Fear of Developing Dementia

Fear of Developing Dementia

Date: February 28, 2013
Creator: Page, Kyle S.; Hayslip, Bert & Wadsworth, Dee
Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on Alzheimer's disease and dementia. The presenter discusses his research into the fear of dementia.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
UNT Speaks Out on Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia

UNT Speaks Out on Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia

Date: February 28, 2013
Creator: Lawrence, Samantha
Description: This poster introduces the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia. This series features Dr. Meharvan Singh, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Neurosciencea at the UNT Health Science Center, Dr. Bert Hayslip, regents professor in the Department of Psychology, and Kyle Page, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
"The Long Goodbye": Uncertainty Management in Alzheimer's Caregivers

"The Long Goodbye": Uncertainty Management in Alzheimer's Caregivers

Date: May 2011
Creator: Shaunfield, Sara
Description: Caregivers for individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) shoulder a remarkably complex burden as compared to other caregivers of elderly individuals. For long distance caregivers, geographical separation further compounds the problems experienced by AD caregivers, as they are isolated from family members and support networks. Both on-site and long-distance AD caregivers experience uncertainty; the findings from this study illustrate how AD caregivers manage the uncertainty of the disease and primary care, as well as how uncertainty differs between on-site and long-distance caregivers. AD caregiver (N = 13) interviews were transcribed and qualitatively analyzed using uncertainty management theory as a thematic lens. The analysis revealed that AD caregivers experience overwhelming feelings of burden, guilt, and doubt; however, these feelings manifest differently depending on caregiver type. The findings of this study demonstrate that sources for obtaining information regarding AD and caregiving were useful for on-site caregivers; however, the sources did not account for the needs of long-distance caregivers or the psychosocial needs of on-site caregivers. Furthermore, AD caregivers did not seek support or information about AD and caregiving from health care professionals. Implications for future research regarding long-distance and on-site AD caregiving are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Risk Factors for Vascular Dementia

Risk Factors for Vascular Dementia

Date: May 2005
Creator: Cornett, Patricia F.
Description: Dementia is a devastating disorder that commonly affects people over the age of 65. Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are the most common forms of dementias. A number of studies have implicated cardiovascular risks as important factors in the development of dementia. These risks include high-risk behaviors such as smoking and risks related at least partially to health behaviors such as diet and exercise. This study examines a group of cardiovascular risk factors, as defined by the Framingham study, to ascertain if they are predictors of dementia. A retrospective chart review of 481consecutive patients seen in a geriatric medicine clinic produced a sample of 177 individuals diagnosed with dementia and 304 individuals without a dementia diagnosis. Relative risk ratio (RRR) results indicate that a history of hypertension (RRR= 1.80, p = .009) and a history of hypercholesterolemia (RRR = 1.85, p = .016) are significant predictors of Alzheimer's disease. A history of tobacco use (RRR = 2.18, p = .01) is a significant predictor of vascular dementia. Stepwise regression analyses indicate that hypercholesterolemia is an independent predictor of dementia (b = -.113, p = .009) and hypercholesterolemia (b = -.104, p = .018) and hypertension (b = -.094, p = ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Caring for Yourself as a Caregiver

Caring for Yourself as a Caregiver

Date: February 28, 2013
Creator: Hayslip, Bert
Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia. In this presentation, Bert Hayslip, Regents Professor in the Department of Psychology, will discuss caregiving for Alzheimer's and dementia patients.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Brain-Targeted Proanthocyanidin Metabolites for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

Brain-Targeted Proanthocyanidin Metabolites for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

Date: April 11, 2012
Creator: Wang, Jun; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Ho, Lap; Blount, Jack W.; Janle, Elsa M.; Gong, Bing et al.
Description: Article on brain-targeted proanthocyanidin metabolites for Alzheimer's disease treatment.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Alzheimer's Disease: How to Treat it: A Work in Progress

Alzheimer's Disease: How to Treat it: A Work in Progress

Date: April 2, 2009
Creator: Parker, Neeka & Eve, Susan Brown
Description: Poster presented at the 2009 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas. This poster discusses research on Alzheimer's disease and how to treat it. The presenters conducted a meta-analysis on data about available treatments to see which one is the most effective in alleviating or reversing the symptoms.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Alzheimer's Disease and Potential Benefit of Music Therapy: A Work in Progress

Alzheimer's Disease and Potential Benefit of Music Therapy: A Work in Progress

Date: April 15, 2010
Creator: Noll, Lindy & Eve, Susan Brown
Description: Poster presentation for the 2010 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas. This poster discusses a research project on Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the potential benefit of music therapy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
A Study of Alzheimer's Disease in Texas Counties

A Study of Alzheimer's Disease in Texas Counties

Date: April 3, 2008
Creator: Emadiazar, Natalie & Oppong, Joseph R.
Description: Presentation for the 2008 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas discussing a study of Alzheimer's disease in Texas counties.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Effectiveness of the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination in Assessing Alzheimer's Disease

Effectiveness of the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination in Assessing Alzheimer's Disease

Date: December 1996
Creator: Begnoche, Normand B.
Description: Accurate, early diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease is becoming increasingly important in light of its growing prevalence among the expanding older-aged adult population. Due to its ability to assess multiple domains of cognitive functioning and provide a profile of impairment rather than a simple global score, the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination (NCSE) is suggested to better assess such patterns of cognitive deficit for the purpose of diagnosis. The performance of the NCSE was compared with that of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for diagnostic sensitivity in a sample of patients diagnosed as having probable Alzheimer's Disease. The strength of correlation between severity of cognitive impairment on these tests and report of behavior problems on the Memory and Behavior Problems Checklist (MBPC) was also explored, as was performance on the NCSE and report of behavior problems using the MBPC in predicting Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) scan results. The NCSE was found to exhibit greater sensitivity to physician diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's Disease relative to two versions (Serial 7's or WORLD) of the MMSE (.90, .77 and .68, respectively). While both measures were found to correlate significantly with the report of behavior problems, only a moderate proportion (NCSE = .22 and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effectiveness of the Geriatric Depression Scale to Distinguish Apathy From Depression in Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias.

