transduction pathways controlling light-regulated development in Arabidopsis

Date: October 30, 1995
Creator: Chory, Joanne; Cook, R. K.; Dixon, R. A.; Elich, Tedd; Li, H. M.; Lopez, E. et al.
Description: Article on signal-transduction pathways controlling light-regulated development in Arabidopsis.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
CUE1: A Mesophyll Cell-Specific Positive Regulator of Light-Controlled Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

CUE1: A Mesophyll Cell-Specific Positive Regulator of Light-Controlled Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Li, Hsou-min; Culligan, Kevin M.; Dixon, R. A. & Chory, Joanne
Description: Article on CUE1 and a mesophyll cell-specific positive regulator of light-controlled gene expression in Arabidopsis.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994]

Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994]

Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Marton, L.
Description: This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Signal transduction regulating meristem development in Arabidopsis. Final report

Signal transduction regulating meristem development in Arabidopsis. Final report

Date: September 10, 2003
Creator: Cark, Steven E.
Description: Research support by DE-FG02-96ER20227 focused on the CLV loci and their regulation of organ formation at the Arabidopsis shoot meristem. Shoot meristem function is central to plant development as all of the above-ground organs and tissues of the plant are derived post-embryonically from the shoot meristem. At the shoot meristem, stem cells are maintained, and progeny cells undergo a switch toward differentiation and organ formation. The CLV loci, represented by three genes CLV1, CLV2 and CLV3 are key regulators of meristem development. Each of the CLV loci encode a putative receptor-mediated signaling component. When this work began, virtually nothing was known about receptor-mediated signaling in plants. Thus, our goal was to both characterize these genes and the proteins they encode as regulators of meristem development, and to investigate how receptor-mediated signaling might function in plants. Our work lead to several major publications that were significant contributions to understanding this system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final Report [Function of the Arabidopsis TIR1 gene in auxin response]

Final Report [Function of the Arabidopsis TIR1 gene in auxin response]

Date: December 18, 2000
Creator: Estelle, Mark
Description: During this grant period substantial progress was made in the characterization of the TIR1 gene in Arabidopsis. Studies showed that the TIR1 protein is part of a protein complex that includes AtCUL1, ASK1 and RBX1. This complex, called SCF-TIR1, functions in the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway. Our work is the first report of an SCF complex in a plant system. The results of our studies are described in more detail in the report together with a publication resulting from this study.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thalian. Final report

A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thalian. Final report

Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: Gibson, S. I.
Description: This is a final report describing the results of the research funded by the DOE Energy Biosciences Program grant entitled ''A Molecular-Genetic Approach to Studying Source-Sink Interactions in Arabidiopsis thaliana''.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Minorsky, Peter V.
Description: The symposium ''Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, Systems-Based Approaches'' was held January 15-18, 2003 at the Riverside Convention Center in Riverside, California. The host organization for the symposium was the Center for Plant Cell Biology (CEPCEB) at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). The meeting, focusing on systems-based approaches to plant cell biology research, was the first of this kind in the field of plant biology. The speakers and nearly 100 posters placed emphasis on recent developments in plant cellular biology and molecular genetics, particularly those employing emerging genomic tools, thereby sharing the most current knowledge in the field and stimulating future advances. In attendance were many well-established scientists and young investigators who approach plant cell biology from different but complementary conceptual and technical perspectives. Indeed, many disciplines are converging in the field of cell biology, producing synergies that will enable plant scientists to determine the function of gene products in the context of living cells in whole organisms. New, cross-disciplinary collaborations, as well as the involvement of computer scientists and chemists in plant biology research, are likely additional outcomes of the symposium. The program included 39 invited session speakers and workshop/panel speakers. Sessions were convened on ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Toward an Integrated BAC Library Resource for Genome Sequencing and Analysis

