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 Country: Spain
EU-U.S. Economic Ties: Framework, Scope, and Magnitude

EU-U.S. Economic Ties: Framework, Scope, and Magnitude

Date: January 27, 2011
Creator: Cooper, William H.
Description: This report provides background information and analysis of the U.S.-EU economic relationship for members of the 112th Congress as they contemplate the costs and benefits of closer U.S. economic ties with the EU. It examines the economic and political framework of the relationship and the scope and magnitude of the ties based on data from various sources. In addition, the report analyzes the implications these factors have for U.S. economic policy toward the EU.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
European Union Enlargement: A Status Report on Turkey's Accession Negotiations

European Union Enlargement: A Status Report on Turkey's Accession Negotiations

Date: January 10, 2011
Creator: Morelli, Vincent
Description: This report provides a brief overview of the European Union's (EU) accession process, Turkey's path to EU membership, and the impact of the Cyprus problem.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Persistence of Castilian Law in Frontier Texas: the Legal Status of Women

The Persistence of Castilian Law in Frontier Texas: the Legal Status of Women

Date: May 1996
Creator: Stuntz, Jean A.
Description: Castilian law developed during the Reconquest of Spain. Women received certain legal rights to persuade them to move to the villages on the expanding frontier. These legal rights were codified in Las Siete Partidas, the monumental work of Castilian law, compiled in the thirteenth century. Under Queen Isabella, Castilian law became the law of all Spain. As Spain discovered, explored, and colonized the New World, Castilian law spread. The Recopilacidn de Los Leyes de Las Indias complied the laws for all the colonies. Texas, as the last area in North America settled by Spain, retained Castilian law. Case law from the Bexar Archives proves this for the Villa of San Fernando(present-day San Antonio). Castilian laws and customs persisted even on the Texas frontier.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Bac de Roda/Felip II Bridge

Bac de Roda/Felip II Bridge

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 1987
Creator: Calatrava Valls, Santiago
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Bac de Roda/Felip II Bridge

Bac de Roda/Felip II Bridge

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 1987
Creator: Calatrava Valls, Santiago
Description: View of the Bac de Roda bridge in Barcelona, Spain.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Bac de Roda/Felip II Bridge

Bac de Roda/Felip II Bridge

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 1987
Creator: Calatrava Valls, Santiago
Description: View of a portion of the walkway on the Bac de Roda Bridge in Barcelona, Spain.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Barcelona Pavilion

Barcelona Pavilion

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 1929
Creator: Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig
Description: The view is through the glass to the sculpture, Dawn, by Georg Kolbe, situated in the reflecting pool. The highly figured marble is visible behind the standing statue.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan

Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 0097/0117
Creator: unknown
Description: Detail view from the S with Cathedral seen through arch of the Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan. Tallest arches are 29 meters. From the Roman Imperial Period.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan

Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 0097/0117
Creator: unknown
Description: Raking view from the S of the Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan. Tallest arches are 29 meters. From the Roman Imperial Period.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan

Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 0097/0117
Creator: unknown
Description: Raking view of lower portion of the Roman Aqueduct, Reign of Trajan; approaching the city from the E. Tallest arches are 29 meters high. From the Roman Imperial Period.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
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