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  Partner: UNT Music Library
 Collection: Virtual Music Rare Book Room
Issé
1724 score of André Cardinal Destouches' opera Issé. Destouches’s Issé premiered in 1697, just nine years after the death of Jean-Baptiste Lully. The tradition of featuring new operas at the court prior to a public premiere—common during Lully’s later years—was reinstated with this work. When Destouches revived the opera in 1708, he enlarged the original three-act work to five acts. This allowed for expanded divertissements, choruses, and more elaborate arias, which appealed to contemporary public preferences. The volume in the Virtual Rare Book Room is the five-act version. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5/
Le istitutioni harmoniche
This is a 1562 copy of "Le istitutioni harmoniche," one of the most influential music theory treatises written by Gioseffo Zarlino. The first edition appeared in Venice in 1558. The treatise, divided in four parts, includes theoretical and practical elements of music. The first two parts discuss philosophical, cosmological and mathematical aspects of music, Greek tonal system and tuning. The third and fourth parts cover the rules of counterpoint and modes, respectively. This copy bears a dedication to Vicenzo Diedo. It contains a table of contents per chapter and list of corrections. Several handwritten annotations appear on the t.p. ink: "coll: cochi nuoi soc: Jesù;" "exdono Joannis Jerary;" and "Inscriptet catalog." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25955/
Jeannot et Colin
This is a ca. 1857 copy of the libretto of Jeannot et Colin, an opera by Charles Etienne with music by Nicolo Isouard. The opera premiered in Paris at the theater of the Opéra-Comique on 17 October 1814. The expressive melodies of the opera as well as its performers ensured its success. The opera was staged again on 14 October 1857. The first page of the library's copy contain the names of the performers that participated in both productions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39260/
Judas Maccabaeus
This is a [ca. 1740] score of Judas Maccabaeus, a sacred oratorio by Handel. It contains a table of songs for each of the three acts of the oratorio and a descriptive catalog of music composed by Handel, which includes: Italian operas, English oratorios as well as concertos, chamber music and transcription of vocal music for instruments. The performance forces include: vocal soloists (SATB or SATB), strings (violins, viola, violoncello and contra bass), oboes, traverse flute, and bassoon. It also includes figured bass for continuo playing. The names of singers (Gambarini, Galli, Reinhold, and Beard) appear at the heading of each aria. Page [73], incorrectly numbered 48, contains a keyboard march identified as: No.484 Marche. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11799/
Love in a Village: a Comic Opera As it is Performed at the Theatre Royal in Covent-Garden. For the Harpsicord, Voice, German Flute, or Violin.
Vocal score for Love in a Village is broken into four labeled sections ('books'), each of which has a separate title page, and includes the music from the comic opera which has figured bass. Some of the music includes underlaid lyrics and the names of the persons who performed the pieces. Table of contents for the entire work is on page [1]. According to Grove Music Online, the opera is the story of a heroine (Rosetta) who runs away from an unhappy marriage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25957/
Lucrezia Borgia, introduction and brilliant variations, for the piano forte
This is a digital copy of the "Lucrezia Borgia, introduction and brilliant variations, for the piano forte" by Leopold von Meyer. The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. "Lucrezia Borgia, introduction and brilliant variations" is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. This piece was inspired on the opera "Lucrezia Borgia" (1833) by Gaetano Donizetti to whom von Meyer dedicated the work. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39275/
Machmudier
This is a digital copy of the Moroccan march "Machmudier, air guerrier national' des Turcs" by Leopold von Meyer. The Austrian composer and pianist von Meyer, had a successful performance career in Russia, eastern Europe and Vienna and also achieved success in London and Paris. He visited the United States on October 1845 and his histrionic performance style and bravura showpieces were received with wide acclaim. This piece was dedicate to Lieutenant Brownlow C. Bertie of the 2nd Regiment of Life Guards. The caption on page 1 of "No. 1 Air guerrier guerrier des Turcs" suggests that this is the first of several such piano Turkish/Moroccan marches composed by von Meyer. The one shown here is part of a bound collection of piano pieces composed by von Meyer that also includes fantasies on famous nineteenth-century operas, variations, national airs, marches, valses, an etude and nocturnes. These are the titles of all the piano pieces by von Meyer in the order in which they appear in the library's collection: Lucrezia Borgia: introduction and brilliant variations for the piano forte; Variations sur un theme de Semiramis de Rossini, op.37; Fantaisie sur L'Elixir d'amore, op.32; Fantaisie sur Norma de Bellini, op. 40; Fantaisie sur un air de Bellini; Le carnaval de Venise, varié pour le piano, op.31; Grande fantaisie orientale sur deux themes arabes, op.38; Fantaisie sur Les Hirondelles de Felicien David; Airs russes: fantaisie pour le piano forte, op.43; Marche marocaine Machmudier: air guerrier national [sic] des turcs [sic]; Grande march [sic] triomphale D'Isly, op.30; Hortense: notturno for the piano forte; Andante for the piano forte, op.42; Bajazeth: air nationale des turques; Grande etude de bataille, op.35; Quatre morceaux pour le piano forte: no.1 Le depart et le retour (deux noturnes); no.2 Airs russes, op.20; no.3 Valses brillantes; no.4 Grand gallop de bravoure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39276/
Le mariage d'Antonio. Divertissement en un acte et en prose
Lucile Grétry’s opera Le mariage d’Antonio premiered in Paris when she was a mere fourteen years old. As the second daughter of André-Ernest-Modeste Grétry, she was afforded lessons at a young age in counterpoint and declamation. Her father supplied the orchestral parts for her comédie mêlée d’ariettes after Lucile had composed the vocal, bass, and harp parts. Although Le mariage d’Antonio was a modest success, Lucile’s second endeavor, a divertissement mêlée d’ariettes entitled Toinette et Louis (1787), did not receive the same positive attention. The young composer died from tuberculosis before she could establish herself further at the Comédie-Italienne. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc24/
