Recess Appointments: Frequently Asked Questions

Recess Appointments: Frequently Asked Questions

Date: January 9, 2012
Creator: Hogue, Henry B.
Description: This report supplies brief answers to some frequently asked questions regarding recess appointments. These are appointments to high-level policy-making positions in federal departments which are generally confirmed by the Senate. When the Senate is in recess, the President may make a temporary appointment, called a recess appointment, to any such position without Senate approval.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Presidential Appointee Positions Requiring Senate Confirmation and Committees Handling Nominations

Presidential Appointee Positions Requiring Senate Confirmation and Committees Handling Nominations

Date: November 25, 2013
Creator: Davis, Christopher M. & Mansfield, Jerry W.
Description: This report identifies, by Senate committee, presidentially appointed positions requiring Senate confirmation based on referrals as of the date of passage of S. 679, which became P.L. 112-166 on August 10, 2012.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Recess Appointments: A Legal Overview

Recess Appointments: A Legal Overview

Date: January 6, 2012
Creator: Chu, Vivian S.
Description: This report provides an overview of the Recess Appointments Clause, exploring its historical application and legal interpretation by the executive branch, the courts, and the Comptroller General. Furthermore, congressional legislation designed to prevent the President's overuse or misuse of the Clause is also explored.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations, 1789 - 2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Supreme Court Nominations, 1789 - 2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Bearden, Maureen
Description: The process of appointing Supreme Court Justices has undergone changes over two centuries, but its most basic feature -- the sharing of power between the President and Senate -- has remained unchanged. To receive a lifetime appointment to the Court, a candidate must first be nominated by the President and then confirmed by the Senate. Table 1 of this report lists and describes actions taken by the Senate, the Senate Judiciary Committee, and the President on all Supreme Court nominations, from 1789 to the present. The table provides the name of each person nominated to the Court and the name of the President making the nomination. It also tracks the dates of formal actions taken, and time elapsing between these actions, by the Senate or Senate Judiciary Committee on each nomination, starting with the date that the Senate received the nomination from the President.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-2005: Actions by the Senate, Judiciary Committee, and the President

Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-2005: Actions by the Senate, Judiciary Committee, and the President

Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Bearden, Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations Not Confirmed, 1789-2004

Supreme Court Nominations Not Confirmed, 1789-2004

Date: March 21, 2005
Creator: Hogue, Henry B
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Date: March 29, 2005
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: Over time, the Senate has developed a series of procedures to deal with the concerns of its Members on nominations. First is the custom of senatorial courtesy, whereby Senators from the same party as the President might influence a nomination or kill it by objecting to it. This tradition has not always been absolute, but it has allowed Senators to play a fairly large role, particularly in the selection of nominees within a Senator’s home state, such as for district court judgeships.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Bearden, Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Senate Confirmation Process: An Overview

Senate Confirmation Process: An Overview

Date: April 4, 2003
Creator: Tong, Lorraine H
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Presidential Appointee Positions Requiring Senate Confirmation and Committees Handling Nominations

Presidential Appointee Positions Requiring Senate Confirmation and Committees Handling Nominations

Date: November 15, 2012
Creator: Davis, Christopher M. & Mansfield, Jerry W.
Description: Report that identifies, by Senate committee, presidentially appointed positions requiring Senate confirmation based on referrals as of the date of passage of S. 679, which became P.L. 112-166 on August 10, 2012. It begins with a brief description of the referral process and identify, for each committee to which referrals have been made, the positions that fall within the committee's jurisdiction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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