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Kirchen und Hauss Gesänge, 2. Teil
This tenor partbook opens with several dedications followed by a letter of commendation for the entire set of Newer Kirchen- und Hauss-Gesänge. Songs are listed topically in the Register. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463627/
Artaxerxes. An English opera.
1763 English libretto for Thomas Arne's opera Artaxerxes. Thomas Arne most likely wrote his own libretto for Artaxerxes, which enjoyed a successful run at Covent Garden beginning on 2 February 1762. Artaxerxes follows the structure of Metastasio’s Italian libretto on the same subject; no other English-language opera has been recognized as following the principles of Metastasian opera seria. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1/
Vocal Melody Book IV
This collection of songs from the pantomime "Harlequin Sorcerer" and the play "The Oracle" are scored for various voice types with obbligato instruments and basso continuo (with figured bass). A "Mrs. Cibber" is credited prominently on the title page. Some songs also have alternate parts for the solo line (conflating obbligato and vocal parts) for German flute (sometimes simply designated as "Flute"). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463631/
Love in a Village: a Comic Opera As it is Performed at the Theatre Royal in Covent-Garden. For the Harpsicord, Voice, German Flute, or Violin.
Vocal score for Love in a Village is broken into four labeled sections ('books'), each of which has a separate title page, and includes the music from the comic opera which has figured bass. Some of the music includes underlaid lyrics and the names of the persons who performed the pieces. Table of contents for the entire work is on page [1]. According to Grove Music Online, the opera is the story of a heroine (Rosetta) who runs away from an unhappy marriage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25957/
Thomas and Sally
1782 vocal score of Thomas Arne's opera Thomas and Sally, or the Sailors return. Dramatic pastoral in two acts by Thomas Augustine Arne to a libretto by Isaac Bickerstaff; London, Covent Garden, 28 November 1760. Thomas and Sally can claim to be the first all-sung English comic opera. It is noteworthy as well for the introduction of clarinets into the orchestra (Grove Music Online). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12/
The Musical Library, Vocal: Volumes 1 & 2
This is a digital copy of volumes 1 and 2 of "The musical library," a bound collection of part songs and songs with piano accompaniment edited by William Ayrton. It includes arrangements of famous nineteenth-century tunes, madrigals, ballads, canzones, elegies, and opera arias by various composers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39288/
The Musical Library, Vocal: Volumes 3 & 4
This is a digital copy of volumes 3 and 4 of "The musical library," a bound collection of part songs and songs with piano accompaniment edited by William Ayrton. It includes arrangements of famous nineteenth-century tunes, madrigals, ballads, canzones, elegies, and opera arias by various composers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39290/
Nouvelles parodies bachiques, mélées de vaudevilles ou ronde de table
This a copy of vol. 2 of an anthology of French songs compiled by Christophe Ballad, music publisher of King Louis XIV. The work consists mainly of unaccompanied melodies with underlaid text for selected acts of the following tragedies: Proserpine (pp. 1-19); Le triomphe de l'amour (pp. 20-60); Persée (pp. 61-81); Phaeton (pp. 62-94); Amadis (pp. 95-125); Roland (pp. 126-155); Armide (pp. 169-176); Acis et Galatée (pp. 177-192). It contains also melodies for "Ballet du temple de la Paix" (pp. 156-168), and Vaudevilles on rondes de table (pp. 193-264). Two previous editions, compiled by Monsieur Ribon, published under title: Parodies bachiques. Cf. RISM, v. B I, 1 1695(4) and 1696(1), present ed. listed as 1700(3). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25959/
Variations à quatre mains pour le piano-forte sur une theme de Monsieur le Comte de Waldstein
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673874/
Messa à 4
This a manuscript copy of two Mass movements, Kyrie and Gloria, gathered from a "Messa à 4." The copyist, Vincenso Marchetti, attributed this mass to the composer Matteo Bisso. The texts of both movements of the Mass are divided in several sections and set musically for an ensemble of mixed choir (S.A.T.B), vocal soloists, strings and basso continuo. Each section reflects changes of tonality, tempo, and musical meter. The composer indicated dynamics, the use of muted strings (e.g., p.[84]) and performance indications such as unison and col parte (e.g., p. [76] and p.[79]). The last section for the Chirie [sic] is set musically as a slow fugue in triple meter. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86519/
Prodromus Musicalis