Matrimonio segreto : dramma giocoso in due atti = ou, Le mariage secret : opera comiLe mariage secret : opera comique en deux actesque en deux actes
Domenico Cimarosa’s Il matrimonio segreto premiered at the Burgtheater in Vienna on 7 February 1792, just two months after Mozart’s death. It received immediate accolades, particularly from Emperor Leopold II, and the opera was performed a second time that day for a private audience that included the Holy Roman ruler. Il matrimonio segreto enjoyed a successful run that lasted almost a hundred years, with revised versions appearing in the second half of the nineteenth century; in 1933, the work was performed at the Library of Congress. Although the harmonic language is largely diatonic, Cimarosa’s beautiful melodies and exciting rhythms complement Bertati’s direct text. The opera presents the predicament of the secretly married couple without resorting to stock plot conventions such as characters in disguise, conveying the dramatic naturalness and simplicity promoted by Rousseau. The inventive orchestration, which includes clarinets, was another aspect of the opera that was praised by some (while Schumann appreciated the orchestration, Berlioz was unimpressed). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82/
Mélomanie : opera comique en un acte en vers mêlé d'ariettes mis en musique
During his early career, Champein was known for church music composed while he worked as music master at the collegiate church in Pignon (in the southern Provence region of France). He moved to Paris and established himself as an operatic composer; La mélomanie (1781) is one of his most famous operas, and it remained in the repertoire at the Opéra-Comique until 1829. La mélomanie actually mocks the debate between French and Italian styles of music, with Fugantini as an Italian who is rejected by the French Elise. References to harmony (a French feature) and melody (emphasized by advocates of Italian music) abound in the opera. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc78/
Messa à 4
This a manuscript copy of two Mass movements, Kyrie and Gloria, gathered from a "Messa à 4." The copyist, Vincenso Marchetti, attributed this mass to the composer Matteo Bisso. The texts of both movements of the Mass are divided in several sections and set musically for an ensemble of mixed choir (S.A.T.B), vocal soloists, strings and basso continuo. Each section reflects changes of tonality, tempo, and musical meter. The composer indicated dynamics, the use of muted strings (e.g., p.[84]) and performance indications such as unison and col parte (e.g., p. [76] and p.[79]). The last section for the Chirie [sic] is set musically as a slow fugue in triple meter. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86519/
Messiah
This is the score of the first published edition of Handel's sacred oratorio, Messiah to the English text by the librettist Charles Jennens. It includes an engrave lithograph showing a portrait of Handel and musical instruments and mythological figures playing instruments. A list of subscribers before the content index includes the King, Queen [of England], His Royal Highness the Duke of York, His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester, His Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland. The content index includes incipit of recitatives and arias of each part. New pagination starts after the end of the oratorio at page 188 for added music. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11800/
Momie
This is a ca. 1778 libretto for the burlesque opera in three acts "Momie" by a Jean Étiennethat Despréaux. The opera is a parody based on Leblanc du Roullet's libretto of "Iphigénie en Aulide," an opera by Christoph Willibald Gluck. The libretto includes the titles of the tunes at the opening of each scene. Page 6 of the library's copy is incorrectly numbered as page 9. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25958/
The musical library, vocal
This is a digital copy of volumes 3 and 4 of "The musical library," a bound collection of part songs and songs with piano accompaniment edited by William Ayrton. It includes arrangements of famous nineteenth-century tunes, madrigals, ballads, canzones, elegies, and opera arias by various composers. The contents of each volume are given below: Vol. 3: Glee, "Desolate is the dwelling of Morna" by Dr. [William Hutchins] Callcott, pp. 1-5; Cavatina, "Col sorriso d'innocenzo," from the opera "Il pirata" by [Vicenzo] Bellini, pp. 6-7; A Brazilian Air, "And are these the mountains," U.A., pp. 8-9; Quartet, "Pieta di noi," from the comic opera "L'arbore di Diana" by Vicenzo Martini, pp. 10-13; Cantata, "From rosy Bow'rs" by [Henry] Purcell, pp. 14-19; Air (de trios notes), "Que le jour me dire!" by [Jean-Jacques] Rousseau, p. 20; Aria, "Infelice in tanti affani" by Carl Friedrich Zelter, pp. 21-23; Elegy, "Ye woods and ye mountains" by [William] Jackson (of Exeter), pp. 24-27; Romance, "Oh! forbear to bid me slight her" by [Johann Nepomuk] Hummel, p. [28]-29; Song, "No flower that blows," from the opera "Selima and Azor" by [Thomas] Linley (Senior), p. 29-31; Duetto, "Caro! Bella!," from the opera "Giulio Cesare" by [George Frideric] Handel, pp. 32-35; Madrigal, "Sweet honey-sucking bee" by [John] Wilbye, pp. 36-47; Ballad, "The brooks lullaby" by [Carl Gottlieb] Reissiger, pp. 48-50; Round, "Here is sweet sleep" by [William] Horsley [(1774-1858)], p. 51; Rondo, "La Verginella come la rosa" by [Ferdinando Gasparo] Bertoni [(1725-1813)], pp. 51-53; Ariette, "Le doux mal" by [Etienne Nicolas] Méhul [(1763-1817)], pp. 54-55; Song, "The hardy sailor," From the opera "The castle of Andalusia" by Dr. [Samuel] Arnold pp. 56-57; Duet, "Italian queen," pp. [58]-[60]; Recitative; Aria, "Alma del gran Pompeo; Piangerò," from the opera "Giulio Cesare" by [George Frideric] Handel, pp. 61-63; Prize-Glee, "Swiftly from the mountain's brow" by [Samuel] Webbe [(1740-1816)], pp. 64-69; Song, "Gentle youth, ah! Tell me why?," from "Love in a village" by [Thomas] Arne, pp. 70-71; Coronach (or Dirge), "He is gone on the mountain," from "Scott's Lady of the lake" by [Thomas] Attwood [(1765-1838)], pp. 71-73; Glee, "In holiday gown" by Thomas Fitzherbert, pp. 74-77; Arietta, "Or son d'Elena invaghito," from the comic opera "Un' Avventurata di Scaramuccia" by Luigi Ricci, pp. 78-79; Duettino, "Tendre fruit des pleurs d'aurore" by [Jean-Jacques] Rousseau, p. 80; Duet, "Dolce dell' anima," from the opera "Sargino" by [Ferdinando] Paer, pp. 81-83; Song, "'Tis not wealth, it is not birth," from "Love in a Village" by [Felice] Giardini [1716-1796], pp. [84]-85; Song, "O had I been by fate decreed," from "Love in a Village" by Dr. [Samuel] Howard, p. [86]-87; Russian air, by U.A., p. 