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Les deux comtesses : opera bouffon imité de l'Italien et parodié sous la musique

Les deux comtesses : opera bouffon imité de l'Italien et parodié sous la musique

Date: 178-?
Creator: Paisiello, Giovanni, 1740-1816
Description: Paisiello’s comic operas were some of the most successful of the time. In point of fact, his operas enjoyed 251 performances in Vienna between 1783 and 1792, compared to 63 performances of Mozart’s operas. The intermezzo Le due comtesse, which first appeared in Rome (with an all-male cast) on 3 January 1776, was translated to French and parodied by Nicolas Etienne Framery, who also adapted Paisiello’s Il barbiere di Siviglia for the Parisian stage.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Phaëton : tragédie mise en musique

Phaëton : tragédie mise en musique

Date: 1683
Creator: Lully, Jean Baptiste, 1632-1687
Description: Like many of the operas created by composer Jean-Baptiste Lully and Philippe Quinault, his favorite librettist, Phaëton is filled with solar symbolism--a reference to the "Sun King," Louis XIV. The story also provides a political lesson: the haughty youth unable to contend with his position of power served as a warning to anyone brash enough to challenge the rigid mores of Louis' court. In addition to this political interpretation, the story is also a character study of a reckless juvenile whose arrogance destroys him. Phaëton's misguided and inappropriate attempts to make his lineage public bring about his downfall. The plot, like that of several of Lully's operas, is based on an episode in Ovid's Metamorphoses.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Proserpine : tragedie mise en musique

Proserpine : tragedie mise en musique

Date: 1707
Creator: Lully, Jean Baptiste, 1632-1687
Description: With Proserpine, composer Jean-Baptiste Lully returned to his collaboration with librettist Philippe Quinault, which had been interrupted when the poet was banned from Court for offending Madame de Montespan (the king's mistress) with unflattering references in Isis. By 1679, Quinault had been restored to favor. Proserpine was first performed at St. Germain-en-Laye in February of 1680. Though seventeenth-century audiences were familiar with the story of Proserpine being carried off into Hades from numerous ballets and stage plays, Quinault returned to the source in Ovid's Metamorphoses to embellish the plot. In addition to details drawn from Ovid, Quinault added some of his own, making Proserpine among the most convoluted of Lully's operas. While the prologue alludes to King Louis XIV in the guise of Jupiter, the play itself refers specifically to the king's recent victories over the Spanish and Dutch when Jupiter battles and defeats the giants. Robert Isherwood notes that Jupiter's trip to Phrygia may represent Louis' inspection of Flanders after its defeat in 1679.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Thesee : tragédie

Thesee : tragédie

Date: 1675~
Creator: Lully, Jean Baptiste, 1632-1687 & Quinault, Philippe, 1635-1688
Description: Thesée, which premiered at the court theater at St. Germain-en-laye on January 11, 1675, was Jean-Baptiste Lully's third tragédie lyrique created in collaboration with librettist Philippe Quinault. As in most of his libretti for Lully, Quinault combines a plot based on a classical source (an episode from Ovid's Metamorphoses) with references to contemporary events. The Prologue alludes to Louis XIV's personal leadership in the military engagements in the Alsace (along the French/German border). The juxtaposition of Venus' entreaties for pleasure with Mars' call to arms reflects a period of unease during which the French armies were in retreat from the armies of the Elector of Brandenburg. This resulted in the unique joining of songs of love with songs of war and victory.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Zéphire et Flore; opéra en musique

Zéphire et Flore; opéra en musique

Date: 1688
Creator: Lully, Louis de, 1664-1734
Description: Zephire et Flore, the only opera attributed to Louis and Jean-Louis Lully, sons of Jean-Baptiste Lully, sets a libretto by Michel Du Boullay based on episodes from Greek mythology. It was performed for the first time 22 March 1688 at the Palais Royale in Paris. There is no record of a court performance, and it was revived only once, in June of 1715, with revisions by Destouches. We know of no modern performances, nor recordings of the opera in whole or in part.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Hand-Written Program Lists, 1978-1981

Hand-Written Program Lists, 1978-1981

Date: 1978 - 1981
Creator: Conover, Willis
Description: Handwritten program lists for Music USA, 1978-1981.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Hand-Written Program Lists, 1981-1982

Hand-Written Program Lists, 1981-1982

Date: unknown
Creator: Conover, Willis
Description: Handwritten cue sheets for Music USA, 1981-1982. Includes: Individual Program Lists, February and March 1978; Handwritten Program Lists, December 1981; Handwritten Program Lists, January-March 1982; Interview with Lee Bark; Notes for Art Farmer program; UDC Lab Jazz Band; Toni Wilson notes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Hand-Written Program Lists, 1982-1983

Hand-Written Program Lists, 1982-1983

Date: unknown
Creator: Conover, Willis
Description: Handwritten cue sheets for Music USA, 1982-1983. Includes: Handwritten Program Lists, September-December 1982; Handwritten Program Lists, January-February 1983.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Handwritten Program Lists, March-July 1982

Handwritten Program Lists, March-July 1982

Date: 1982
Creator: Conover, Willis
Description: Handwritten cue sheets for Music USA, March-July 1982.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Plain and easy introduction to practical music

Plain and easy introduction to practical music

Date: 1771
Creator: Morley, Thomas, 1557-1603?
Description: In 1597, while Morley was negotiating for the patent, he wrote his musical treatise, A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke. Although his preface contains the statement that he had “nothing better to do,” Morley probably knew publishing a treatise on the science of music would boost public interest in purchasing musical works. In addition, by publishing such a work, the English audience would view Morley as an authority in music (and he would become more likely to obtain the patent) (Smith, “Print Culture and the Elizabethan Composer,” 163). The work is practical, and is organized into three sections: teaching to sing simple song, teaching to sing two parts over a plainsong or ground, and teaching counterpoint.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library