"Prodromus Musicalis" (published in 1702) is bound, here, with "Motets à une et deux voix, mélez de symphonies, livre premier" (1704); thus, the latter gate is used for this item as a unit. Both sets of motets consist of Latin-texted music preceded by a title page in French. A Table of Contents either at the front or back of each collection describes the motets contained therein. Content is printed on both sides of each leaf. "Prodromus" also has a note from Brossard informing the reader that a Dictionary of Music, published at the same time as "Prodomus," contains French translations of Italian, Greek, and Latin terms, knowledge of which is vital to the understanding and performance of the present music. The contents of "Prodromus" are as follows: "Ave vivens hostia," "O Jesu quam dulce," "Congratulamini filiae Sion," "O vos aetherei," "Festivi martyres" "Angele sancte" "Sonitus armorum," "Quemadmodum desiderat," and "O plenus irarum dies." "Motets à une et deux voix" contains the following pieces: "Venite exultemus," "Gaudete Mortales," "Ad mensam caelitus paratam," "Ave Regina coelorum," "Animae Amantes ad Deum esurientes," "Ite gemmae, Ite flores," "Anxiatus est super me spiritus meus," "Festivi Martyres, festivae Virgines," "Nisi Dominus aedificaverit domum." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463636/
Tancrède: tragédie
André Campra’s Tancrède, which premiered on 7 November 1702, is his best-known tragédie en musique, with a run of performances until 1764, and high praise by noteworthy music personalities such as Rameau. While the music critic La Cerf de la Viéville wrote positive comments about Tancrède, he was bothered by the opera’s use of low voices, which defied the tradition of employing castrati parts. Additionally, the role of Clorinda was written for a well-known contralto named Mademoiselle Maupin; although the range is that of a mezzo-soprano, the powerful quality of Maupin’s voice seemed to be a prime consideration for Campra. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc23/
Il primo libro de madrigali a cinque voci
This partbook contains the "quinto" part for "Il Primo Libro de Madrigali a Cinqve Voci, con Tre Sesti, et Tre Dialoghi a Otto, Nouament e da lui Composti, & per Antonio Gardano dati in luce." Carli dedicated his First Book of Madrgials "all' Illustrissimo Signor Conte Alfonso Gonzaga Conte di Nuuolara." A table of contents at the end of the partbook lists the madrigals alphabetically in three categories: five-voice pieces, six voice pieces, and eight-voice dialoghi. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463618/
Walkin' by the River
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
This is a manuscript score of Joseph [Joe] A. Coccia's arrangement for jazz ensemble of the song "Walkin' by the River," by Una Mae Carlisle. It includes chord symbols and sections of the music, dynamics and solo entrances were marked using red pencil. On the back of the last page of the manuscript, there are suggested performance instructions and an alternative ending addressed to Stan [Kenton]. Each page of the manuscript bears the inscription "Stan Kenton Orch." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11082/
Mélomanie : opera comique en un acte en vers mêlé d'ariettes mis en musique
During his early career, Champein was known for church music composed while he worked as music master at the collegiate church in Pignon (in the southern Provence region of France). He moved to Paris and established himself as an operatic composer; La mélomanie (1781) is one of his most famous operas, and it remained in the repertoire at the Opéra-Comique until 1829. La mélomanie actually mocks the debate between French and Italian styles of music, with Fugantini as an Italian who is rejected by the French Elise. References to harmony (a French feature) and melody (emphasized by advocates of Italian music) abound in the opera. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc78/
Les deux journées
Vocal score of Luigi Cherubini's rescue opera "Les deux journées" (also known by the title, The water carrier) to a libretto by Jean-Nicolas Bouilly. The first performance took place in Paris at Théâtre Feydeau on January 16, 1800 followed by 56 performance during that year. Les deux journées remained in the international repertory of operas for most of the 19th century. The piano reduction contains the text in French and German. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39254/
Exultate Deo: petit motet nouveau a voix seule et grande simphonie: chanté pour la premiere fois par Melle, Jet au Concert Spirituel le 4 Avril, 1755; Ch. d'Herbain
Sacred solo cantata for high voice, with orchestra. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc848766/
Matrimonio segreto : dramma giocoso in due atti = ou, Le mariage secret : opera comiLe mariage secret : opera comique en deux actesque en deux actes
Domenico Cimarosa’s Il matrimonio segreto premiered at the Burgtheater in Vienna on 7 February 1792, just two months after Mozart’s death. It received immediate accolades, particularly from Emperor Leopold II, and the opera was performed a second time that day for a private audience that included the Holy Roman ruler. Il matrimonio segreto enjoyed a successful run that lasted almost a hundred years, with revised versions appearing in the second half of the nineteenth century; in 1933, the work was performed at the Library of Congress. Although the harmonic language is largely diatonic, Cimarosa’s beautiful melodies and exciting rhythms complement Bertati’s direct text. The opera presents the predicament of the secretly married couple without resorting to stock plot conventions such as characters in disguise, conveying the dramatic naturalness and simplicity promoted by Rousseau. The inventive orchestration, which includes clarinets, was another aspect of the opera that was praised by some (while Schumann appreciated the orchestration, Berlioz was unimpressed). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82/
Rosamond
This three-act opera is to a libretto by Joseph Addison. Content is printed only on the recto side of each leaf. The score features two title pages: the first, with an engraving and small print describing the contents; the second, with large font. The work opens with a three-part "symphony or overture" for an ensemble of unspecified instrumentation: two treble instruments and one bass instrument. The indication "with Violins" on some the songs suggests the nature of the high instruments. No figures are included on the bass line. All the songs are followed, on the same page, by a version of the vocal line for flute. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463620/
Songs in the new opera call'd Arsinoe, queen of Cyprus
Thomas Clayton’s first opera, Arsinoe, Queen of Cyprus, premiered at Drury Lane in London on 16 January 1705. The opera initially enjoyed success, but two years later, Clayton’s second opera was not well-received. Part of Arsinoe’s popularity may have been due to Catherine Tofts' portrayal of the title character; Toft would later become a star of the English stage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3/
Cantates françoises à I. et II. voix: avec simphonie, et sans simphonie, V. 1-2
This item contains volumes 1 and 2 of Clérambault's "Cantates Françoises." The second volume bears the subtitle "Mellées de Simphonies." Volume 1 contains the cantatas "L'amour piqué," "Le jaloux," "Orphée," "Poliphême," "Medée," and "L'amour et Baccus." Volume 2 contains "Alphée et Arethuse," "Leandre et Hero," "La musette," "Pirame et Tisbé," "Pigmalion," and "Le triomphe de la paix." The continuo line is figured. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463638/
Devil to pay: or, The wives metamorphos'd
English libretto to Charles Coffey's ballad opera The devil to pay or, The wives metamorphos'd. The Devil to Pay is an adaptation of Thomas Jevon’s play The Devil of a Wife (1686). Nearly fifty years later, the ballad opera appeared at Drury Lane with Charles Coffey and John Mottley each responsible for half of the three acts. However, a much shorter and more well-received one-act version, edited by Theophilus Cibber, is represented in the printed libretto. Today Coffey is generally the only name widely attached to The Devil to Pay. The opera’s popularity is attested by the frequent performances and a translation into German, which contributed to the development of the Singspiel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2/
Thetis et Pelée; tragédie en musique
Pascal Collasse was one of the few opera composers able to secure successful performances in the years following Lully’s death. Collasse then went on to supply the music for the entire opera, Thétis et Pélée, which was premiered at the Paris Opéra on 11 January 1689. Thétis remained popular throughout Collasse’s lifetime, in spite of its rather weak plot. Owing to its success is primarily the music, including a significant storm scene in Act II. This departure from the Lullian tradition is perhaps Collasse’s most significant contribution to the tradition of French opera. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4/
Achille et Polixene, tragédie dont le prologue & les quatre derniers actes
Achille et Polixene, Jean-Baptiste Lully's last opera, premiered on 7 November 1687, eight months after Lully's death on March 22 of that year. Since the composer had only finished the overture and first act, the score was completed by Pascal Colasse, Lully's secretary and student, to a text by Jean Galbert de Campistron based on events in Virgil's Aeneid. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc50/
XII solos for a violin
This English edition of Corelli's Op. 5 sonata for violin and continuo is, aside from an engraving of the composer and the title page, printed on both the recto and verso sides of the leaves. The bass line contains figures. A note by the publisher states: "These Solos are Printed from a curious Edition Publish'd at Rome by the Author." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463626/
1er quatuor, pour deux violons, alto et basse, oeuvre 5
Musical score containing the four parts of Charles Dancla's first string quartet, op.5 in F minor, written for two violins, with alto and bass. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39285/
7e. quatuor, pour deux violons, alto et violoncelle, oeuv.80