The Effectiveness of the Geriatric Depression Scale to Distinguish Apathy From Depression in Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias.

Date: August 2008
Creator: Davis, Tommy E., Jr.
Description: Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias in the elderly is critical for improving treatment methods and is a necessary component for improving public health interventions. One of the earliest and most common behavioral syndromes of AD is apathy and is associated with executive dysfunction. Apathy in AD is often misdiagnosed as depression due to an overlap in symptoms. Studies that have found depression to be associated with executive dysfunction have not always controlled for the presence of apathy. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is a widely used instrument designed to assess depression in the elderly. This study utilized the GDS and a set of standard neuropsychological instruments to investigate the relationship between apathy, depression, and executive functions in individuals with AD and related dementias. The first objective of this study was to determine if apathy has a greater impact on executive functions compared to depression in AD and related dementias. The second objective was to determine the effectiveness of the GDS as a screen for apathy. The results of the analyses did not support the hypotheses. However, exploratory analyses suggested a possible non-linear relationship with apathy and various levels of dementia severity. Exploratory analysis also suggested mean ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Alert Systems for Missing Adults in Eleven States: Background and Issues for Congress

Alert Systems for Missing Adults in Eleven States: Background and Issues for Congress

Date: May 7, 2009
Creator: Fernandes, Adrienne L. & Colello, Kirsten J.
Description: This report discusses the emerging development of nationwide alert systems to recover missing adults, such as those with mental impairment (such as Alzheimer's disease), developmental disabilities, or suicidal tendencies. This report provides an overview of such alert systems in 11 states: Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Texas, and Virginia. This report also provides a discussion of issues for Congress to consider with respect to the federal role, if any, in developing state alert programs for missing adults.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Alzheimer's Disease and Attention: An Investigation into the Initial Stage of Information Processing

Alzheimer's Disease and Attention: An Investigation into the Initial Stage of Information Processing

Date: August 1990
Creator: Houtz, Andrew W. (Andrew William)
Description: This study explores the possibility that attentional deficits are an early clinical symptom of Alzheimer's disease. The three goals are to demonstrate that individuals with Alzheimer's disease are impaired on tasks of attentional processing, to compare the sensitivity of currently used measures of attention to attentional dysfunction, and to compare the behavioral response styles (errors of commission) of Alzheimer's disease subjects and non-impaired subjects. The subjects were 22 males and 46 females with a mean age of 70.76 years. Thirty-six had the presumptive diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease; 18 were identified as mildly impaired and 18 as moderately impaired on the Cognitive Capacity Screening Examination. The remaining 32 subjects comprised the non-impaired control group. Five measures of attention were administered to all participants: the Digit Span Subtest of the WAIS-R, the Seashore Rhythm Test of the Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Battery, the Vigilance and Distractibility tasks of the Gordon Diagnostic System, and the Concentration/Interference task. The results show a significant difference in attentional processing between normal (non-impaired) subjects and subjects diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. All measures of attention used in this study, except the Concentration/Interference task, differentiated normal subjects from moderately impaired Alzheimer's disease subjects. The Digit Span Subtest and the Seashore Rhythm ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Relationship Between Neuropsychological Performance and Daily Functioning in Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease

The Relationship Between Neuropsychological Performance and Daily Functioning in Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease

Date: May 2000
Creator: Tomaszewski, Sarah
Description: The results of neuropsychological tests are often used by clinicians to make important decisions regarding a demented patient's ability to competently and/or independently perform activities of daily living. However, the ecological validity of most neuropsychological instruments has yet to be adequately established. The current study examined the relationship between neuropsychological test performance and functional status in 42 individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease. A comprehensive battery of cognitive tests was employed in order to assess a wide range of neuropsychological abilities. Functional status was measured through the use of both a performance-based scale of activities of daily living (The Direct Assessment of Functional Status; Loewenstein et al., 1989) as well as by a caregiver/informant-based rating scale (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living; Lawton & Brody, 1969). Findings suggest that neuropsychological functioning is moderately predictive of functional status. Memory performance was the best predictor of functional status in most ADL domains, followed by executive functioning and visuospatial abilities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Blood-Based Biomarkers: A blood screening test for Alzheimer's disease

Blood-Based Biomarkers: A blood screening test for Alzheimer's disease

Date: June 25, 2016
Creator: O'Bryant, Sid E.; Edwards, Melissa; Johnson, Leigh A.; Hall, James R.; Villarreal, Alcibiades E.; Britton, Gabrielle B. et al.
Description: This article describes the first-ever multiethnic referent sample that spans community-based and clinic-based populations for implementation of an Alzheimer's disease blood screen.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences