Augeries, for Flute, Clarinet, Percussion and Tape: Aesthetic Discussion and Theoretical Analysis

Augeries, for Flute, Clarinet, Percussion and Tape: Aesthetic Discussion and Theoretical Analysis

Date: May 2009
Creator: Gedosh, David
Description: Augeries is a multi-channel electro-acoustic composition for flute, clarinet, percussion, and tape. It is intended to be diffused through an 8-channnel playback system. Inspired by the first four lines of William Blake's Augeries of Innocence, Augeries captures the qualitative aspects of Blake's poetry by presenting the listener with an equally aperspectival aesthetic experience. The small-scale structure reflected on the large-scale form - the infusion of vastness and expansiveness into the fragile and minute. Augeries incorporates techniques of expansion and contraction, metonymic relationships, dilation and infolding of time, and structured improvisation to create an experience that is designed to explore the notion of musical time, and to bring to the listener the sense of time freedom. The critical analysis suggests that the increase in the notions of musical time, the aesthetics with which they conform, and the new time forms created, encapsulate communicative significance. This significance exists within a horizon of meaning. Semiotics illuminates an understanding of the structuring techniques used to render time as an area of artistic play. Understanding the aesthetics and mechanisms through which these techniques can be used constitutes a shared horizon of meaning. The concepts of cultural phenomenologist Jean Gebser, as explicated in The Ever-Present Origin, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Accessing the Power of Aesthetics in Human-computer Interaction

Accessing the Power of Aesthetics in Human-computer Interaction

Date: August 2013
Creator: Chenyan, Xu
Description: In information systems design there are two schools of thought about what factors are necessary to create a successful information system. The first, conventional view holds that system performance is a key, so that efficiency characteristics such as system usability and task completion time are primary concerns of system designers. The second, emerging view holds that the visual design is also the key, so that visual interface characteristics such as visual appeal, in addition to efficiency characteristics, are critical concerns of designers. This view contends that visual design enhances system use. Thus, this work examines the effects of visual design on computer systems. Visual design exerts its influence on systems through two mechanisms: it evokes affective responses from IT users, such as arousal and pleasure and it influences individuals’ cognitive assessments of systems. Given that both affective and cognitive reactions are significant antecedents of user behaviors in the IT realm, it is no surprise that visual design plays a critical role in information system success. Human-computer-interaction literature indicates that visual aesthetics positively influences such information success factors as usability, online trust, user satisfaction, flow experience, and so on. Although academic research has introduced visual design into the Information Systems (IS) ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp

A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp

Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Siminovitch, M.; Gould, C. & Page, E.
Description: High-lumen light sources represent unique challenges and opportunities for the design of practical and efficient interior lighting systems. High-output sources require a means of large-scale distribution and avoidance of high-luminance glare while providing efficient delivery. An indirect lighting system has been developed for use with a 1,000 Watt sulfur lamp that efficiently utilizes the high-output source to provide quality interior lighting. This paper briefly describes the design and initial testing of this new system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Hedonic travel cost and random utility models of recreation

Hedonic travel cost and random utility models of recreation

Date: July 9, 1998
Creator: Pendleton, L.; Mendelsohn, R. & Davis, E.W.
Description: Micro-economic theory began as an attempt to describe, predict and value the demand and supply of consumption goods. Quality was largely ignored at first, but economists have started to address quality within the theory of demand and specifically the question of site quality, which is an important component of land management. This paper demonstrates that hedonic and random utility models emanate from the same utility theoretical foundation, although they make different estimation assumptions. Using a theoretically consistent comparison, both approaches are applied to examine the quality of wilderness areas in the Southeastern US. Data were collected on 4778 visits to 46 trails in 20 different forest areas near the Smoky Mountains. Visitor data came from permits and an independent survey. The authors limited the data set to visitors from within 300 miles of the North Carolina and Tennessee border in order to focus the analysis on single purpose trips. When consistently applied, both models lead to results with similar signs but different magnitudes. Because the two models are equally valid, recreation studies should continue to use both models to value site quality. Further, practitioners should be careful not to make simplifying a priori assumptions which limit the effectiveness of both ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 5, Appendices J-M

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 5, Appendices J-M

Date: July 1, 1999
Creator: Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A. et al.
Description: In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Trettin, L.D.; Petrich, C.H. & Saulsbury, J.W.
Description: This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of the potential for a coal-fired power plant to cause visibility impairment in a National Park

Analysis of the potential for a coal-fired power plant to cause visibility impairment in a National Park

Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Richards, L.W. & Miller, R.L.
Description: The visibility analysis examined potential impacts of the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP), a proposed 50-MW coal-fired power plant to be built adjacent to the existing 25-MW Healy Unit 1 (a conventional pulverized-coal unit) in Healy, Alaska, about 6 km north of Denali National Park. The analysis used the PLUVUE I visibility model to calculate ambient concentrations of species in the plume with potential to cause visible effects. The optical effects were determined in separate calculations when the sun was within about 10 {degree} of the horizon, in the winter. Results indicated that almost all the potential impact would be caused by NO{sub x}. Analysis of the number of daytime hours per year that the HCCP plume would be perceptible from the Visitor Access Center, shows that the predicted number of hours is extremely low for the base case: 2 hours for the north sight path, 2 hours for the south sight path, and a total of 2 hours. Sensitivity analysis shows more sensitivity to changing the perceptibility threshold than extending the sight paths. Cumulative visibility impacts of air emissions resulting from the simultaneous operation of the HCCP and Healy Unit No. 1 were also evaluated; results show that the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Progress on linking gender and sustainable energy

Progress on linking gender and sustainable energy

Date: April 5, 2000
Creator: Farhar, B.
Description: The field of gender and energy has been identified as critical in global sustainable energy development and is increasingly important to decision makers. The theme of women and energy was of significance at the 1998 World Renewable Energy Congress in Florence, Italy. This paper traces further developments in this field by summarizing selected programmatic initiatives, meetings, and publications over the past 18 months.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Towards breaking the silence between the two cultures: Engineering and the other humanities

Towards breaking the silence between the two cultures: Engineering and the other humanities

Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Prausnitz, John M.
Description: Over the years, I have attended numerous meetings like this one at the Center for the Study of Higher Education. I have noticed that most of the attendees, and certainly the speakers, tend to come from the social sciences or humanities. Only rarely do I see anyone here from Berkeley's College of Chemistry or College of Engineering. I come from the College of Chemistry that includes Berkeley's Department of Chemical Engineering. I mention this background to indicate that my remarks here are necessarily less abstract, less theoretical and less philosophical than those of most previous seminar speakers. My remarks are probably somewhat simplistic because, as a result of my engineering background, I tend to focus less on generalities and principles, giving more attention to possible solutions of limited practical problems. About seven weeks ago, I was invited to attend a conference sponsored by the Berlin Academy of Sciences where ''Sciences'' is not confined to natural sciences but includes also humanities and social sciences. The topic of the Conference was ''Sprachlosigkeit'', a German word that roughly translated means inability to speak. The subtitle was ''Silence Between the Disciplines''. The German universities are worried about the increasing gulf between what is often ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Integrating ducts into the conditioned space: Successes and challenges

Integrating ducts into the conditioned space: Successes and challenges

Date: May 1, 2004
Creator: Siegel, Jeffrey & Walker, Iain
Description: In residential and light commercial construction in the United States, heating and cooling ducts are often located outside the thermal or pressure boundary of the conditioned space. This location is selected for aesthetic and space requirement reasons. Typical duct locations include attics, above dropped ceilings, crawlspaces, and attached garages. A wide body of literature has found that distribution system conduction and air leakage can cause 30-40% energy losses before cooling and heating air reaches the conditioned space. Recent innovative attempts at locating ducts in the conditioned space have had mixed results in terms of improving duct efficiency. Some of these strategies include cathedralizing attics (sealing and insulating at the attic roofline) and locating ducts in interstitial spaces. This paper reviews modeling studies that suggest substantial savings could be realized from these strategies and presents field measurements which reveal that construction planning and execution errors can prevent these strategies from being widely applied or from being effective when they are applied. These types of problems will need to be overcome for effective integration of ducts into the conditioned space.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
New tools for the evaluation of daylighting strategies and technologies