This is a digital copy of the four parts of Charles Dancla's seventh string quartet, op.80 in D minor. Charles Dancla was the most prominent member of a family of musicians and a virtuoso violinist, composer and teacher. In 1828, he was admitted to the Paris Conservatory of Music, where he won the first prize in 1833. At the Conservatory, he studied violin with Paul Guérin and Pierre Baillot. Dancla played solo violin with the orchestra of the théâtre Royal de l'Opera Comique and with the Société des Concerts. In ca. 1860, he was appointed professor of violin at the Paris Conservatory and retired from that post in 1892. He wrote 14 string quartets intended for professional or amateur players (opp. 5, 7 ,18, 41, 48, 56, 80, 87, 101, 113, 125, 142, 160, and 195a) and three easy string quartets (op. 208). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39286/
Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune
This is the orchestral score of Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune. The copy was presented to Edouard Colonne with the inscription by the composer on the title page, "à Monsieur E. Colonne en hommage d'infinie gratitude artistique, Claude Debussy, Oct. 1895." The score contains performance markings in pen, pencil and crayon; possibly by Colonne. In original green wrapper. Preserved in green cloth-and-marbled-paper chemise with matching slipcase. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11081/
Les Elemens
This four-act ballet was premiered on 22 December 1721 at the Tullieries and, later, performed at L'Academie Royale de Musique on 29 May 1725 and 27 May 1734, and at the Theatre on 22 May 1742. Various dramatis personae present an allegorical depiction of the French court. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463634/
Omphale, tragedie en musique
Omphale (1701) is one of Destouches’s contributions to the Lullian genre of the five-act tragédie en musique. Half a century after the premiere, Friedrich Melchior Grimm targeted the opera in his pamphlet “Lettre sur Omphale” (1752), which continued the earlier debate between advocates of Lully and Rameau. This written attack also precipitated the famous guerre des bouffons, which was sparked by a performance of Pergolesi’s La serva padrona (1733) in 1752. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6/
Issé
1724 score of André Cardinal Destouches' opera Issé. Destouches’s Issé premiered in 1697, just nine years after the death of Jean-Baptiste Lully. The tradition of featuring new operas at the court prior to a public premiere—common during Lully’s later years—was reinstated with this work. When Destouches revived the opera in 1708, he enlarged the original three-act work to five acts. This allowed for expanded divertissements, choruses, and more elaborate arias, which appealed to contemporary public preferences. The volume in the Virtual Rare Book Room is the five-act version. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5/
Les deux chasseurs et la laitière; comédie en un acte
Duni’s French style was shaped by the developments of the War of the Buffoons, which pitted French tragic opera against Italian comic opera. The newly emergent opéra comique genre, for which Duni is still considered to be one of the major contributors, combined elements of both styles. His significance in the development of opéra comique is evident in the long-term success of Les deux chasseurs et la laitière, which was performed at the Comédie-Italien until 1792, almost twenty years after the composer’s death. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc7/
Les deux chasseurs et la laitière; comédie en un acte
Undated score of Egidio Duni's opera Les deux chaussures et la laitière. Duni’s French style was shaped by the developments of the War of the Buffoons, which pitted French tragic opera against Italian comic opera. The newly emergent opéra comique genre, for which Duni is still considered to be one of the major contributors, combined elements of both styles. His significance in the development of opéra comique is evident in the long-term success of Les deux chasseurs et la laitière, which was performed at the Comédie-Italien until 1792, almost twenty years after the composer’s death. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc8/
Forza del sangue, e della pietà; drama per musica
1686 libretto for Giuseppe Fabrini's opera La forza del sangue, e della pietà. The music for all of Giuseppe Fabrini’s operas, including La forza del sangue e della pietà, is lost. However, the libretti by Gerolamo Gigli, have been preserved for these dramas that were performed at the Collegio Tolomei in Siena. La forza del sangue e della pietà translates as “The Force of Blood and Pity.” digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9/
Amour au village : opera-comique, en un acte, et en vaudeviles
Libretto for Charles-Simon Favart's 1754 opera L'amour au village. Charles-Simon Favart gained prominence for his parodies of extant operas during the middle of the eighteenth century. His L’amour au village (1754), a typical example of the genre, was based on Carolet’s L’amour paysan (1737). The parody technique consisted of setting new texts to existing melodies and writing new dialogue based on a familiar plot. L’amour au village includes a typical vaudeville finale. In the Virtual Rare Book Room’s volume, the melody is included along with the first verse’s text. Because vaudeville finales are strophic (with one repeated melody), the subsequent verses are numbered to indicate each time the melody should begin again. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc10/
Achilles. An opera.
