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Tom Jones; comedie lyrique en trois actes
Philidor’s Tom Jones is representative of the continental interest in English literature. Henry Fielding’s homonymous novel served as the foundation for Philidor’s opera, but Philidor pared down the story quite a bit, especially downplaying Tom’s philandering ways. Many secondary characters and situations were also cut, a common technique that librettists employ when adapting prose writings to the stage. Thus, a central plot unfolds in a manner that the audience can follow, and the length remains manageable for an evening’s entertainment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc36/
[Tom Scott Lecture, April 13, 1982: Part 1]
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Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Tom Scott on April 13, 1982, 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. The lecture includes a performance by Tom Scott, tenor saxophone, interspersed with questions from the audience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12859/
[Tom Scott Lecture, April 13, 1982: Part 2]
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Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Tom Scott on April 13, 1982, 12:30PM at the UNT College of Music. The lecture includes a performance by Tom Scott, tenor saxophone, interspersed with questions from the audience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12861/
[Tommy Flanagan Lecture, March 22, 1983]
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Recording of a Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Tommy Flanagan on March 22, 1983 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and performance by Tommy Flanagan, piano. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12877/
Le tonnelier
Libretto of the comic opera "Le tonnelier" (The cooper) by Nicolas-Médard Audinot in collaboration with Antoine-François Quétant. The music of this one-act opera is a pasticcio of works by Gossec and other contemporaneous composers. Typical of the genre, the opera contains a variety of musical forms (airs, romance, vaudeville, and recitatives) and the dialogues are interspersed with additional airs, possibly using popular tunes. This copy includes (on pp. 52 and 54-56) notated melodies of airs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39261/
[Toscanini and Gillis]
Photograph of three men identified as Don Gillis (far right), Arturo Toscanini (middle) and an unidentified man on the far left. Gillis is wearing a light-colored suit and the other two men are wearing dark clothing. There appear to be music stands organized behind them. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86072/
Tractatus de musica
The present volume is a 1875 compendium of various Latin music treatises by Johannes Tinctoris gathered from manuscript sources from Brussels, Bologna and Gand. The present edition, edited by Charles Coussemaker, comprises ten of the twelve surviving manuscripts of Tinctoris's theoretical works. According to Oxford Music, these were written in the first few years of his employment at Ferrante's court and demonstrate Tinctoris's intellectual and pedagogical mastery of music theory. They also demonstrate his acquaintance with contemporaneous composers of the early Renaissance Burgundian composers like Antoine Busnoys, as well as with the music of Franco-Flemish composers such as Johannes Ockeghem. Below is a table of content listing the titles of each treatise and a brief description of the concepts they treat. Treatises and Description: "Expositio manus" - this treatise is divided in 10 chapters consisting of: definitions, places, clefs, voicing, properties, deductions, mutations, conjunctions, conclusion; "Liber de natura et proprietate tonorum" - this treatise is divided in 51 chapters containing: definitions and name of tones, concerning the species diatessaron and diapente, formation of first throughout the eighth tone, authentic and plagal modes, ascending and descending perfect/imperfect tones; "Tractatius de notis et pausi" - this treatise is divided in two books. Book one contains a prologue and 14 chapters devoted to definitions of note values (e.g., long, breve, semi-breve, minim) and the use of ligatures. Book 2 explains the notation of note rests; "Tractatus de regulari valore notarum" - this treatise is