87; Four-part song, "Enjoy thyself howe'er thou art" (Ermunterung) by [Carl-Maria] von Weber, p. 88-89; Canzonet, "The fortune land" (Das glückliche Land) by [Ludwig van] Beethoven, pp. 90-93; Madrigal, "The nightingale" by Thomas Weelkes (1600), pp. 94-97; Rondo, "Down, down a thousand fathom deep" by [Karl] Keller, pp. 98-100; Terzettino, "Angiol di pace all' anima," from the opera "Beatrice di Tenda" by [Vicenzo] Bellini, pp. 101-103; Cavatina, "Piu Bianca di giglio," from "La cosa rara" by [Vicente] Martin [y Soler] (also listed as Vicenzo Martini), pp. 104-105; Song, "The sapling oak," from "The siege of Belgrade" by [Stephen] Storace, pp. 106-108; Prize-Glee (1773), "In the merry month of May" by Benjamin Cooke, pp. 109-115; Song, "The letter of flowers" by Franz Schubert, pp. 116-117; Duet, "The neighb'ring convent's bell," from "The padlock" by [Charles] Dibdin, pp. 118-120; Elegia, "Sulla tomba di Bellini, l'amico dolente" by [Jules Eugene Abraham Alary (1814-1894)], pp. 121-123; Song, "An address to a Locket" by Dr. [Samuel] Arnold, pp. 124-125; Glee, "Oh! Tarry gentle traveler" by Dr. [William Hutchins] Callcott, pp. 126-131; "Romance and Duet," from the opera "Fortunatus" by [Xavier] Schnyder [von Wartensee, (1786-1868)], pp. 132-134; "A spring song" (Fruhlingslied) by [Felix] Mendelssohn, pp. 134-135; Caliban's song, "The Owl is abroad" from "The tempest" (as altered in 1756) by John Christian Smith, pp. 136-137; Song, "Henry cull'd the flow'ret's bloom," as sung in the opera "Rosina" by [Antonio] Sacchini, pp. 138-140; Round, "[Se placar volete amore / Nel contrasto Amor si rende]" by Vicenzo Martini, [words by Pietro Metastasio, from "Strofe per musica," aria L], p. 140; Canzonet for four voices, "Canst thou love and live alone?" by Ravenscroft, pp. 141-143; Air, "Le secret" by Franz Schubert, [from "Zwei Lieder," Op. 14, No. 2 Geheimes, D 719], pp. 144-146; Song, "Come, dear Maria!" by [Sigismund Ritter von] Neükomm, pp. 146-147; Arietta, "The country wedding" arr. by Thomas Joseph Ritson, pp. 148-149; Cavatina, "Tu sai qual oggetto," from the opera "Constanza e Romilda" by [Giacomo] Meyerbeer, pp. 150-151; Cantata, "Let the dreadful engines," from the opera "Don Quixote" by [Henry] Purcell, pp. 152-157; Terzetto and chorus, "O come o bella" by [Samuel] Webbe, pp. 158-160; Cavatina, "Sgombra I miei dubbi, o cielo!," from the opera "Ismalia" by [Saverino] Mercadante, pp. 161-163; Glee, "The seasons" by Dr. [Samuel] Arnold, pp. 164-169; Duet, "Soft is the Zephyr's breezy wing" by [Thomas Augustine] Geary, pp. 170-173; Romance, "Expectation" by [Felix] Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, pp. 174-175; Song, "Peaceful slumb'ring on the Ocean," from the opera "The pirates" by [Stephen] Storace, p. 176; Vol. 4: Duet, "O what various charms unfolding," [from] "Seasons" by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 1-3; Song, "No, 'twas neither shape nor feature" (introduced in "The flitch of Bacon") by [Giovanni] Paisiello, pp. 4-5; Romance "Ma belle Ange" by Théodore Labarre, pp. 6-7; Trio, "When the rosy morn appearing," from the opera "Rosina" [by Antonio Sacchini], pp. 8-10; Cavatina, "Si, lo sento," from the opera "Faust" by [Louis] Spohr, pp. 11-13; Round, "The dumb peal" by Dr. [Benjamin] Cooke, p. 13; Cantata, "Alexis" by John Christopher Pepusch, pp. 14-19; Glee, "Melting airs soft joys inspire" by Dr. William Hayes, p. 20; Canzonetta, "Vita felice" by [Ludwig van] Beethoven, pp. 21-23; Song, "How hardy I conceal'd my tears," [music from Das Traumbild by Wolfgang Amadeus] Mozart, pp. 24-25; Duettom "Unito a un puro affetto," in the opera "Teseo" (Theseus) by [George Frideric] Handel, pp. 25-28; Glee, "Mark'd you her eye of heavenly blue?" by [Reginald] Spofforth, pp. 29-31; Madrigal, "Cynthia! Thy song and chanting" by Giovanni Croce, pp. 32-37; Song, "With lowly suit and plaintive ditty," from the two-act opera "No song, no supper" by [Stephen] Storace, pp. [38]-40; Canzonetta, "Aure amiche" by Georg Müller, pp. 41-43; Quartetto, "Dal tuo stellato soglio," from the opera "Mosè in Egitto" by [Gioachino] Rossini, pp. 43-[47]; Song, "Encompass'd in an angel's frame," from the [opera] "Lord of the Manor" by [William] Jackson, pp. 48-49; Canzonet, "I my dear, was born to-day" by [John] Travers, pp. 49-55; Canzonetta, "In questa tomba oscura," [WoO133] by [Ludwig van] Beethoven, pp. 56-57; Recti[ative] and Air, "How gentle was my Damon's air! / On every hill in every grove," from the masque "Comus," [music by] Dr. [Thomas] Arne, pp. 58-60; Song, "What makes this poor bosom" by [Louis] Spohr, pp. 61-63; Trio, "An argument" by I[gnaz] Moscheles, pp. 64-65; Ballad, "Ere around the huge oak," from the comic opera, "The farmer" by [William] Shield, pp. 66-67; Canzonetta, "La contraddizione" by Gabriello Piozzi, pp. 67-69; Prize Glee, "Awake! Aeolian lyre" by [John] Danby, pp. 70-73; Duet, "Dopo cento affanni," from the opera "[La Grotta di] Calypso" by [Peter von] Winter, pp. 74-77; "The spirit song," [H 26a, no. 41] by [Franz Joseph] Haydn, pp. 77-80; Aria, "Adelaide," [op. 46] by [Ludwig van] Beethoven, pp. 81-87; Madrigal, "Fair! sweet! cruel! Why dost thou fly me?" by [Thomas] Ford, pp. 88-91; Rondo, "While the lads in the village," from the opera "The quaker" by [Charles] Dibdin, pp. 92-95; Glee, "Peace to the souls of the heroes!" by Dr. [William Hutchins] Callcott, pp. 96-100; Cavatina, "Lungi dal caro bene," in the opera "Giulio Sabino" by [Giuseppe] Sarti, pp. 101-103; Duet, "Hark! my Daridear!" from [John] Dryden's tragedy "Tyrannick love" (i.e., The royal martyr) by [Henri] Purcell, pp. [104]-111; Song, "Her image ever rose to view" from the opera "Nettley Abbey" by [Carl Friedrich] Baumgarten, pp. 112-115; Prize glee, "A gen'rous friendship no cold medium knows" by [Samuel] Webbe, pp. 116-117; Song, "There the silver'd waters roam" from the opera "The pirates" by [Stephen] Storace, 118-120; Song, "From glaring show and giddy noise" by [Samuel] Webbe, pp. 121-[123]; Round, "I loved thee beautiful and kind" by [Jonathan] Battishill, p. 124; Catch, "O let the merry peal go on!" by [John] Danby, p. 125; Duetto, "Guarda qui, che lo vedrai" by [Joseph] Haydn, p. 126-131; Song "On board the valiant!" from the comic opera "The shipwreck" by Dr. [Samuel] Arnold, pp. 132-133; Prize glee, "Return, blest days" by John Stafford Smith, pp. 134-137; Romanza, Una furtive lagrima" from the comic opera "L'Elisire d'amore" by [Gaetano] Donizetti, pp. 138-140; Madrigal, "Ev'ry bush new springing" by Michael Cavendish, pp. 141-[144]; Duettino, "When first I saw thee graceful move" by Nicolo Pasquali, p. 145; Aria, "Per pieta, non ricercate" in the opera "Il curioso indiscreto" by [Wolfgang Amadeus] Mozart, pp. 146-149; Duet, "Amor gioie mi porge" [music by George Frideric] Handel, pp. [150]-153; Elegy, "While grief and anguish rack my breast" from "Selima and Azor" by Thomas Linley, pp. 154-155; Song, "Light as thistle-down" from the opera "Rosina" by [William] Shield, pp. 156-157; Son, "Fair Liela" by [William] Linley, pp. 158-160; Duetto, "Io lo so" [i.e., Canzonetta: Io lo so, che il bel sembiante, W H4] by Johann Christian Bach, pp. 161-163; Ariette, "Oiseaux, si tous les ans" [K.307/K.284d] by [Wolfgang Amadeus] Mozart, pp. 164-165; "The waits" by Jeremiah Savile, p. [166]; General index to the vocal music, with short biographical notices, pp. [167]-172; General index arranged according to the titles and also the first words ..., pp. [173]-174. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39290/
