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9/11 Terrorism: Global Economic Costs

9/11 Terrorism: Global Economic Costs

Date: October 5, 2004
Creator: Nanto, Dick K.
Description: The 9/11 attacks were part of Al Qaeda’s strategy to disrupt Western economies and impose both direct and secondary costs on the United States and other nations. The immediate costs were the physical damage, loss of lives and earnings, slower world economic growth, and capital losses on stock markets. Indirect costs include higher insurance and shipping fees, diversion of time and resources away from enhancing productivity to protecting and insuring property, public loss of confidence, and reduced demand for travel and tourism. In a broader sense, the 9/11 attacks led to the invasions and occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq (and the Global War on Terrorism) and perhaps emboldened terrorists to attack in Bali, Spain, Morocco, and Saudi Arabia. A policy question for Congress is how to evaluate the costs and benefits of further spending to counter terrorism and its economic impact.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
9. international mouse genome conference

9. international mouse genome conference

Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: unknown
Description: This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The 10,000-year debate

The 10,000-year debate

Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Wilson, J.R.
Description: Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has developed into a respected tool within the reactor community. Now, this PRA technique is being applied to a new arena, the distant future of the nuclear waste repository. Problems are already testing the credibility of PRA.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a muon-muon collider

A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a muon-muon collider

Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Cho, Y.; Chae, Y.-C. & Crosbie, E.
Description: The performance parameters of a proton source which produces the required flux of muons for a 2-TeV on 2-TeV muon collider are: a beam energy of 10 GeV, a repetition rate of 30 Hz, two bunches per pulse with 5 x 10{sup 13} protons per bunch, and an rms bunch length of 3 nsec (1). Aside from the bunch length requirement, these parameters are identical to those of a 5-MW proton source for a spallation neutron source based on a 10-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) (2). The 10-GeV synchrotron uses a 2-GeV accelerator system as its injector, and the 2-GeV RCS is an extension of a feasibility study for a I-MW spallation source described elsewhere (3--9). A study for the 5-MW spallation source was performed for ANL site-specific geometrical requirements. Details are presented for a site-independent proton source suitable for the muon collider utilizing the results of the 5-MW spallation source study.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a pulsed spallation source

A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a pulsed spallation source

Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Cho, Y.; Chae, Y.C. & Crosbie, E.
Description: A feasibility study for a pulsed spallation source based on a 5-MW, 10-GeV rapid proton synchrotron (RCS) is in progress. The integrated concept and performance parameters of the facility are discussed. The 10-GeV synchrotron uses as its injector the 2-GeV accelerator system of a 1-MW source described elsewhere. The 1-MW source accelerator system consists of a 400-MeV H{sup {minus}} linac with 2.5 MeV energy spread in the 75% chopped (25% removed) beam and a 30-Hz RCS that accelerates the 400-MeV beam to 2 GeV. The time averaged current of the accelerator system is 0.5 mA, equivalent to 1.04 {times} 10{sup 14} protons per pulse. The 10-GeV RCS accepts the 2 GeV beam and accelerates it to 10 GeV. Beam transfer from the 2-GeV synchrotron to the 10-GeV machine u highly efficient bunch-to-bucket injection, so that the transfer can be made without beam loss. The synchrotron lattice uses FODO cells of 90{degrees} phase advance. Dispersion-free straight sections are obtained using a missing magnet scheme. The synchrotron magnets are powered by dual-frequency resonant circuits. The magnets are excited at a 20-Hz rate and de-excited at 60-Hz. resulting in an effective 30-Hz rate. A key feature of the design of this accelerator system ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
10 microsecond time resolution studies of Cygnus X-1

