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3-D Seismic Exploration Project, Ute Indian Tribe, Uintah and Ouray Reservation, Uintah County, Utah

3-D Seismic Exploration Project, Ute Indian Tribe, Uintah and Ouray Reservation, Uintah County, Utah

Date: September 9, 2002
Creator: Eckels, Marc T.
Description: The objectives of this North Hill Creek 3-D seismic survey were to: (1) cover as large an area as possible with available budget; (2) obtain high quality data throughout the depth range of the prospective geologic formations of 2,000' to 12,000' to image both gross structures and more subtle structural and stratigraphic elements; (3) overcome the challenges posed by a hard, reflective sandstone that cropped out or was buried just a few feet below the surface under most of the survey area; and (4) run a safe survey.
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3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary

3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary

Date: July 14, 2003
Creator: Majer, E.L.
Description: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the challenge has been to separate the ''background'' natural complexity and heterogeneity of the matrix from the fracture/fault heterogeneity controlling the fluid flow. Ideally one not only wants to find the fractures, but the fractures that are controlling the flow of the fluids. Evaluated in this work is current state-of-the-art surface (seismic reflection) and borehole seismic methods (Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell and Single Well) to locate and quantify geothermal reservoir characteristics. The focus is on active methods; the assumption being that accuracy is needed for successful well siting. Passive methods are useful for exploration and detailed monitoring for in-fill ...
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3-D Silicon Photonic Lattices- Cornerstone of an Emerging Photonics Revolution

3-D Silicon Photonic Lattices- Cornerstone of an Emerging Photonics Revolution

Date: July 8, 1999
Creator: Fleming, J.G. & Lin, Shawn-Yu
Description: Three-dimensional photonic lattices are engineered materials which are the photonic analogues of semiconductors. These structures were first proposed and demonstrated in the mid-to-late 1980's. However, due to fabrication difficulties, lattices active in the infrared are only just emerging. Wide ranges of structures and fabrication approaches have been investigated. The most promising approach for many potential applications is a diamond-like structure fabricated using silicon microprocessing techniques. This approach has enabled the fabrication of 3-D silicon photonic lattices active in the infrared. The structures display band gaps centered from 12{micro} down to 1.55{micro}.
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3-D SIMULATION FOR ASSESSMENT OF TRANSPARENT WEAPON DISASSEMBLY OPERATIONS

3-D SIMULATION FOR ASSESSMENT OF TRANSPARENT WEAPON DISASSEMBLY OPERATIONS

Date: September 1, 2000
Creator: JACKSON, J. W.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D Spectral Induced Polarization (IP) Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization Of Contaminant Plumes

3-D Spectral Induced Polarization (IP) Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization Of Contaminant Plumes

Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Morgan, Dale F.; Lesmes, David P.; Rodi, William; Shi, Weiqun; Frye, Kevin, M. & Sturrock, John
Description: The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth's subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are 1. 2. 3. Understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations. Developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field. Developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization DE FG02 96ER 14714

3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization DE FG02 96ER 14714

Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: Morgan, F. Dale; Rodi, William & Lesmes, David
Description: The Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL) performed a broad foundational study of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for site characterization. The project encompassed laboratory studies of microgeometry and chemistry effects on Induced Polarization (IP), an investigation of electromagnetic coupling (emc) noise, and development of 3D modeling and inversion codes. The major finding of the project is that emc noise presents a critical limitation for field implementation of SIP and conventional correction methods are inadequate. The project developed a frequency domain 3D complex resistivity modeling and inversion code Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effects of solution chemistry and microgeometry on the SIP response of sandstone. Results indicate that changes in chemistry affect the magnitude of the spectral IP response and changes in microgeometry affect the shape of the spectral IP response. The developed physiochemical IP model can be used to invert spectral IP data for an apparent grain size distribution. Laboratory studies over the last twenty years have shown that SIP data must be acquired over several decades of frequency and include frequencies greater than 1kHz. A model of the components of emc noise has been developed and investigation with this model showed that inductive coupling is the most significant component. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization of Contaminant Plumes

3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization of Contaminant Plumes

Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Morgan, F. Dale; Rodi, William & Lesmes, David
Description: The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth's subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are: (1) Understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations. (2) Developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field. (3) Developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. 1998 annual progress report

3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. 1998 annual progress report

Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W. & Lesmes, D.
Description: 'The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are: (1) understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations; (2) developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field; (3) developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties. The authors laboratory experiments to date are described in Appendices A and B, which consist of two papers submitted to the annual SAGEEP conference (Frye et al., 1998; Sturrock et al., 1998). The experiments involved measurements of complex resistivity vs. frequency on a suite of brine saturated sandstone samples. In one set of experiments, the fluid chemistry (pH, ionic strength, and cation type) was varied. In a second set of experiments, the microgeometry of the rock matrix was varied. The experiments showed that spectral IP responses ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Frye, K.M.; Lesmes, D.P.; Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W.; Shi, W. & Sturrock, J.
Description: 'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. The first-year accomplishments are (1) laboratory experiments on fluid-saturated sandstones quantifying the dependence of spectral IP responses on solution chemistry and rock micro-geometry; (2) library research on the current understanding of electromagnetic coupling effects on IP data acquired in the field: and (3) development of prototype forward modeling and inversion algorithms for interpreting IP data in terms of 3-D models of complex resistivity.'
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D surface profile measurements of large x-ray synchrotron radiation mirrors using stitching interferometry.

3-D surface profile measurements of large x-ray synchrotron radiation mirrors using stitching interferometry.

Date: September 12, 2002
Creator: Assoufid, L.; Bray, M.; Qian, J. & Shu, D.
Description: Stitching interferometry, using small-aperture, high-resolution, phase-measuring interferometry, has been proposed for quite some time now as a metrology technique to obtain 3-dimensional profiles of surfaces of oversized optical components and substrates. The aim of this work is to apply this method to the specific case of long grazing-incidence x-ray mirrors, such as those used in beamlines at synchrotron radiation facilities around the world. Both fabrication and characterization of these mirrors would greatly benefit from this technique because it offers the potential for providing measurements with accuracy and resolution better than those obtained using existing noncontact laser profilers, such as the long trace profiler (LTP). Measurement data can be used as feedback for computer-controlled fabrication processes to correct for possible topography errors. The data can also be used for simulating and predicting mirror performance under realistic conditions. A semiautomated stitching system was built and tested at the X-ray Optics Metrology Laboratory of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial objective was to achieve a measurement sensitivity on the order of 1 {micro}rad rms. Preliminary tests on a 1 m-long x-ray mirror showed system repeatability of less than 0.6 {micro}rad rms. This value is comparable to that of a ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department