Toward an Integrated BAC Library Resource for Genome Sequencing and Analysis

Date: February 26, 2002
Creator: Simon, M. I. & Kim, U.-J.
Description: We developed a great deal of expertise in building large BAC libraries from a variety of DNA sources including humans, mice, corn, microorganisms, worms, and Arabidopsis. We greatly improved the technology for screening these libraries rapidly and for selecting appropriate BACs and mapping BACs to develop large overlapping contigs. We became involved in supplying BACs and BAC contigs to a variety of sequencing and mapping projects and we began to collaborate with Drs. Adams and Venter at TIGR and with Dr. Leroy Hood and his group at University of Washington to provide BACs for end sequencing and for mapping and sequencing of large fragments of chromosome 16. Together with Dr. Ian Dunham and his co-workers at the Sanger Center we completed the mapping and they completed the sequencing of the first human chromosome, chromosome 22. This was published in Nature in 1999 and our BAC contigs made a major contribution to this sequencing effort. Drs. Shizuya and Ding invented an automated highly accurate BAC mapping technique. We also developed long-term collaborations with Dr. Uli Weier at UCSF in the design of BAC probes for characterization of human tumors and specific chromosome deletions and breakpoints. Finally the contribution of our work ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final Technical Report

Final Technical Report

Date: June 28, 2005
Creator: Browning, Karen S.
Description: The long term goal of this laboratory is to elucidate a detailed molecular description of the process of initiation of protein synthesis and its regulation. The specific goals of the project were: (1) development of an in vivo [{sup 32}P]- and/or [{sup 35}S]-labeling system for proteins using Arabidopsis suspension cells; (2) develop an in vitro protein synthesis assay from Arabidopsis suspension cells; (3) develop an assay for locating Arabidopsis kinases that phosphorylate the initiation factors; and (4) begin to identify Arabidopsis kinases that are involved in phosphorylation of the initiation factors.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
STI. DE-FG02-00ER1505 [Brief summary of 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research]

STI. DE-FG02-00ER1505 [Brief summary of 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research]

Date: June 24, 2000
Creator: unknown
Description: The 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held in Madison, Wisconsin, June 24 through June 28, 2000. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the subject of genetic study for many years. However, during the last decade, the number of research laboratories using Arabidopsis as a model system has increased tremendously, and Arabidopsis is currently being used to study all aspects of plant biology. The rapid rate of progress in Arabidopsis research, including the completion of the genomic sequence, underscores the usefulness of holding a meeting every year. These conferences provide an important opportunity for the Arabidopsis community to interact and exchange information. The meeting opened with an evening keynote address on the global impact of plant biology, delivered by Richard Jefferson, the Executive Director of CAMBIA (Center for the Application of Molecular Biology to International Agriculture). This was followed by short updates from each of the NSF-funded Plant Genome groups. Many of these groups are carrying out projects that impact the Arabidopsis community. Each of the 17 platform sessions consisted of talks from two invited speakers followed by two short talks that were chosen from the submitted poster abstracts. A concerted effort was made to invite junior investigators, including graduate students ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Final report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1998

A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Final report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1998

Date: November 1998
Creator: Gibson, S. I.
Description: The ultimate goal of this research is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which the complex interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are controlled in plants. As soluble sugar levels have been shown to play a vital role in a variety of source-sink interactions, a key aspect of the authors research is to determine the role of sugar-regulated gene expression in mediating source-sink interactions. In addition, as a critical aspect of source-sink interactions is the channeling of fixed carbon into different storage forms, they have pursued the findings that fumaric acid represents a significant form of storage carbon in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. In the future, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are coordinated will be a pre-requisite to developing more rationale approaches to improving harvest indices in crop species.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Genetic analysis of embryo dormancy. Final report

Genetic analysis of embryo dormancy. Final report

Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Galau, G.
Description: Primary dormancy is the inability of mature seed to immediately germinate until specific environmental stimuli are perceived that predict that future conditions will support plant growth and seed set. The analysis of abscisic acid deficient and insensitive mutants, in particular in Arabidopsis, suggests that embryo abscisic acid may be directly involved in the development of primary dormancy. Other studies implicate the continued accumulation of LEA proteins as inhibiting germination in dormant embryos. The results of these physiological, molecular and genetic approaches are complex and equivocal. There is a real need for approaches that test the separate nature of vivipary inhibition and primary dormancy and deliberately seed to decouple and dissect them. These approaches should be of help in understanding both late embryo development and primary dormancy. The approach taken here is to directly isolate mutants of Arabidopsis that appear to be deficient only in primary dormancy, that is fresh seed that germinate rapidly without the normally-required cold-stratification. The authors have isolated at least 8 independent, rapidly germinating RGM mutants of Arabidopsis. All others aspects of plant growth and development appear normal in these lines, suggesting that the rgm mutants are defective only in the establishment or maintenance of primary dormancy. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Controlled production of cellulases in plants for biomass conversion. Annual report, March 11, 1997--March 14, 1998