this treatise includes a prologue and 32 chapters devoted to explanations of the musical notation of tempi and modes and the use of prolation (i.e., symbols used to indicate perfect and imperfect subdivisions of the breve; "Liber imperfectionum musicalium notarum" - this treatise is divided in two Books and a prologue. These are concerned with the notation of perfection and imperfection in major mode; "Tractatus alterationum" - note alterations; "De punctis musicalibus" - this treatise is divided in three books. The first book contains 19 chapters concerned with the use of the point to alter note values and tempi. Book two, divided in 34 chapters, discusses the use of semitones, tritone, tuning considerations, and counterpoint rules. The third book, divided in 9 chapters, discusses counterpoint rules; "Proportionale musices" - this treatise is divided in three books. The first book, divided in 9 chapters, defines and discusses the rules of music proportions. The second book, in 6 chapters, discusses major and minor relations. The third book, divided in 8 chapters, discusses the qualities of various prolations; "Diffinitorium Musices" - this treatise contains a prologue and 20 chapters all of which define musical terms; "Complexus effectuum musices" - this part contains two treatises found in two sources: the manuscript codex of Brussels (9 chapters) and the codex of Gand (20 sections). Both codices are devoted to the physical, emotional and spiritual effects of music. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31512/
Le triomphe de l'amour
Libretto of the ballet "Le triomphe de l'amour" written by Philippe Quinault in collaboration with Isaac de Benserade. It is divided in two parts. The first, contais the prologue and the ballet entrances (i.e., entrées); the second part contains flattering comments and instructions directed to the noble people participating in the ballet. Each of the entrées that comprise "Le Triomphe de l'Amour" reveal aspects of love triumphant. The theater represents a magnificently ornate place where a crowd receives Amour (i.e., the god Love), the son of Venus. The latter presides over the crowd and sings of the virtues of the king who has restored peace to his kingdom. Venus entreats everyone to pay homage to her victorious son. The first performance took place at Saint-Germain-en-Laye on January 21, 1681. The twenty entrées of this 'ballet de cour' (i.e., court ballet) were choreographed by Pierre Beauchamp with music by Jean-Baptiste Lully. Carlo Vigarani designed the stage décor and Jean Berain provided designs for costumes and decorations of this royal festivity. This copy includes a frontispiece engraving that depicts a stage setting by Daniel Marot. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39262/
Le triomphe de l'amour
Le Triomphe de l'Amour, a ballet de cour created by composer Jean-Baptiste Lully and librettists Isaac de Benserade and Philippe Quinault, was danced for the first time at Saint-Germain-en-Laye on January 21, 1681. Several setbacks, including the illness of the dauphin and the reluctance of court ladies to attend the ballet, postponed its premiere for nearly three months. Benserade, one of the creators of the ballet de cour, was drawn out of retirement to create verses in celebration of the dauphin's marriage to Marie-Anne-Christine-Victoire of Bavaria. The first public performance at the Palais Royale in Paris took place May 6, 1681. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc75/
Le triomphe de l'amour : ballet royal
Le Triomphe de l'Amour, a ballet de cour created by composer Jean-Baptiste Lully and librettists Isaac de Benserade and Philippe Quinault, was danced for the first time at Saint-Germain-en-Laye on January 21, 1681. Several setbacks, including the illness of the dauphin and the reluctance of court ladies to attend the ballet, postponed its premiere for nearly three months. Benserade, one of the creators of the ballet de cour, was drawn out of retirement to create verses in celebration of the dauphin's marriage to Marie-Anne-Christine-Victoire of Bavaria. The first public performance at the Palais Royale in Paris took place May 6, 1681. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc72/
Le trompeur trompe, ou, La rencontre imprevue. Opera-comique en un acte. Represente pour la premiere fois sur le Theatre de la Foire S. Germain, le 18 fevrier 1754.
In the mid-eighteenth century, comic opera librettos served a dual purpose, as evinced by the libretto to Vadé ’s Trompeur trompé (1754). Although the primary function of the publication was to allow audience members to follow along with the text of the opera, solo airs were printed in the back of the book. Not all the melodies are included, but those printed in the libretto enhance our understanding of an opera the music of which was never published as a comprehensive musical score. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc81/
[Uncut Photographs Featuring Ted Craeger, Chuck Suber, Marshall Brown, and Gene Hall]
Photographs depicting multiple scenes that feature Ted Craeger, Chuck Suber, Marshall Brown, and Gene Hall. There photos are arranged in four columns and three rows. The first row is made up of three shots of two women in a dark room. One woman is in the background and largely obscured by darkness. The woman in the foreground has short hair, is wearing a floral print, and is reading a magazine. The second column has Gene Hall standing to the right among other men. The bottom photograph has Hall standing while other men sit at tables in a room with brick walls. The first picture of the third column is of four men standing together in a room. A man wearing glasses and holding a cigarette addresses the other three. The second photo of the third column features the same man talking to two other people in a dark room decorated with small chairs and tall curtains. The third photo is of a man in a white shirt addressing a dark room of boys holding instruments and sitting at desks with sheet music. The fourth column features three similar photos, wherein images are made over a young man's left shoulder as he blows into his instrument while the white shirted man from the previous pictures gesticulates. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc181770/
UNT Opera: 2011-08-06
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A UNT Opera Summer Workshop performance at the UNT College of Music Lyric Theater. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc171585/
UNT Opera: 2011-08-07
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A UNT Opera Summer Workshop performance at the UNT College of Music Lyric Theater. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc171586/
Valses brillantes
This is a digital copy of "Valses brillantes" by Leopold von Meyer. This piece was issued as the third of four pieces published under the title "Repertoire de Léopold de Meyer." The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. "Valses brillantes" is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39279/
Variations brillantes sur la cavatine favorite Aurora sorgerai
This is a digital copy of the ca. 1830 edition of Henri Herz's Brilliant variations for the piano forte on the cavatina "Aurora che sorcerai" from Rossini's two-act melodrama "La donna del lago," (i.e., The lady of the lake). The library's copy is part of a bound collection of piano music by variopus nineteenth-century composers. The pianist, and Herz's friend, Franz Hünten adapted several passages of the music to suit the range of the contemporaneous piano fortes. A note on the t.p. indicates that "Mrs. [Lucy] Anderson had the distinguished honor of performing this piece before their Majesties at Brighton." Plate no. 476. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39282/
Variations sur un thême de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37
This is a digital copy of "Variations sur un thême de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37" by Leopold von Meyer. The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. This piece was dedicate to madame d'Obrescoff. Variations sur un thême de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37 is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39281/
Walkin' by the River
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This is a manuscript score of Joseph [Joe] A. Coccia's arrangement for jazz ensemble of the song "Walkin' by the River," by Una Mae Carlisle. It includes chord symbols and sections of the music, dynamics and solo entrances were marked using red pencil. On the back of the last page of the manuscript, there are suggested performance instructions and an alternative ending addressed to Stan [Kenton]. Each page of the manuscript bears the inscription "Stan Kenton Orch." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11082/
[Wayne Andre Lecture, April 19, 1983: Part 1]
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Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Wayne Andre on April 19, 1983 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and performance by Wayne Andre, trombone, interspersed with questions from the audience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13011/
[Wayne Andre Lecture, April 19, 1983: Part 2]
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Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Wayne Andre on April 19, 1983 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and performance by Wayne Andre, trombone, interspersed with questions from the audience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12885/
[Willis Conover Lecture, February 15, 1983: Part 1]
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Recording of a Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Clark Terry on February 15, 1983 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and musical examples by Willis Conover interspersed with questions from the audience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12870/
[Willis Conover Lecture, February 15, 1983: Part 2]
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Recording of a Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Willis Conover on February 15, 1983 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and musical examples by Willis Conover interspersed with questions from the audience. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12854/
Zephire et Flore
This is a digital reproduction of the 1688 libretto of the opera "Zephire et Flore" by Michel Du Boullay. The music of the opera is attributed to Louis and Jean-Louis Lully, sons of Jean-Baptiste Lully. It was performed for the first time on March 22, 1688 at the Palais Royale in Paris. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39291/
Zéphire et Flore; opéra en musique
Zephire et Flore, the only opera attributed to Louis and Jean-Louis Lully, sons of Jean-Baptiste Lully, sets a libretto by Michel Du Boullay based on episodes from Greek mythology. It was performed for the first time 22 March 1688 at the Palais Royale in Paris. There is no record of a court performance, and it was revived only once, in June of 1715, with revisions by Destouches. We know of no modern performances, nor recordings of the opera in whole or in part. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc73/
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