John Gay is credited with inventing the ballad opera, a genre that blends spoken plays and previously composed songs to new texts. Although The Beggar’s Opera (1728) was his most successful endeavor, he continued to compose English musical dramas. Achilles was finally performed in 1733, one year after Gay died. In this story, Achilles appears as a girl named Pyrrha, unknown to most of the inhabitants of the island of Scyros, in order to circumvent a prediction that he will die in battle. Deidamia (the king’s daughter) knows the secret, however, because she is carrying the disguised man’s child. After Achilles’s identity is revealed, he and Deidamia are able to wed. Then, in a fateful twist of irony, Achilles plans to join the Greeks in the Trojan War. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11/
The encore concerto for piano and orchestra
This is a holograph score of Don Gillis "The Encore Concerto for Piano and Orchestra." Gillis's dedicated this his first piano concerto to his friend Joseph Kahn. The entire score is in loose white onionskin pages and black ink. It is part of the UNT Music Library's Don Gillis Special Collection, which can be accessed at <http://www.library.unt.edu/music/special-collections/gillis/the-don-gillis-collection-1>. Page 96A is an alternative re-orchestrated version that replaces the essentially chordal accompaniment presented in p.96. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25947/
Armide: Drame héroique, mis en musique
Armide was premiered at the Paris Opéra on September 23, 1777, recalling the earlier success of Lully’s opera of the same name, which premiered nearly a century earlier on February 15, 1686. After collaborating on several reform operas with Calzabigi, Gluck revived the older dramatic tradition of Quinault (Lully's librettist) by setting the older text in the modern musical style. The seventeenth-century five act model requires more continuous music, with few distinct arias, as well as divertissements and spectacular effects. Gluck also respects the tragic conclusion endemic to the model, avoiding the modern practice of the lieto fine ("happy ending") in which misfortunes are reversed at the last possible moment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56/
Armide: Drame héroique, mis en musique
Armide was premiered at the Paris Opéra on September 23, 1777, recalling the earlier success of Lully’s opera of the same name, which premiered nearly a century earlier on February 15, 1686. After collaborating on several reform operas with Calzabigi, Gluck revived the older dramatic tradition of Quinault (Lully's librettist) by setting the older text in the modern musical style. The seventeenth-century five act model requires more continuous music, with few distinct arias, as well as divertissements and spectacular effects. Gluck also respects the tragic conclusion endemic to the model, avoiding the modern practice of the lieto fine ("happy ending") in which misfortunes are reversed at the last possible moment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc45/
Iphigenie en Aulide; tragédie. Opera en trois actes
Although he did not have a production planned, Gluck composed the music for Iphigénie en Aulide for Paris, with the intention (along with Roullet) of establishing himself at the Opéra. He initially had difficulties convincing the Academy of Music to arrange for the production, but with the support of Marie Antoinette, the opera was finally realized in 1773. Gluck revised Iphigénie for performances in 1775. The most significant change was the addition of Diana as a character, whose appearance serves as the deus ex machina of the plot. He also altered and expanded the divertissements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc15/
Iphigenie en Aulide; tragédie. Opera en trois actes
Although he did not have a production planned, Gluck composed the music for Iphigénie en Aulide for Paris, with the intention (along with Roullet) of establishing himself at the Opéra. He initially had difficulties convincing the Academy of Music to arrange for the production, but with the support of Marie Antoinette, the opera was finally realized in 1773. Gluck revised Iphigénie for performances in 1775. The most significant change was the addition of Diana as a character, whose appearance serves as the deus ex machina of the plot. He also altered and expanded the divertissements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc14/
Orphée et Euridice; tragédie; opéra en trois actes
The Viennese premiere of Orfeo was extremely well received, and Gluck decided to revise the opera as Orphée et Eurydice for Paris in 1774, with the French adaptation and additions provided by Pierre Louis Moline. The role of Orpheus was lowered slightly for an haute-contre singer (a male operatic voice type more in line with an alto range), adhering to French preferences. The opera was lengthened, to create a more magnificent spectacle, with extra arias, ensembles, and instrumental numbers. Gluck also modified the orchestration to accommodate the orchestra at the Académie Royale de Musique. This version, Orphée et Eurydice, became one of the most popular operas in France. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc16/
