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Enzymology of the Pathway for Acetate Conversion to Methane in Methanosarcina thermophilia

Enzymology of the Pathway for Acetate Conversion to Methane in Methanosarcina thermophilia

Date: May 4, 1999
Creator: Ferry, James G.
Description: These topics are covered: Regulation of enzyme synthesis; Activation of acetate to acetyl-CoA; Biochemistry of acetyl-CoA cleavage; Electron transport; Other enzymes implicated in the pathway of acetate conversion to methane; and publications resulting from this work.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
EOCR Control Rod and Driver Fuel Hydraulic Tests

EOCR Control Rod and Driver Fuel Hydraulic Tests

Date: October 19, 1962
Creator: Harrison, L. J.
Description: Report discussing the results of experiments on an EOCR prototype control rod, control rod drive, and driver fuel assembly that were extensively tested in 500 deg F Santowax and 132 deg F water. These tests not only established the operating characteristics of these assemblies but also revealed a number of deficiencies in the various components. It includes descriptions of the control rod, control rod drive, and driver fuel assembly together with descriptions of their method of operation.
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EOS for critical slurry and solution systems

EOS for critical slurry and solution systems

Date: October 27, 1998
Creator: DiPeso, G & Peterson, P
Description: In a fire involving fissile material, the mixture of the fissile material ash with fire fighting water may lead to a criticality excursion if there are nearby sumps that permit a critical geometry. The severity of the resulting energy release and pressure pulse is dependent on the rate at which the mixing occurs. To calculate these excursions, a non-equilibrium equation of state for the water ash mixture or slurry is needed that accounts for the thermal non-equilibrium that occurs due to finite heat transfer rates. We are developing the slurry EOS as well as a lumped neutronic and hydrodynamic model to serve as a testing ground for the non-equilibrium EOS before its incorporation into more sophisticated neutronic-hydrodynamics codes. Though the model lacks spatial dependence, it provides estimates of energy release and pressure pulses for various mixture assembly rates. We are also developing a non-equilibrium EOS for critical solution systems in which the fissile material is dissolved in water, which accounts for chemical non-equilibrium due to finite mass transfer rates. In contrast to previously published solution EOS, our solution EOS specifically accounts for mass diffusion of dissolved radiolytic gas to bubble nucleation sites. This EOS was developed to check our overall ...
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EOS of a material mixture in pressure equilibrium

EOS of a material mixture in pressure equilibrium

Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: Cranfill, Charles W.
Description: A procedure is presented for calculating the equation of state (EOS) of a material mixture whose constituents are in pressure equilibrium but not necessarily in temperature equilibrium. A Newton-Raphson iteration is performed to determine the constituent partial volumes and energies that give equal partial pressures subject to the constraints that the total volume and energy of the mixture are specified. During each iteration, the changes in EOS quantities are chosen to be fixed (but arbitrary) linear combinations of their temperature-equilibrium and isentropic values, so those two extremes can be reproduced as special cases. The changes in the constituent partial volumes and energies are limited to prevent the Newton-Raphson iteration from diverging.
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EOS, thermodynamic, and structural-mechanical properties of intermetallic compounds

EOS, thermodynamic, and structural-mechanical properties of intermetallic compounds

Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Wills, J.M.; Straub, G. & Albers, R.C.
Description: This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Several classes of binary intermetallic compounds have important potential application as high temperature structural materials because of their high melting temperature, low density, and high strength, but their use is limited by their poor low temperature ductility and fracture toughness. The goal of this project was to further the development of techniques for performing ab-initio calculations of the electronic, structural, and elastic properties of these materials in an investigation of the relation between structure, composition, and mechanical properties of intermetallics. Materials properties to be addressed in these calculations included the equation of state (EOS), defect structure energetics, and elastic constants and phonons. Major accomplishments included calculations of stacking fault and twin energies in layered TiAl, structural stability in binary and ternary Ti-Al-Nb compounds, and point defect energies and elastic moduli of Laves phase intermetallics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
EOS7R: Radionuclide transport for TOUGH2