The musical library, vocal
This is a digital copy of volumes 1 and 2 of "The musical library," a bound collection of part songs and songs with piano accompaniment edited by William Ayrton. It includes arrangements of famous nineteenth-century tunes, madrigals, ballads, canzones, elegies, and opera arias by various composers. The contents of each volume are given below: Vol. 1 Madrigal, “Awake, sweet love!” by John Dowland, pp. 1-3; Song, “Forgive me,” composed to German words by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 4-5; Song, “Beneath the ocean’s swelling wave” from [Giovanni] Pacini’s opera “Niobe,” pp. 6-7; Duet, “Come opprima” from the opera “Enea nel Lazio” by [Vicenzo] Righini, pp. [8]-10; Song, “The kiss, dear maid! thy lip has left” by Felix Mendelssohn, p. 11; Glee, “Forgive, blest shade!” by Dr. [William Hutchins] Callcott, pp. 12-13; Song, “Toll, toll the knell” from the opera “Mahmoud” by Stephen Storace, pp. 14-[16]; Duet, “Two daughters of this aged stream are we” from the masque “King Arthur” by [Henry] Purcell, pp. 17-19; Song, “How deep the slumber of the floods!” by Carl Löwe, p. 20; Serenade, “Good morning” by [Wolfgang Amadeus] Mozart, p. 21; Song, “Jephtha’s daughter” by Carl Löwe, pp. 22-24; Canzonet, “Recollection” by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 25-27; Madrigal, “When flow’ry meadows deck the year” by [Giovanni Pierluigi da] Palestrina, pp. 28-31; Song, “O! sing unto roundelay” by Stephen Paxton, p. 32; Duet, “Love in thine eyes for ever plays” by [William] Jackson, pp. 33-35; Song, [“Thy voice is sweet, is sad, is clear”] originally set to German words by the chevalier [Sigismond] Neükomm, pp. 36-37; Glee, “Hark! the lark at heav’n’s gate sings” by Dr. [Benjamin] Cooke, pp. 38-40; Canzonet, “The marmaid’s song” by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 41-43; Aria, “Deh calma, o ciel!” from the last scene in “Otello” by [Gioachino] Rossini, pp. 44-45; Round, “Winde, gentle evergreen” by Dr. William Hayes, p. 45; Cantata, “Mad Tom” by [Henry] Purcell, pp. 46-49; Madrigal, “As fair as morn, and fresh as May” by John Wilbye, pp. 50-52; “The hermitage” by [Carl Ludwig] Drobisch, p. 53; “Romance” from the German opera “Euryanthe” by [Carl Maria von] Weber, pp. 54-55; Glee, “The May-Fly” by Dr. [William Hutchins] Callcott, pp. 56-60; Arietta, “Ah! Non lasciarmi nò” by Bonifazio Asioli, p.61; Canzonet, “My wife’s a winsome wee thing” by [Ludwig van] Beethoven, pp. 62-63; Canzonet, [“Schäferlied,” Hob. XXVIa:27] by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 64-65; Prize glee, “Here in cool Grot” by [Garret Colley Wesley], the Earl of Mornington, pp. 66-68; Duet, “Time has not thinn’d my flowing hair” by [William] Jackson, pp. 69-71; Aria, “With verdure clad” from [Joseph] Haydn’s “Creation,” pp. 72-76; Song, “Adieu, ye streams!” by [Carl Gottlieb] Reissiger, p. 77; Glee, “Ne’er trouible thyself with the times” by Matthew Lock, pp. 78-79; Song, “The woodman” by T. Linley, sen., pp. 80-81; Canzonet, “Pleasing pain” [Hob. XXVIa:29] by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 82-84; Quartet, “Five times by the Taper’s light” from [the opera] “The iron chest” by Stephen Storace, pp. 85- pp. 85-87; Canzonet, “Pretty fairy!” by Miss Mary Linwood, pp. 88-90; Invocation, “Giusto ciel in tal periglio” transferred to [the opera] “L’Assedio di Corinto” by [Gioachino] Rossini, pp. 91-92; Round, “How great is the pleasure” by Henry Harrington, p. 92; Madrigal, “Now, o now, I needs must part, [John] Dowland, pp. 93-95 “Air” from the opera Les deux journées by [Luigi] Cherubini, pp. 96-97; “Round,” (anon., 1834), p. 97; Aria, “La Rachelina” from [the opera] “La molinara” by [Giovanni] Paisiello, pp. 98-100; Canzonet, “Despair,” [Hob. XXVIa:28] by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 101-103; Song, “The self-banished” by Dr. [John] Blow, p. 104; Canzonet, “To my boat” by [Sigismond] Neükomm, pp. 105-107; Glee, “Fear no more the heat of the sun” by Dr. [James] Nares, pp. 108-111; Canzonetta, “Cara Lisa” by Carl Gottlieb] Reissiger, p. 112; Arietta, “Bella Ciprignia” by Francesco Pollini, p. 113; Cantata, “Mad Bess” by [Henry] Purcell, pp. 114-117; Madrigal, “The silver swan” by Orlando Gibbons, pp. 118-119; Portuguese “Modhina,” by [Joaquim Manoel] Gago da Camera, [arr. by Sigismond Neükomm], p. 120; Air, “Charmante Gabrielle” by [Eustache Ducaurroy], p. 121; Canzonet, “Fidelity,” [Hob. XXVIa:30] by [Jospeh] Haydn, pp. 122-125; Duet, “As I saw fair Clora walk alone” by [George] Hayden, pp. 126-128; Round, “Sweet enslaver” by [Luffmann] Atterbury, p. 128; Glee, “The fairies” by Dr. [William Hutchins] Callcott, pp. 129-131; Aria, “The husbandman” from [Joseph] Haydn’s “Seasons,” pp. 132-135; “May song,” by [Ludwig van] Beethoven, pp. 136-137; “Tweed-side” by Joseph Corfe, pp. 138-140; Duet, “When the moonlight streaming,” founded on the old French air, “Le clair de la lune” by [Rouennais Adrien] Boieldieu, pp. 141-143; Pastoral ballade, “Hebe”, by [Thomas Augustine] Arne, pp. 144-145; Aria, “Per pieta non dirmi addio,” [op.65] by [Ludwig van] Beethoven, [arr.], pp. 146-148; Canzonet, “Sympathy,” [Hob. XXVIa:33] by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 149-151; Song, “Ada to Alexis, with a rose” by [Friedrich Heinrich] Himmel, pp. 152-153; Glee, “Health to my dear!” by [Reginald] Spofforth, pp. 154-[156]; Duet, “Could a man be secure” by [Starling Goodwin], pp. 157-159; Aria, “Non vi turbate, no,” [from the opera “Alceste” by Christoph Willibald von] Gluck, pp. 160-161; Madrigal, [“Out upon it”] by [Giovanni] Giacomo Gastoldi, pp. 162-163; Modinha, “As fades the morn,” [by Joaquim Manoel Gago da Camera; arr. by Sigismond Neükomm], p. 164; Canzonet, “The wanderer,” [Hob. XXVIa:32 ] by [Jospeh] Haydn, pp. 165-167; Glee, “Adieu to the village delights” by [Joseph] Baildon, pp. 168-169; Bolero, “Son Gelsomino” by [Gaetano B.] Piantanida, pp. 170-172; Vol. 2 [Table of] Contents with composers named alphabetically arranged; Cavatina, “Winter” from [Joseph] Haydn’s “Seasons,” p. 1; Son, “What makes the poor bosom” by [Louis] Spohr, pp. 2-3; Canzonet, “Soft Cupid, wanton, am’rous boy” by [John] Travers, pp. 4-8; Scena e duetto, “Parto! ti lascio, addio!” by Simone Mäyer, pp. 9-13; Ballad, “Sally in our alley” by Henry Carey, pp. 14-16; Glee, “Lighty tread, ‘tis hallowed ground,” [composed by John Scotland; arr. by George] Berg, p. 17; Canzonet, “Piercing eyes,” [Hob. XXVIa:35 ] by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 18-19; “La Marmotte, or The Savoyard-boy’s song,” [i.e., "Marmotte", op. 52, no. 7 by Ludwig van] Beethoven, p. 20; Canzonetta, “Nizza, je puis sans peine” by [Gioachino] Rossini, pp. 21-23; Madrigal, “Return, return, my lovely maid” by [Garret Colley Wesley], the Earl of Mornington, pp. 24-27; Song, “O, gentle maid” by [Tommaso] Giordani, pp. 28-29; Air, “Where-e’er you walk” by [George Frideric] Handel, pp. 30-31; Glee, “The sun shines fair on Carlisle wall” by William Horsley, pp. 32-36; Romanza, “L’ombrosa note, vien!” from the opera “Matilde von Guise” by [Johann Nepomuk] Hummel, p. 37; Canzonet, “She never told her love,” [Hob. XXVIa:34] by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 38-39; Glee, “You gave me your heart” by [Samuel] Webbe, pp. 41; Air, “Blow, blow, thou winter wind” by [Thomas] Arne and [Thomas] Linley, pp. 42-44; “The death song of the Cherokee Indian” [words] written and adapted by Miss [Ann] Home (afterward Mrs. John Hunter), [harmonized melody from “Scottish songs” (1869) by Joseph Ritson], p. 45; Duet, “Still confiding” (Folg’ dem Freunde) from the opera “Faust” by [Louis] Spohr, pp. 46-49; Song, “Down the river” from the [opera] “The iron chest” by [Stephen] Storace, pp. 50-51; Aria, “Rendi ‘l sereno al ciglio” from the opera “Sosarme” by [George Frideric] Handel, p. 52; Song, “Young spring-gods are round us flying,” [from “Gesänge von Goethe,” op. 83, no. 3] by [Ludwig van] Beethoven, pp. 53-55; Song, “O nanny, wilt thou gang with me?” by [Thomas] Carter, pp. 56-57; May song, “Hail! all hail! Thou merry month of May” by C. M. von Weber, pp. 58-59; Air, “Love in her eyes sits playing” from the serenata of “Acis and Galatea” by [George Frideric] Handel, pp. 60-61; Trio, “The flocks shall leave the mountains” from the same [i.e., Acis and Galatea] by [George Frideric] Handel, pp. 62-65; Air, “Heart, the seat of soft delight” from the same [i.e., Acis and Galatea] by [George Frideric] Handel, pp. 66-68; Madrigal, “Now is the month of Maying” by [Thomas] Morley, p. 69; Aria and Coro, “Lieti fiori, ombrose piante” from the opera “Il ratto de Proserpina” by [Pietro] Winter, p. 70-72; Canzonet, “Go, lovely rose” by [Thomas] Attwood, pp. 73-75; Glee, “Harold the valiant” by [Dr. William Hutchins] Callcott, pp. 76-79; Arietta, “Se resto sul lido” by Bonifazion Asioli, p. [80]; Cavatina, “Il pensier stà negli” from [Joseph] Haydn’s opera “Orfeo e Euridice,” pp. 81-83; Canzonet, “Say not that minutes swiftly move” by [Johann Peter] Salomon, pp. 84-85; Ballad, “Black-eyed Susan” by [Richard] Leveridge, pp. 86-88; German song, “Ich liebe dich” by [Carl] Eberwein, p. 89; Madrigal, “Flora gave me fairest flowers” by John Wilbye, pp. 90-93; Aria, “Verdi prati” from the opera “Alcina” by [George Frideric] Handel, pp. 94-95; Duet, “Why should mortals sigh for gold?” by Dr. [James] Nares, pp. 96-99; Song, “The streamlet” from the opera “The woodman,” [music by William] Shield, pp. 100-101; Song, “The parting,” adapted to an air in [Vicenzo] Bellini’s opera “La straniera,” pp. 102-104; Glee, “The fairest flowers the vale prefer” by [John] Danby, pp. 105-107; Quartet, “How strange does all appear!” from [Ludwig van] Beethoven’s [opera] “Fidelio,” pp. 108-112; Cavatina, “Joy has fled, and all is cheerless” [from Beethoven’s opera] “Fidelio,” pp. 112-113; Duet, “Oh more, far more than mortal pleasure” [from Beethoven’s opera] “Fidelio,” pp. 114-119; Canzonet, “Go, gentle gales” by [William] Jackson (of Exeter), pp. 120-123; Air, “La danse n’est pas ce que j’aime” from the opera “Richard coeur-de-lion” by [André Ernest Modeste Grétry], p. 124; Chorus, “Come, gentle spring!” from “Seasons” by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 125-131; Song, “When I roved, a young highlander!” by [Adalbert] Gyrowetz, pp. 132-133; Glee, “Go, happy heart” by William Horsley, pp. 134-135; Song, “Tell me, lovely shepherd” by [William] Boyce, pp. 136-137; Duet, “Deh! ti conforta, o cara” from “Il matrimonio segreto” by [Domenico] Cimarosa, pp. 138-142; Romance, “Ah! lorsque la mort” from [Etienne Henry] Mehul’s “Joseph” [ i.e., the opera “La legend de Joseph”], pp. 142-144; Canzonet, “O tuneful voice!,” [Hob. XXVIa: 42] by [Joseph] Haydn, pp. 145-149; Glee, “Tell me, then, the reason why?” by [Luffmann] Atterbury, pp. 150-151; Cavatina, “Soave imagine d’amour” by [Saverino] Mercadante, pp. 152-153; Canzonet, “Hast, my Nannette” by [John] Travers, pp. 154-159; Madrigal, “Since I first saw your face” by [Thomas] Ford, pp. 160-161; Canzonet, “I told my nymph, I told her true,” op. 13 by [John Julius] Graeff, pp. 162-164. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39288/
The musick for the Royal fireworks
This is a [ca. 1788] score of one of the arrangements Handel made of his "Music for the Royal Fireworks." The caption title gives indication that this version contains the music as performed in 1749. The Grove Dictionary of Music lists two other arrangements from ca. 1746. The performance forces of this edition include: trumpets (3), horns (3), timpani, oboes (2), bassoon, and strings (violin, viola, violoncello, and contrabass). The plate no. appears in both Roman and Arabic forms: No. XXIV and No. 24. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11801/
Nouvelles parodies bachiques, mélées de vaudevilles ou ronde de table
This a copy of vol. 2 of an anthology of French songs compiled by Christophe Ballad, music publisher of King Louis XIV. The work consists mainly of unaccompanied melodies with underlaid text for selected acts of the following tragedies: Proserpine (pp. 1-19); Le triomphe de l'amour (pp. 20-60); Persée (pp. 61-81); Phaeton (pp. 62-94); Amadis (pp. 95-125); Roland (pp. 126-155); Armide (pp. 169-176); Acis et Galatée (pp. 177-192). It contains also melodies for "Ballet du temple de la Paix" (pp. 156-168), and Vaudevilles on rondes de table (pp. 193-264). Two previous editions, compiled by Monsieur Ribon, published under title: Parodies bachiques. Cf. RISM, v. B I, 1 1695(4) and 1696(1), present ed. listed as 1700(3). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25959/
Nouvelles Poesies Morales sur Les Plus Beaux Airs de la Musique Francoise et Italienne avec la Basse.: Fables Choisies Dans le gout de M. De La Fontaine, Sur des Vaudevilles & petits Airs aisés à chanter, avec leur Basse & une Basse en Musette. Recueil I. 6 liv. broché.
This score is a collection of poetry and set to music including moral fables (marked on the table of contents with an asterisk). Each piece has words written with musical lines in treble, bass, or a combination of both. Includes a preface ('Avis.') and table of contents for the movements prior to page 1 for each of the seven collections ('recueil'). The pagination restarts for each collection and for the fables which fall at the end of each section. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6497/
The Occasional : an Oratorio in Score Composed by Mr. Handel
A sacred oratorio for mixed chorus (SATB) and orchestra (2 violins, viola, "principale", 2 oboes, 2 trumpets, timpani, and continuo). The score includes a list of subscribers and an index for each of the three sections of the oratorio. The anthem "God save the King" is included on pp. 164-26, each page bearing an additional sequence number from 14-26. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11079/
Ode on St. Cecilia's Day
A sacred work for mixed chorus (SATB) with orchestra acc. (2 oboes, 2 violins, viola, and basso continuo). A contents index is given on p. 74. Plate no. 105. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11080/
Oeuvres de M. Vade, ou recueil des opera-comiques, & parodies qu'il a donnes depuis quelques annees; avec les airs, rondes, & vaudevilles notes; & autres ouvrages du meme auteur.
Jean-Joseph Vadé’s popularity as a composer and librettist is evident in the publication of his collected works, which first appeared in 1755 but was expanded in 1758, a year after his death. Vadé’s œuvre consists of mostly opéras comiques, some with original music rather than preexisting tunes. The collected works editions include fictional correspondence and poetry. Vadé’s interest in capturing the bustling atmosphere of fish markets is evident in such works as Les quatre bouquets poissards and the poem La pipe cassée, which is classified as a “poëme epitragipoissardiheroicomique.” Melodies for operatic airs are also printed in this volume. Although Vadé claimed authorship of the music, some were familiar tunes that had existed before Vadé appropriated them. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc80/
Omphale, tragedie en musique
Omphale (1701) is one of Destouches’s contributions to the Lullian genre of the five-act tragédie en musique. Half a century after the premiere, Friedrich Melchior Grimm targeted the opera in his pamphlet “Lettre sur Omphale” (1752), which continued the earlier debate between advocates of Lully and Rameau. This written attack also precipitated the famous guerre des bouffons, which was sparked by a performance of Pergolesi’s La serva padrona (1733) in 1752. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6/
[Operas]
This is the second of a two-volume collection containing the basso continuo accompaniment to melodies from these 17th - 18th century operas: Des quatre saisons (p.1); Roland (p.16); Hesione (p.39); Persée (p.58); L'Europe galante (p.76); Amadis de Gaules (p.107); Issé (p.126); Phaéton (p.134). The manuscript contains cues for instruments, choruses, and characters of the opera. Most of the melodies are dances of the era: minuets, saraband, passacaglia, march; rondeau, boureé, gavotte, gigue, and canaries. The hard leather cover of the library's copy includes the titles of the operas and the statement, "Apartenant à M[onsieu]r de Pimont" (i.e, belonging to Mr. De Pimont). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25962/
[Operas]
This is the first of a two-volume collection of melodies from these 17th - 18th century operas: Des quatre saisons (p.1); Roland (p.12); Hesione (p.29); Persée (p.46); L'Europe galante (p.61); Amadis de Gaules (p.83); Issé (p.101); Phaéton (p.108). The manuscript contains cues for instruments, choruses, and characters of the opera. Most of the melodies are dances of the era: minuets, saraband, passacaglia, march; rondeau, boureé, gavotte, gigue, and canaries. The hard leather cover of the library's copy includes the titles of the operas and the statement, "Apartenant à M[onsieu]r de Pimont" (i.e, belonging to Mr. De Pimont). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25961/
Orfeo ed Euridice
This is the libretto of "Orfeo ed Euridice" by Ranieri de Calzabigi, published in vol 2 of "Raccolta di melodrammi serj scritti nel secolo XVIII." The original volume contains works by Apostolo Zeno, Giuseppe Parini, Marco Coltellini, Castone Rezzonico della Torre, Ranieri de Calsabigi, and F. Saverio de Rogati. On the back of the t.p. appears a quote in Virgil's "Georg.," iv, 465: "Te dulcis conjux, te solo in littore mecum, te veniente die, te discedente canebam." The libretto includes a prologue and list of characters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25951/
Orphée et Euridice; tragédie; opéra en trois actes
The Viennese premiere of Orfeo was extremely well received, and Gluck decided to revise the opera as Orphée et Eurydice for Paris in 1774, with the French adaptation and additions provided by Pierre Louis Moline. The role of Orpheus was lowered slightly for an haute-contre singer (a male operatic voice type more in line with an alto range), adhering to French preferences. The opera was lengthened, to create a more magnificent spectacle, with extra arias, ensembles, and instrumental numbers. Gluck also modified the orchestration to accommodate the orchestra at the Académie Royale de Musique. This version, Orphée et Eurydice, became one of the most popular operas in France. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc16/
The Padlock
This is a copy of a ca. 1768 edition of Isaac Bickerstaff libretto for the two-act English comic opera "The Paddlock" by Charles Dibdin. The plot is an adaptation of Miguel de Cervantes's "El celoso extremeño" (translated as, The Jealous Estremaduran). The t.p. features a vignette signed by IJ Taylor [possibly by the London engraver Isaac Taylor (1730-1807)] with four infants. The one at the center is holding several keys and is playing horse riding with a walking stick that has a padlock attached to it. In the story, Don Diego, a rich old man, hopes to marry the young Leonora and locks her inside his house using a large padlock on the front door. After bribing the servants, the younger suitor, Leander, climbs over the garden wall to court Leonora. Don Diego returns unexpectedly and catches the lovers, but allows the young couple to wed acknowledging that he is too old for Leonora. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31510/
Panurge dans l'Isle des Lanternes : comédie lirique en trois actes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc21/
Persée : tragedie
King Louis XIV's involvement in campaigns against the Dutch/Swedish alliance in early 1682 prevented him from attending the premiere of Persée in April of that year. As was customary in the operas of composer Jean-Baptiste Lully and librettist Philippe Quinault, the prologue included references to current battlefield exploits and portrayed the king as a paragon of virtue. The prologues of previous Lully operas emphasized glory and prowess over virtue; the change in emphasis in Persée may have resulted from the increased influence of Madame de Maintenon (the king's new mistress) in the court and her pension for decorum. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60/
Phaeton
Libretto of the opera "Phaeton," by Philippe Quinolt. The plot is based on an episode in Ovid's Metamorphoses. In the plot, Phaethon, son of Climène and Soleil [the Sun], is filled with excessive ambition and pride. He abandons his beloved, Théone, and requests to the King of Egypt the hand of his daughter Libie. Climène, who after consulting the sea god Proteus knows of the demise that her son's avarice will bring upon himself, tries in vain to discourage his ambition for the throne of Egypt and urges him to renew his love for Theona. However, Phaeton goaded by the taunts of his rival, Epaphus, rides recklessly across the sky in his father's chariot. The spectacular ending includes Jupiter's thunderbolts aimed at stopping Phaethon's wild ride, and Phaethon crashing onto earth where he dies. An ensemble and chorus provide a sorrowful denouement. On the title page for this opera, there is a lithograph illustration of the god Apollo holding a lyre and the goddess Euterpe playing a stringed instrument that resembles a guitar. It also depicts the fleur de lis, and on the background, an allegorical image Louis XIV, the Sun King. It also includes an engraved frontispiece titled, "Le trébuchement de Phaeton" (The Fall of Phaeton) by Jean le Pautre. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39283/
Phaëton : tragédie mise en musique
Like many of the operas created by composer Jean-Baptiste Lully and Philippe Quinault, his favorite librettist, Phaëton is filled with solar symbolism--a reference to the "Sun King," Louis XIV. The story also provides a political lesson: the haughty youth unable to contend with his position of power served as a warning to anyone brash enough to challenge the rigid mores of Louis' court. In addition to this political interpretation, the story is also a character study of a reckless juvenile whose arrogance destroys him. Phaëton's misguided and inappropriate attempts to make his lineage public bring about his downfall. The plot, like that of several of Lully's operas, is based on an episode in Ovid's Metamorphoses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61/
Phaëton. Tragedie mise en musique
Like many of the operas created by composer Jean-Baptiste Lully and Philippe Quinault, his favorite librettist, Phaëton is filled with solar symbolism--a reference to the "Sun King," Louis XIV. The story also provides a political lesson: the haughty youth unable to contend with his position of power served as a warning to anyone brash enough to challenge the rigid mores of Louis' court. In addition to this political interpretation, the story is also a character study of a reckless juvenile whose arrogance destroys him. Phaëton's misguided and inappropriate attempts to make his lineage public bring about his downfall. The plot, like that of several of Lully's operas, is based on an episode in Ovid's Metamorphoses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62/
Le piacevoli poesie
This is a ca. 1750 copy of "Le piacevoli poesie di Giuseppe Baretti" (The Pleasing Poetry of Giuseppe Baretti). Although Baretti is primarily remembered for his frequent travels throughout Italy, England, France, and Portugal, which he recounted in his "Lettere familiari ai suoi tre fratelli," he was also a scholar, linguist, poet, translator, and journalist. He wrote "Le piacevoli poesie di Giuseppe Baretti" in 1750. The poetry imitated the style of Fancesco Berni, a 16th-century Italian poet who wrote parodies and burlesque letters-much of it obscene in nature. The introduction of this work was written by the Venetian Count Gasparo Gozzi, himself a poet, prose writer, journalist, critic, and also the brother of Baretti's friend, Carlo Gozzi. The library's copy of "Le piacevoli poesie" is bound with the following librettos: "Ifigenia in Aulide" by Vittorio Amedeo Cigna-Santi; “Catone in Utica,” by Pietro Metastasio; "Sofonisba" by Mattia Verazi; and "Arianne e Teseo" by Pietro Pariati. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39296/
Pigmalion
This is the 1773 edition of the libretto to the comic opera and vaudeville, "Pigmalion" by Charles-François Panard and Thomas Laffichard. The opera premiered at the Paris Opéra Comique in 1735 . The plot is an adaptation of Ovid's story of Pygmalion, a sculptor who fell in love with a statue that he carved. Operatic and ballet representation of the subject of Pigmalion (or Pygmalion) became famous after Antoine Houdar de la Motte's entrée "La sculpture" for the ballet "Le triomphe des arts," which staged in 1700 at Académie Royale de Musique with music by Michel de la Barre. Page 16 of this edition was incorrectly numbered as number 10. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31513/
Plain and easy introduction to practical music
In 1597, while Morley was negotiating for the patent, he wrote his musical treatise, A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke. Although his preface contains the statement that he had “nothing better to do,” Morley probably knew publishing a treatise on the science of music would boost public interest in purchasing musical works. In addition, by publishing such a work, the English audience would view Morley as an authority in music (and he would become more likely to obtain the patent) (Smith, “Print Culture and the Elizabethan Composer,” 163). The work is practical, and is organized into three sections: teaching to sing simple song, teaching to sing two parts over a plainsong or ground, and teaching counterpoint. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86/
Platée : comédie-ballet
Jacques Autreau’s play Platée, ou Junon jalouse was based on a story by a second-century Greek author named Pausanias who chronicled his travels (including rituals and traditions) in ten books that represent the different regions of Greece. At the time Le Valois d’Orville appropriated Autreau’s drama for a libretto, it was uncommon for French court operas to include comic features, and even Autreau’s spoken play lacked the comic tone of the opera. Yet, the humor extends beyond the plot; for instance, the sounds of frogs and birds are represented instrumentally. Platée was first performed at Versailles for the wedding of the dauphin and Princess Maria Theresa of Spain in 1745. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc38/
Prattica di musica, utile et necessaria si al compositore per comporre i canti suoi regolatamente, si anco al cantore per assicurarsi in tutte le cose cantabili
This book is the first part of Lodovico Zacconi's "Prattica di musica," published in 1596. The contents of this book are divided in four parts covering: the history of music, definition of musical terms, introduction to musical notation, modes, time and prolation, rules of counterpoint, musica ficta, classification of musical instruments, and proper manner of singing polyphonic works and musical ornaments. A second part, "Prattica di musica seconda parte," was published in Venice in 1622. The library's copy contains the following pagination errors: leaves 30, 67, 124, 130, 134, 188 were numbered incorrectly as 29, 140, 130, 122, 130, 194, respectively. There are two leaves numbered 50, each containing the parts for the alto, bass and tenor with underlaid text "Beatus author seculi" and "Residuo." Each leaf is preceded by another leaf that contains the singing parts for the cantus, quintus and tenor. These are two versions of a polyphonic setting, in duple time and triple mensuration, respectively. In the second example, the words Gloria tibi domine" appear under the cantus and quintus. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25960/
Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune
This is the orchestral score of Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune. The copy was presented to Edouard Colonne with the inscription by the composer on the title page, "à Monsieur E. Colonne en hommage d'infinie gratitude artistique, Claude Debussy, Oct. 1895." The score contains performance markings in pen, pencil and crayon; possibly by Colonne. In original green wrapper. Preserved in green cloth-and-marbled-paper chemise with matching slipcase. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11081/
Prima la musica e poi le parole
This is a copy of Giovanni Battista Casti's libretto for the comic opera "Prima la musica e poi le parole". On the back of the t.p. appears a list of characters and names Antonio Salieri as the composer of the music. The one-act opera was commissioned by Emperor Joseph II. Members of the Burgtheater's Italian troupe premiered it at the Schönbrunn Palace on February 7, 1786. The library's copy is bound with the libretto of Zaccaria Valaresso's "Rutzvanscad, il giovine." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25963/
Proserpine
Libretto of the opera "Proserpine," by Philippe Quinolt; the plot is based on the story of the abduction of Proserpine and her descent into Hades, and also on Ovid's Metamorphoses, its original source. In the plot, Cerés, the goddess of the earth, summons the nymph Aréthuse to guard her daughter Proserpine. Aréthuse protests, and tells Cerés of her love for Alphée, the river god, but the anxious mother warns her she should not let her own feelings interfere with the assigned task. Alphée assumes that Aréthuse abandoned him to look after Proserpine. Taking advantage of the situation, Ascalaphe, Pluto's envoy, encourages Alphée's belief in Aréthuse's supposed infidelity; then, persuades both Alphée and Aréthuse into letting Pluto watch over Proserpine. Alphée and Aréthuse agree and as the lovers' attention wanders, Pluto seizes Proserpine and abducts her. Cerés learns of her daughter's abduction and in despair decides to withhold her gifts that give earth prosperity. When Alphée and Aréthuse finally reach Proserpine, they find that she has already eaten of the grain and tasted the fruit of the underworld, which condemned her to Pluto's control. Proserpine begs Pluto for mercy, but the love-stricken god refuses to free her. Pluto summons his judges and three furies, who support his claim to keep Proserpine with him, even at the cost of bringing devastation to earth. As Cerés laments, Alphée and Aréthuse approach to tell her that Proserpine is held by Pluto and that she is now the queen of the underworld. Cerés calls Jupiter and demands the return of daughter. Mercure descends and tells Cerés that the gods heard her plea and reached a compromise to allow Proserpine to be Pluto's wife and queen, while spending several months of each year with her mother. The title page contains a lithograph illustration of a winged young Pluto wearing a crown and ridding a horse chariot while holding a two-pronged spear. It includes an engraved frontispiece titled, "Proserpine" by Jean le Pautre. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39284/
Proserpine; tragedie
With Proserpine, composer Jean-Baptiste Lully returned to his collaboration with librettist Philippe Quinault, which had been interrupted when the poet was banned from Court for offending Madame de Montespan (the king's mistress) with unflattering references in Isis. By 1679, Quinault had been restored to favor. Proserpine was first performed at St. Germain-en-Laye in February of 1680. Though seventeenth-century audiences were familiar with the story of Proserpine being carried off into Hades from numerous ballets and stage plays, Quinault returned to the source in Ovid's Metamorphoses to embellish the plot. In addition to details drawn from Ovid, Quinault added some of his own, making Proserpine among the most convoluted of Lully's operas. While the prologue alludes to King Louis XIV in the guise of Jupiter, the play itself refers specifically to the king's recent victories over the Spanish and Dutch when Jupiter battles and defeats the giants. Robert Isherwood notes that Jupiter's trip to Phrygia may represent Louis' inspection of Flanders after its defeat in 1679. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63/
Proserpine, tragedie en musique
This is a copy of the libretto of "Proserpine," a tragedy in five acts by Phillipe Quinault. The tragedy was set to music by Jean Baptiste Lully, superintendent chamber composer of the court of Louis XIV, and performed in the King's presence at Saint Germain-en-Laye on February, [3] 1680. The month and year of the opera premiere are indicated on the t.p., but the day of performance was left out with a blank space. The library's copy shows errors in pagination. The number of p. 25 was scribbled with ink and rendered illegible. A second p.66 should read p. 67, and the last page of the libretto, numbered 70, should be p. 68. The libretto contains an engraving of one of the stage settings by J. Le Pautre, after a design by J. Berain. The item contains a prologue and list of characters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25964/
Proserpine : tragedie mise en musique
With Proserpine, composer Jean-Baptiste Lully returned to his collaboration with librettist Philippe Quinault, which had been interrupted when the poet was banned from Court for offending Madame de Montespan (the king's mistress) with unflattering references in Isis. By 1679, Quinault had been restored to favor. Proserpine was first performed at St. Germain-en-Laye in February of 1680. Though seventeenth-century audiences were familiar with the story of Proserpine being carried off into Hades from numerous ballets and stage plays, Quinault returned to the source in Ovid's Metamorphoses to embellish the plot. In addition to details drawn from Ovid, Quinault added some of his own, making Proserpine among the most convoluted of Lully's operas. While the prologue alludes to King Louis XIV in the guise of Jupiter, the play itself refers specifically to the king's recent victories over the Spanish and Dutch when Jupiter battles and defeats the giants. Robert Isherwood notes that Jupiter's trip to Phrygia may represent Louis' inspection of Flanders after its defeat in 1679. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64/
Recueil d'airs serieux et a boire de differents auteurs : pour l'année 1701.
Contains songs by various composers with figured bass. French or Italian words. Issued in 12 monthly installments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65/
Recueil d'opera
Collection of opera excerpts in manuscript (in an unidentified hand). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1690/
Renaud : tragedie lyrique en trois actes
Sacchini’s first opera for the French stage was Renaud. Although he had the support of Marie Antoinette, Sacchini quickly learned that foreign (especially Italian) composers in Paris faced difficulties. The premiere of Renaud was intentionally delayed in an attempt to highlight Sacchini’s privilege with the queen, and the opera did not enjoy immediate success, even from Piccinni’s supporters. However, Renaud went on to be performed frequently, appearing as late as 1815. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc43/
Richard Cœur de Lion : opéra comique en trois actes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc22/
Roland
Libretto of the opera "Roland" by Philippe Quinault; he based the plot of Roland on medieval legends of chivalry, setting episodes from Ludovico Ariosto's epic poem "Orlando furioso." Roland centers on the conflict between duty and love and the intervention of goddesses. This copy includes includes handwritten annotations of performers' names, and a frontispiece engraving undersigned by Jean Dolivar (i.e., Juan Dolivar) that illustrates one of the scenes from the opera. Jean-Baptiste Lully composed the music of the opera which premiered on January 8, 1685. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39287/
Roland. Tragédie mis en musique
Roland is one of three operas by composer Jean-Baptiste Lully and librettist Philippe Quinault based on the medieval legends of chivalry (the other two are Amadis and Armide). This is the second edition. Roland sets episodes from Ludovico Ariosto's Orlando furioso. And, like its sibling Armide, Roland centers on the conflict between duty and love. Acts I-III portray this conflict within Angélique, Queen of Cathay, while the remaining acts concern Roland's unrequited love for Angélique, which is resolved only when the goddesses Glory and Fame show him that this too is a struggle between duty and love. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc68/
Roland; tragédie mise en musique
Roland is one of three operas by composer Jean-Baptiste Lully and librettist Philippe Quinault based on the medieval legends of chivalry (the other two are Amadis and Armide). Roland sets episodes from Ludovico Ariosto's Orlando furioso. And, like its sibling Armide, Roland centers on the conflict between duty and love. Acts I-III portray this conflict within Angélique, Queen of Cathay, while the remaining acts concern Roland's unrequited love for Angélique, which is resolved only when the goddesses Glory and Fame show him that this too is a struggle between duty and love. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66/