New tools for the evaluation of daylighting strategies and technologies

Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Papamichael, K.; Hitchcock, R.; Ehrlich, C. & Carroll, B.
Description: The use of daylight for the illumination of building interiors has the potential to enhance the quality of the environment while providing opportunities to save energy by replacing or supplementing electric lighting. Moreover, it has the potential to reduce heating and cooling loads, which offer additional energy saving opportunities as well as reductions in HVAC equipment sizing and cost. All of these benefits, however, assume proper use of daylighting strategies and technologies, whose performance depends on the context of their application. On the other hand, improper use can have significant negative effects on both comfort and energy requirements, such as increased glare and cooling loads. To ensure proper use, designers need design tools that model the dynamic nature of daylight and accurately predict performance with respect to a multitude of performance criteria, extending beyond comfort and energy to include aesthetics, cost, security, safety, etc.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
New National Conservation Training Center a model of energy-efficient design: FEMP technical assistance case study fact sheet

New National Conservation Training Center a model of energy-efficient design: FEMP technical assistance case study fact sheet

Date: October 7, 1998
Creator: Atkison, K.
Description: This FEMP technical assistance case study shows that energy efficiency, cost effectiveness, and aesthetics can be incorporated into the design of a Federal facility--in this case the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, WV, which encompasses many buildings with a variety of purposes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Using the whole-building design approach to incorporate daylighting into a retail space: Preprint

Using the whole-building design approach to incorporate daylighting into a retail space: Preprint

Date: June 21, 2000
Creator: Hayter, S.; Torcellini, P.; Eastment, M. & Judkoff, R.
Description: This paper focuses on implementation of daylighting into the Bighorn Center, a collection of home improvement retail spaces in Silverthorne, Colorado, which were constructed in three phases. Daylighting was an integral part of the design of the Phase 3 building. Energy consultants optimized the daylighting design through detailed modeling using an hourly building energy simulation tool. Energy consultants also used this tool to address the building owner's concerns related to customer comfort and increased product sales.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Zero energy homes: Combining energy efficiency and solar energy technologies

Zero energy homes: Combining energy efficiency and solar energy technologies

Date: March 9, 2000
Creator: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (U.S.)
Description: In a typical Florida house, air-conditioning accounts for about 35% of all the electricity the home uses. As the largest single source of energy consumption in Florida, a home's air-conditioning load represents the biggest energy challenge facing Florida residents. The Florida Solar Energy Center designed a project to meet this challenge. Two homes were built with the same floor plan on near-by lots. The difference was that one (the control home) conformed to local residential building practices, and the other (the Zero Energy home) was designed with energy efficiency in mind and a solar technology system on the roof. The homes were then monitored carefully for energy use. The projects designers were looked to answer two questions: (1) could a home in a climate such as central Florida be engineered and built so efficiently that a relatively small PV system would serve the majority of its cooling needs--and even some of its daytime electrical needs; and (2) would that home be as comfortable and appealing as the conventional model built alongside it? The answer was yes, even though it was conducted in the summer of 1998--one of the hottest summers on record in Florida.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An Integrated Solid-State LED Luminaire for General Lighting

An Integrated Solid-State LED Luminaire for General Lighting

Date: March 31, 2009
Creator: Dowling, Kevin; Lys, Fritz Morgan Ihor; Datta, Mike; Keller, Bernd & Yuan, Thomas
Description: A strong systems approach to designing and building practical LED-based replacement lamps is lacking. The general method of taking high-performance LEDs and marrying them to standard printed circuit boards, drivers and a heat sink has fallen short of the promise of LED lighting. In this program, a top-down assessment of requirements and a bottom-up reinvention of LED sources, electronics, optics and mechanics have resulted in the highest performance lamp possible. The team, comprised of Color Kinetics, the leaders in LED lighting and Cree, the leaders in LED devices took an approach to reinvent the package, the driver and the overall form and aesthetic of a replacement source. The challenge was to create a new benchmark in LED lighting - the resultant lamp, a PAR38 equivalent, met the light output, color, color quality and efficacy marks set out in the program as well as being dimmable, which is important for market acceptance. The approach combined the use of multiple source die, a chip-on-board approach, a very efficient driver topology, the use of both direct emission and phosphor conversion, and a unique faceted optic to avoid the losses, artifacts and hotspots of lensed approaches. The integral heat sink provided a mechanical base ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Team learning center design principles

