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Design of recording wind tunnel balances

Design of recording wind tunnel balances

Date: December 1, 1920
Creator: Norton, F H
Description: Given here is a description of the design of a scientific recording wind tunnel balance. It was decided that the most satisfactory arrangement would be a rigid ring completely surrounding the tunnel or wind stream, so that the model could be supported from it by wires or any arrangement of spindles. The forces and moments acting on this ring can then be recorded by suitable weighing apparatus. The methods available for recording forces on the arms are explained. The proposed type of balance will support the model rigidly in a variety of ways, will make a complete test without attention, and will plot the results so that all computations are avoided.
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Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

Date: May 25, 2012
Creator: Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V. & /SLAC
Description: We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.
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Design of RF Systems for the RTD Mission VASIMR

Design of RF Systems for the RTD Mission VASIMR

Date: April 12, 1999
Creator: Baity, F. W.; Barber, G. C.; Carter, M. D.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Goulding, R. H.; McCaskill, G. E. et al.
Description: The first flight test of the variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (VASIMR) is tentatively scheduled for the Radiation and Technology Demonstration (RTD) in 2003. This mission to map the radiation environment out to several earth radii will employ both a Hall thruster and a VASIMR during its six months duration, beginning from low earth orbit. The mission will be powered by a solar array providing 12 kW of direct current electricity at 50 V. The VASIMR utilizes radiofrequency (RF) power both to generate a high-density plasma in a helicon source and to accelerate the plasma ions to high velocity by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). The VASIMR concept is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with national laboratories and universities. Prototype plasma sources, RF amplifiers, and antennas are being developed in the experimental facilities of the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL).
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The design of scalable software libraries for distributed memory concurrent computers

The design of scalable software libraries for distributed memory concurrent computers

Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Choi, J.; Walker, D.W. & Dongarra, J.J.
Description: This paper describes the design of ScaLAPACK, a scalable software library for performing dense and banded linear algebra computations on distributed memory concurrent computers. The specification of the data distribution has important consequences for interprocessor communication and load balance, and hence is a major factor in determining performance and scalability of the library routines. The block cyclic data distribution is adopted as a simple, yet general-purpose, way of decomposing block-partitioned matrices. Distributed memory versions of the Level 3 BLAS provide an easy and convenient way of implementing the ScaLAPACK routines.
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Design of second generation Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system

Design of second generation Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system

Date: April 2, 1998
Creator: Edgemon, G.L.
Description: The Hanford Site has 177 underground waste tanks that store approximately 253 million liters of radioactive waste from 50 years of plutonium production. Twenty-eight tanks have a double shell and are constructed of welded ASTM A537-Class 1 (UNS K02400), ASTM A515-Grade 60 (UNS K02401), or ASTM A516-Grade 60 (UNS K02100) material. The inner tanks of the double-shell tanks (DSTS) were stress relieved following fabrication. One hundred and forty-nine tanks have a single shell, also constructed of welded mild steel, but not stress relieved following fabrication. Tank waste is in liquid, solid, and sludge forms. Tanks also contain a vapor space above the solid and liquid waste regions. The composition of the waste varies from tank to tank but generally has a high pH (>12) and contains sodium nitrate, sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, and other minor radioactive constituents resulting from plutonium separation processes. Leaks began to appear in the single-shell tanks shortly after the introduction of nitrate-based wastes in the 1950s. Leaks are now confirmed or suspected to be present in a significant number of single-shell tanks. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported as nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting. Previous efforts to monitor internal corrosion of waste ...
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Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

Date: June 1, 2012
Creator: Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D. & Kurtz, S.
Description: State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.
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Design of simulation builder software to support the enterprise modeling and simulation task of the AMTEX program

Design of simulation builder software to support the enterprise modeling and simulation task of the AMTEX program

Date: December 12, 1995
Creator: Nolan, M.; Lamont, A. & Chang, L.
Description: This document describes the implementation of the Simulation Builder developed as part of the Enterprise Modeling and Simulation (EM&S) portion of the Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project. The Simulation Builder software allows users to develop simulation models using pre-defined modules from a library. The Simulation Builder provides the machinery to allow the modules to link together and communicate information during the simulation run. This report describes the basic capabilities and structure of the Simulation Builder to assist a user in reviewing and using the code. It also describes the basic steps to follow when developing modules to take advantage of the capabilities provided by the Simulation Builder. The Simulation Builder software is written in C++. The discussion in this report assumes a sound understanding of the C++ language. Although this report describes the steps to follow when using the Simulation Builder, it is not intended to be a tutorial for a user unfamiliar with C++.
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Design of single spoke resonantors for Project X

