You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In-situ radiation measurements of the C1 and C2 waste storage tank vault

In-situ radiation measurements of the C1 and C2 waste storage tank vault

Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Yong, L.K.; Womble, P.C. & Weems, L.D.
Description: In August of 1996, the Applied Radiation Measurements Department (ARMD) of the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked with characterizing the radiation fields in the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank vault located at ORNL. These in-situ measurements were made to provide data for evaluating the potential radiological conditions for personnel working in or around the vault during future planned activities. This report describes the locations where measurements were made, the types of radiation detection instruments used, the methods employed, the problems encountered and resolved, and discusses the results obtained.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In situ radiological surveying at the Double Tracks site, Nellis Air Force Range, Tonopah, Nevada

In situ radiological surveying at the Double Tracks site, Nellis Air Force Range, Tonopah, Nevada

Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Riedhauser, S.R. & Tipton, W.J.
Description: A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the Double Tracks site on the Nellis Air Force Range just east of Goldfield, Nevada, during the periods of April 10-13 and June 5-9, 1995. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This site includes the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The main purpose of the first expedition was to assess several new techniques for characterizing sites with dispersed plutonium. The two purposes of the second expedition were to characterize the distribution of transuranic contamination (primarily plutonium) at the site by measuring the gamma rays from americium-241 and to assess the performance of the two new detector platforms. Both of the new platforms performed well, and the characterization of the americium-241 activity at the site was completed. Several plots compare these ground-based system measurements and the 1993 aerial data. The agreement is good considering the systems are characterized and calibrated through independent means. During the April expedition, several methods for measuring the depth distribution of americium-241 in the field were conducted as a way of quickly ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In-situ real time monitoring of the polymerization in gel-cast ceramic processes

In-situ real time monitoring of the polymerization in gel-cast ceramic processes

Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Ahuja, S.; Dieckman, S.L.; Bostrom, G.A.; Waterfield, L.G.; Raptis, A.C. & Omatete, O.O.
Description: Gelcasting requires making a mixture of a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers and casting it in a mold. Gelcasting is different from injection molding in that it separates mold filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging were used for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and gelcasting of alumina. {sup 1}H NMR spectra and images are obtained during polymerization of a mixture of soluble reactive acrylamide monomers. Polymerization was initiated by adding an initiator and an accelerator to form long- chain, crosslinked polymers. Multidimensional NMR imaging was used for in-situ monitoring of the process and for verification of homogeneous polymerization. Comparison of the modeled intensities with acquired images shows a direction extraction of T{sub 1} data from the images.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In-situ, real-time, studies of film growth processes using ion scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy techniques.

In-situ, real-time, studies of film growth processes using ion scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy techniques.

Date: April 22, 1999
Creator: Smentkowski, V. S.
Description: Time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) enables the characterization of the composition and structure of surfaces with 1-2 monolayer specificity. It will be shown that surface analysis is possible at ambient pressures greater than 3 mTorr using TOF-ISARS techniques; allowing for real-time, in situ studies of film growth processes. TOF-ISARS comprises three analytical techniques: ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), which detects the backscattered primary ion beam; direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), which detects the surface species recoiled into the forward scattering direction; and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI), which is 3 variant of DRS capable of isotopic resolution for all surface species--including H and He. The advantages and limitations of each of these techniques will be discussed. The use of the three TOF-ISARS methods for real-time, in situ film growth studies at high ambient pressures will be illustrated. It will be shown that MSRI analysis is possible during sputter deposition. It will be also be demonstrated that the analyzer used for MSRI can also be used for time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) under high vacuum conditions. The use of a single analyzer to perform the complimentary surface analytical techniques of MSRI and SIMS is unique. The dwd ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area

In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area

Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E. & Cole, C.R.
Description: This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In situ redox manipulation treatability test -- waste management plan

In situ redox manipulation treatability test -- waste management plan

Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Knepp, A. J.
Description: This Waste Management Plan provides guidance for the management of waste generated from groundwater well installations in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The well installations are necessary to implement the In Situ Redox Manipulation Treatability Test to determine methods for in situ remedial efforts to prevent discharge of hexavalent chromium at levels above those considered protective of aquatic life in the Columbia River and riverbed sediments
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil benchtop experiment overview and results

In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil benchtop experiment overview and results

Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E. & Roybal, W.T.
Description: The authors have developed an in-situ process that combines RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove soil contaminants. They have conducted a number of benchtop experiments involving RF/microwave energy deposition and vapor extraction on controlled contaminated soil samples with successful removal of the DNAPL contaminants. This paper will describe the experiments performed and present results.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview

In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview

Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Regan, A.H.; Roybal, W.T.; Ortega, R.; Palomares, M.; Rees, D.E. & Tischler, D.
Description: Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors have developed an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants. The authors have conducted a number of benchtop experiments involving RF/microwave energy deposition and vapor extraction on controlled contaminated soil samples with successful removal of the contaminants. This paper will describe the experimental hardware utilized, the experiments performed, the chemical analysis performed pre- and post-energy application, and results. In the experiments, two different halogenated liquids were used to contaminate the soil: carbon tetrachloride and 1,1,1-trichloroethane.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview

In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview

Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T. & Ross, T.J.
Description: Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors are developing an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently, the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The authors objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Stewart, C.W.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Brewster, M.E.; Chen, G.; Reid, H.C.; Shepard, C.L. et al.
Description: This report is a detailed characterization of gas retention and release in 6 Hanford DS waste tanks. The results came from the ball rheometer and void fraction instrument in (flammable gas watch list) tanks SY-101, SY-103, AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 are presented. Instrument operation and derivation of data reduction methods are presented. Gas retention and release information is summarized for each tank and includes tank fill history and instrumentation, waste configuration, gas release, void fraction distribution, gas volumes, rheology, and photographs of the waste column from extruded core samples. Potential peak burn pressure is computed as a function of gas release fraction to portray the `hazard signature` of each tank. It is shown that two tanks remain well below the maximum allowable pressure, even if the entire gas content were released and ignited, and that none of the others present a hazard with their present gas release behavior.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department