10 microsecond time resolution studies of Cygnus X-1

Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Wen, H.C.
Description: Time variability analyses have been applied to data composed of event times of X-rays emitted from the binary system Cygnus X-1 to search for unique black hole signatures. The X-ray data analyzed was collected at ten microsecond time resolution or better from two instruments, the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory (HEAO) A-1 detector and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA). HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA collected data from 1977--79 and from 1996 on with energy sensitivity from 1--25 keV and 2--60 keV, respectively. Variability characteristics predicted by various models of an accretion disk around a black hole have been searched for in the data. Drop-offs or quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the Fourier power spectra are expected from some of these models. The Fourier spectral technique was applied to the HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA data with careful consideration given for correcting the Poisson noise floor for instrumental effects. Evidence for a drop-off may be interpreted from the faster fall off in variability at frequencies greater than the observed breaks. Both breaks occur within the range of Keplerian frequencies associated with the inner edge radii of advection-dominated accretion disks predicted for Cyg X-1. The break between 10--20 Hz is also ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
10-MW demonstration of the gas suspension absorption process at TVA`s Center for Emissions Research. Final report

10-MW demonstration of the gas suspension absorption process at TVA`s Center for Emissions Research. Final report

Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: unknown
Description: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in cooperation with AirPol Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed a successful 17-month test program with the AirPol Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process at TVA`s Center for Emissions Research (CER). This project was selected by DOE for funding in the third round of the Clean Coal Technology Program. This 10-MW demonstration of the GSA FGD system at the CER was the first application of this technology in the U.S. The GSA test program, which was cofunded two-thirds by TVA and one-third by DOE/AirPol, was completed over a 17-month period from November 1, 1992 to March 31, 1993. This test program demonstrated that the GSA FGD technology could achieve high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (90+ percent) for a 2.7 percent sulfur (as-fired) coal application, while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), i.e., 0.03 lb/MBtu, in a four-field electrostatic precipitator. The reliability and operability of this system was also demonstrated in a 28-day, 24 hour/day, continuous run during which the GSA unit simultaneously achieved high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (90+ percent) and maintained particulate emissions below the NSPS. Also, the air toxics removal capabilities ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
13. international conference on the application of accelerators in research and industry. Final performance technical report

13. international conference on the application of accelerators in research and industry. Final performance technical report

Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: unknown
Description: This report summarizes attendance at the conference, describes its session subjects and other activities, names its sponsoring organizations, and references where the papers published for it may be found (in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Vol. B 99 (1995)).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
13 point video tape quality guidelines

13 point video tape quality guidelines

Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Gaunt, R.
Description: Until high definition television (ATV) arrives, in the U.S. we must still contend with the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) video standard (or PAL or SECAM-depending on your country). NTSC, a 40-year old standard designed for transmission of color video camera images over a small bandwidth, is not well suited for the sharp, full-color images that todays computers are capable of producing. PAL and SECAM also suffers from many of NTSC`s problems, but to varying degrees. Video professionals, when working with computer graphic (CG) images, use two monitors: a computer monitor for producing CGs and an NTSC monitor to view how a CG will look on video. More often than not, the NTSC image will differ significantly from the CG image, and outputting it to NTSC as an artist works enables the him or her to see the images as others will see it. Below are thirteen guidelines designed to increase the quality of computer graphics recorded onto video tape. Viewing your work in NTSC and attempting to follow the below tips will enable you to create higher quality videos. No video is perfect, so don`t expect to abide by every guideline every time.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
15. international conference on plant growth substances: Program -- Abstracts

15. international conference on plant growth substances: Program -- Abstracts

Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: unknown
Description: Since the 14th Conference in Amsterdam in 1991, progress in plant hormone research and developmental plant biology has been truly astonishing. The five ``classical`` plant hormones, auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, ethylene, and abscisic acid, have been joined by a number of new signal molecules, e.g., systemin, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, whose biosynthesis and functions are being understood in ever greater detail. Molecular genetics has opened new vistas in an understanding of transduction pathways that regulate developmental processes in response to hormonal and environmental signals. The program of the 15th Conference includes accounts of this progress and brings together scientists whose work focuses on physiological, biochemical, and chemical aspects of plant growth regulation. This volume contains the abstracts of papers presented at this conference.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department