Armide: drame héroïque
Armide was premiered at the Paris Opéra on September 23, 1777, recalling the earlier success of Lully’s opera of the same name, which premiered nearly a century earlier on February 15, 1686. After collaborating on several reform operas with Calzabigi, Gluck revived the older dramatic tradition of Quinault (Lully's librettist) by setting the older text in the modern musical style. The seventeenth-century five act model requires more continuous music, with few distinct arias, as well as divertissements and spectacular effects. Gluck also respects the tragic conclusion endemic to the model, avoiding the modern practice of the lieto fine ("happy ending") in which misfortunes are reversed at the last possible moment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67/
Echo et Narcisse, drame lyrique en trois actes
After the resounding success of Iphigénie en Tauride (1779), Gluck set out to compose his last of the seven Paris operas, which turned out to be his final opera. Whereas Iphigénie en Tauride is often considered Gluck’s best opera, its immediate successor, Echo et Narcisse (1779) was ill-fated and quickly disappeared from the repertoire. Echo was premiered a mere four months after Tauride, and the Parisian audience was not prepared for the differences between these two operas. Although the music resembles that of his other French operas, the pastoral story lacks the dramatic intensity that viewers expected in a Gluck opera. Thus, the serene music—though it is at times quite beautiful— lacks dramatic impulse. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13/
Alceste: tragedie opera en trois actes
According to Grove Music, "when Admetus, King of Pherae in Thessaly, is ill and about to die an oracle announces that he will be saved if someone else is willing to die in his stead. His wife Alcestis displays her conjugal devotion by offering herself; she dies and Admetus recovers. Under the influence of tragédie lyrique, Calzabigi enriched his libretto with choruses, ballets and opportunities for impressive scenery." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc34/
Le Huron : comedie en deux actes, et en vers
Grétry’s Le Huron takes as its source a short story called L’ingénu (Geneva, 1767), written by Voltaire under the name Dulaurens. The story was banned two months after its publication due to anti-government themes. For instance, the young man raised by the Hurons (the title character of the opera) was imprisoned for expressing his radical ideas about issues such as the treatment of the Huguenots. Voltaire’s character is derived from another source, the novel Bélisaire by Marmontel, in which a man is framed for a crime and awaiting the death penalty before being released. Marmontel, who corresponded regularly with Voltaire, created the libretto for Grétry’s opera. However, most controversial aspects of the story were eliminated or downplayed for the censors, and as a result, the anti-religious message is absent from Le Huron. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc20/
Richard Cœur de Lion : opéra comique en trois actes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc22/
Épreuve villageoise : opéra bouffon en deux actes en vers
L’épreuve villageoise started out as Théodore et Paulin before Grétry convinced Desforges to rewrite the libretto. The original three-act opera was reduced to two acts, and the improbabilities of the original plot were reworked. Théodore et Paulin received one performance at Versailles on 5 March 1784, but it was never published. L’épreuve villageoise appeared at the Comédie-Italienne on 24 June 1784. This revision remained one of the most popular of Grétry’s opéra-comiques, receiving performances throughout the nineteenth century. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc19/
Colinette à la cour ou La double épreuve : comédie lyrique en trois actes
A comparison of the scores for Colinette à la cour and Barbe-bleue illustrates the primary distinguishing factor between the genres of comédie lyrique and opera comique: the method of dialogue delivery. In Paris, the issue of genre was tied to the performance venue of a particular opera, due to government regulations. Although comic opera was traditionally presented with spoken dialogue, as in opera comique, when Grétry composed for the Opéra, where recitative was expected, he merged comic subject matter with the sung dialogue heard in serious opera. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc18/
Panurge dans l'Isle des Lanternes : comédie lirique en trois actes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc21/
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