EOS7R: Radionuclide transport for TOUGH2

Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Oldenburg, C.M. & Pruess, K.
Description: EOS7R provides radionuclide transport capability for TOUGH2. EOS7R extends the EOS7 module (water, brine, and optional air) to model water, brine, parent component, daughter component, and optional air and heat. The radionuclide components follow a first-order decay law, and may adsorb onto the solid grains. Volatilization of the decaying components is modeled by Henry`s Law. The decaying components are normally referred to as radionuclides, but they may in fact by any trace components that decay, adsorb, and volatilize. The decay process need not be radioactive decay, but could be any process that follows a first-order decay law, such as biodegradation. EOS7R includes molecular diffusion for all components in gaseous and aqueous phases using a simplified binary diffusion model. When EOS7R is used with standard TOUGH2, transport occurs by advection and molecular diffusion in all phases. When EOS7R is coupled with the dispersion module T2DM, one obtains T2DMR, the radionuclide transport version of T2DM. T2DMR models advection, diffusion, and hydrodynamic dispersion in rectangular two-dimensional regions. Modeling of radionuclide transport requires input parameters specifying the half-life for first-order decay, distribution coefficients for each rock type for adsorption, and inverse Henry`s constants for volatilization. Options can be specified in the input file to ...
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EOS9nT: A TOUGH2 MODULE FOR THE SIMULATION OF FLOW AND SOLUTE/COLLOID TRANSPORT

EOS9nT: A TOUGH2 MODULE FOR THE SIMULATION OF FLOW AND SOLUTE/COLLOID TRANSPORT

Date: July 31, 1998
Creator: G.J. MORIDIS, Y.S. WU AND K.PRUESS
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
EOS9nT: A TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and solute/colloid transport

EOS9nT: A TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and solute/colloid transport

Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.S. & Pruess, K.
Description: EOS9nT is a new TOUGH2 module for the simulation of flow and transport of an arbitrary number n of tracers (solutes and/or colloids) in the subsurface. The module first solves the flow-related equations, which are comprised of (a) the Richards equation and, depending on conditions, may also include (b) the flow equation of a dense brine or aqueous suspension and/or (c) the heat equation. A second set of transport equations, corresponding to the n tracers, are then solved sequentially. The low concentrations of the n tracers are considered to have no effect on the liquid phase, thus making possible the decoupling of their equations. The first set of equations in EOS9nT provides the flow regime and account for fluid density variations due to thermal and/or solute concentration effects. The n tracer transport equations account for sorption, radioactive decay, advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, molecular diffusion, as well as filtration (for colloids only). EOS9nT can handle gridblocks or irregular geometry in three-dimensional domains. Preliminary results from four 1-D verification problems show an excellent agreement between the numerical predictions and the known analytical solutions.
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EOS9NT: A TOUGH2 module for the simulation of water flow and solute/colloid transport in the subsurface

EOS9NT: A TOUGH2 module for the simulation of water flow and solute/colloid transport in the subsurface

Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.S. & Pruess, K.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
EOSN - A new TOUGH2 module for simulating transport of noble gases in the subsurface

EOSN - A new TOUGH2 module for simulating transport of noble gases in the subsurface

Date: April 2, 2003
Creator: Shan, Chao & Pruess, Karsten
Description: Noble gases widely exist in nature, and except for radon, they are stable. Modern techniques can detect noble gases to relatively low concentrations and with great precision. These factors suggest that noble gases can be useful tracers for subsurface characterization. Their applications, however, require an appropriate transport model for data analyses. A new fluid property module, EOSN, was developed for TOUGH2 to simulate transport of noble gases in the subsurface. Currently any of five different noble gases (except radon) as well as CO{sub 2} can be selected, two at a time. For the two selected gas components, the Crovetto et al. (1982) model is used to calculate the Henry's law coefficients; and the Reid et al. (1987) correlation is used to calculate the gas phase diffusivities. Like most other sister modules, TOUGH2/EOSN can simulate nonisothermal multiphase flow and fully coupled transport in fractured porous media. Potential applications of the new module include, but are not limited to: (a) study of different reservoir processes such as recharge, boiling, condensation, and fracture-matrix fluid exchange; (b) characterization of reservoir geometry such as fracture spacing; and (c) analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department