Controlled production of cellulases in plants for biomass conversion. Annual report, March 11, 1997--March 14, 1998

Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Danna, K.J.
Description: The goal of this project is to facilitate conversion of plant biomass to usable energy by developing transgenic plants that express genes for microbial cellulases, which can be activated after harvest of the plants. In particular, the feasibility of targeting an endoglucanase and a cellobiohydrolase to the plant apoplast (cell wall milieu) is to be determined. To avoid detrimental effects of cellulose expression in plants, enzymes with high temperature optima were chosen; the genes for these enzymes are from thermophilic organisms that can use cellulose as a sole energy source. During the past year (year 2 of the grant), efforts have been focused on testing expression of endoglucanase E{sub 1}, from Acidothermus cellulolyticus, in the apoplast of both tobacco suspension cells and Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using the plasmids constructed during the first year, transgenic cells and plants that contain the gene for the E{sub 1} catalytic domain fused to a signal peptide sequence were obtained. This gene was constructed so that the fusion protein will be secreted into the apoplast. The enzyme is made in large quantities and is secreted into the apoplast. More importantly, it is enzymatically active when placed under optimal reaction conditions (high temperature). Moreover, the plant ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Controlled production of cellulases in plants for biomass conversion. Progress report, June 15, 1996--March 10, 1997

Controlled production of cellulases in plants for biomass conversion. Progress report, June 15, 1996--March 10, 1997

Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Danna, K.J.
Description: The goal of this project is to facilitate conversion of plant biomass to usable energy by developing transgenic plants that express genes for microbial cellulases, which can be activated after harvest of the plants. In particular, we want to determine the feasibility of targeting an endoglucanase and a cellobiohydrolase to the plant apoplast (cell wall milieu). The apoplast not only contains cellulose, the substrate for the enzymes, but also can tolerate large amounts of foreign protein. To avoid detrimental effects of cellulase expression in plants, we have chosen enzymes with high temperature optima; the genes for these enzymes are from thermophilic organisms that can use cellulose as a sole energy source.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Genome sequencing and analysis conferences. Progress report, August 15, 1993--August 15, 1994

Genome sequencing and analysis conferences. Progress report, August 15, 1993--August 15, 1994

Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Venter, J.C.
Description: The 14 plenary session presentations focused on nematode; yeast; fruit fly; plants; mycobacteria; and man. In addition there were presentations on a variety of technical innovations including database developments and refinements, bioelectronic genesensors, computer-assisted multiplex techniques, and hybridization analysis with DNA chip technology. This document includes only the session schedule.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Chory, Joanne
Description: The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

Date: January 16, 2006
Creator: Chory, Joanne
Description: The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Regulation of polyamine synthesis in plants. Annual progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

Regulation of polyamine synthesis in plants. Annual progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Malmberg, R.L.
Description: After isolation of a cDNA clone for the plant ARGdc, this research focused on unusual post-translational modifications occuring in a arginine decarboxylase cDNA clone in oats. A novel regulatory mechanism for polyamines was explored and an attempt was made to characterize it. A plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA was identified in Arabidopsis. Further work remains on the mechanisms of polyamine regulation and function in plants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Regulation of polyamine synthesis in plants. Final progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1994

Regulation of polyamine synthesis in plants. Final progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1994

Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Malmberg, R.L.
Description: This research focused on unusual post-translational modifications occuring in a arginine decarboxylase cDNA clone in oats. A novel regulatory mechanism for polyamines was explored and an attempt was made to characterize it. A plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA was identified in Arabidopsis. Further work remains on the mechanisms of polyamine regulation and function in plants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

Date: October 1, 2000
Creator: Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D. & Gibson, S.I.
Description: Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

Date: October 11, 2000
Creator: Somerville, Chris R. & Scieble, Wolf
Description: Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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