Team learning center design principles

Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Daily, B.; Loveland, J. & Whatley, A.
Description: This is a preliminary report of a multi-year collaboration of the authors addressing the subject: Can a facility be designed for team learning and would it improve the efficiency and effectiveness of team interactions? Team learning in this context is a broad definition that covers all activities where small to large groups of people come together to work, to learn, and to share through team activities. Multimedia, networking, such as World Wide Web and other tools, are greatly enhancing the capability of individual learning. This paper addresses the application of technology and design to facilitate group or team learning. Many organizational meetings need tens of people to come together to do work as a large group and then divide into smaller subgroups of five to ten to work and then to return and report and interact with the larger group. Current facilities were not, in general, designed for this type of meeting. Problems with current facilities are defined and a preliminary design solution to many of the identified problems is presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Visual quality assessment of electrochromic and conventional glazings

Visual quality assessment of electrochromic and conventional glazings

Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Moeck, M.; Lee, E.S.; Rubin, M.D.; Sullivan, R. & Selkowitz, S.E.
Description: Variable transmission, ``switchable`` electrochromic glazings are compared to conventional static glazings using computer simulations to assess the daylighting quality of a commercial office environment where paper and computer tasks are performed. RADIANCE simulations were made for a west-facing commercial office space under clear and overcast sky conditions. This visualization tool was used to model different glazing types, to compute luminance and illuminance levels, and to generate a parametric set of photorealistic images of typical interior views at various times of the day and year. Privacy and visual display terminal (VDT) visibility is explored. Electrochromic glazings result in a more consistent glare-free daylit environment compared to their static counterparts. However, if the glazing is controlled to minimize glare or to maintain low interior daylight levels for critical visual tasks (e.g, VDT), occupants may object to the diminished quality of the outdoor view due to its low transmission (Tv = 0.08) during those hours. RADIANCE proved to be a very powerful tool to better understand some of the design tradeoffs of this emerging glazing technology. The ability to draw specific conclusions about the relative value of different technologies or control strategies is limited by the lack of agreed upon criteria or standards ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
You catch more flies with sugar...marketing RIM

You catch more flies with sugar...marketing RIM

Date: March 6, 2000
Creator: KEENEN,MARTHA JANE
Description: There is a difference between marketing and selling. Marketing is finding out what the customer wants and/or needs and showing that customer how a product meets those needs. Modifying or repackaging the product may be required to make its utility clear to the customer. When it is, they'll buy because they, on their own, want it. Selling is pushing a product on the customer for reasons of profit, compliance, the way things have always been done here, or any others. When one markets, a relationship is built. This isn't about a one-time sale, it's about getting those records into safekeeping and customers trusting us to give them back, retrieve them, the way that customer needs them, when and how that customer needs them. This is a trust building exercise that has long-term as well as short-term actions and reactions all aligned toward that interdependent relationship between customers and us, the recorded information managers. Marketing works better than selling because human beings don't like to be pushed...think door-to-door sales people and evaluate emotions. Are they positive? Go a step further. No one likes to be told to do what's good for you? Which brings us to the fundamental marketing, as opposed ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Technical progress report: Peripheral mower blade. Sixth quarter report ending 12/31/99

Technical progress report: Peripheral mower blade. Sixth quarter report ending 12/31/99

Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: Darden, John A.
Description: Machine Tech Inc. has been assisting the author with the development of the peripheral mower blade decks. Machine Tech Inc. is still developing the batwing mower deck, which was started last fall after the completion of the mounted deck. The completion date of this program is slated for February. The wing covers and the center section of the batwing have been completed, the frame and drive-lines are now under development. Information from the nineteen-foot bat-wing deck prototype that they have been testing is now being used in the development of a more acceptable bat-wing mower. This unit will be able to maintain the same peripheral mower benefits, but will be much lighter and easier to pull requiring less fuel and damage to highway right of ways in soft areas. The mounted deck has been completed and is in the pilot stage with reports yet to be compiled. Machine Tech Inc. has also worked in an agricultural deck which is closely related to the mounted peripheral mower deck developed for the highway right of way. This will be one more outlet for the peripheral mower machines into the hands of the public.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Insights on the Cuprate High Energy Anomaly Observed in ARPES

Insights on the Cuprate High Energy Anomaly Observed in ARPES

Date: August 16, 2011
Creator: Moritz, Brian
Description: Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). The anomaly is present for both hole- and electron-doped cuprates as well as the half-filled parent insulators with different energy scales arising on either side of the phase diagram. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. creating a 'waterfall'-like appearance, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram. We find that the anomaly demarcates a transition, or cross-over, from a quasiparticle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

Date: July 8, 2012
Creator: V., Sirenko & U., Rohatgi
Description: A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Hearing Nano-Structures: A Case Study in Timbral Sonification

Hearing Nano-Structures: A Case Study in Timbral Sonification

Date: June 18, 2012
Creator: Schedel, M. & Yager, K.
Description: We explore the sonification of x-ray scattering data, which are two-dimensional arrays of intensity whose meaning is obscure and non-intuitive. Direct mapping of the experimental data into sound is found to produce timbral sonifications that, while sacrificing conventional aesthetic appeal, provide a rich auditory landscape for exploration. We discuss the optimization of sonification variables, and speculate on potential real-world applications. We have presented a case study of sonifying x-ray scattering data. Direct mapping of the two-dimensional intensity values of a scattering dataset into the two-dimensional matrix of a sonogram is a natural and information-preserving operation that creates rich sounds. Our work supports the notion that many problems in understanding rather abstract scientific datasets can be ameliorated by adding the auditory modality of sonification. We further emphasize that sonification need not be limited to time-series data: any data matrix is amenable. Timbral sonification is less obviously aesthetic, than tonal sonification, which generate melody, harmony, or rhythm. However these musical sonifications necessarily sacrifice information content for beauty. Timbral sonification is useful because the entire dataset is represented. Non-musicians can understand the data through the overall color of the sound; audio experts can extract more detailed insight by studying all the features of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
New Mexicans` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Winter, 1992--1993

New Mexicans` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Winter, 1992--1993

Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: unknown
Description: This report uses survey data to profile New Mexico residents` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The survey results are the responses of a representative, stratified random sample of 992 New Mexico households to a set of questions asked in October, 1992. The data allow statistical inference to the general population`s responses to the same set of questions at the time the survey was administered. The results provide an overview of New Mexico residents` current images and perceptions of the Laboratory. The sample margin of error is plus or minus 3.5% at the 95% confidence level.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
New Mexicans` perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory: Awareness and evaluations

New Mexicans` perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory: Awareness and evaluations

Date: November 1, 1990
Creator: unknown
Description: This report uses survey data to profile New Mexico residents`perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The survey results are the responses of a representative, randomly selected sample of New Mexico households to a set of questions asked in September and October 1990. The data allow statistical inference to the general population`s responses to the same set of questions at the time the survey was administered. The results provide an overview of New Mexico residents` current perceptions of LANL. The sample margin of error is slightly less than plus or minus five percent. Because our sample frame is designed to be proportionate to population, counties with the smallest populations, such as Mora and Los Alamos, tend to have very few respondents in a standard sample. In order to have sample sizes sufficiently large to discern statistically significant differences across these counties, we took additional, non-proportionate random samples from Los Alamos County and its neighboring counties, including Rio Arriba, Taos, San Miguel, Mora and Sandoval Counties. This required the specification of new sample frames for each of the six counties and an additional sample of 300 respondents (50 in each county). Therefore, the analysis for this report is somewhat more complex ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 NEXT LAST