Design of single spoke resonantors for Project X

Date: March 1, 2011
Creator: Ristori, L.; Barbanotti, S.; Champion, M.; Foley, M.; Gonin, I.; Grimm, C. et al.
Description: Project X is based on a 3 GeV CW superconducting linac and is currently in the R&D phase awaiting CD-0 approval. The low-energy section of the Project X H{sup -} linac includes three types of super-conducting single spoke cavities operating at 325 MHz. SSR0 (18 cavities), SSR1 (20 cavities) and SSR2 (44 cavities) have a geometrical beta of {beta} = 0.11, 0.21 and 0.4 respectively. Single spoke cavities were selected for the linac in virtue of their higher r/Q values compared to standard Half Wave Resonator. Quarter Wave Resonators were not considered for such a high frequency. In this paper we present the decisions and analyses that lead to the final design of SSR0. Electro-magnetic and mechanical finite element analyses were performed with the purpose of optimizing the electro-magnetic design, minimizing frequency shifts due to helium bath pressure fluctuations and providing a pressure rating for the resonators that allow their use in the cryomodules.
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DESIGN OF SMALL AUTOMATION WORK CELL SYSTEM DEMONSTRATIONS

DESIGN OF SMALL AUTOMATION WORK CELL SYSTEM DEMONSTRATIONS

Date: December 1, 2000
Creator: TURNER, C.; PEHL, J. & AL, ET
Description: The introduction of automation systems into many of the facilities dealing with the production, use and disposition of nuclear materials has been an ongoing objective. Many previous attempts have been made, using a variety of monolithic and, in some cases, modular technologies. Many of these attempts were less than successful, owing to the difficulty of the problem, the lack of maturity of the technology, and over optimism about the capabilities of a particular system. Consequently, it is not surprising that suggestions that automation can reduce worker Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) levels are often met with skepticism and caution. The development of effective demonstrations of these technologies is of vital importance if automation is to become an acceptable option for nuclear material processing environments. The University of Texas Robotics Research Group (UTRRG) has been pursuing the development of technologies to support modular small automation systems (each of less than 5 degrees-of-freedom) and the design of those systems for more than two decades. Properly designed and implemented, these technologies have a potential to reduce the worker ORE associated with work in nuclear materials processing facilities. Successful development of systems for these applications requires the development of technologies that meet the requirements of ...
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Design of Small Impact-Resistant RTGs for Global Network of Unmanned Mars Landers

Design of Small Impact-Resistant RTGs for Global Network of Unmanned Mars Landers

Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Schock, Alfred
Description: Presented at the 42nd Congress of the IAF, October 5-11, 1991 in Montreal, Canada. This paper presents the results of Fairchild's work in support of DOE to perform RTG design studies for this mission. The key problem in designing these RTGs is how to enable the generators to tolerate substantially higher g-loads than those encountered on previous RTG missions. The Fairchild studies resulted in designs of compact RTGs based on flight-proven and safety-qualified heat source components, with a number of novel features designed to provide the desired high impact tolerance. The present paper describes those designs and their rationale, and a preliminary, quasi-static impact analysis that yielded very encouraging results. They indicate that these RTGs have sufficient impact resistance to enable survival of landers without retrorockets. This would result in significant cost savings. There are four copies in the file. Two copies of a presentation with the same title by Al Schock dated June 26/27, 1991 is attached. There are two copies of a Fairchild document, undated included. There is also two copies dated 6/26/1991 with the report number FSC-ESD-217-91-495 and one copy of a ducument, dated 7/11/191 with the report number FSC-ESD-217-91-495A. There are four copies with the same ...
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Design of Small Impact-Resistant RTGs for Global Network of Unmanned Mars Landers

Design of Small Impact-Resistant RTGs for Global Network of Unmanned Mars Landers

Date: June 26, 1991
Creator: Schock, Alfred
Description: Ongoing studies by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the robotic exploration of Mars contemplate a network of at least twenty small and relatively inexpensive landers distributed over both low and high latitudes of the Martian globe. They are intended to explore the structural, mineralogical, and chemical characteristics of the Martian soil, search for possible subsurface trapped ice, and collect long-term seismological and meteorological data over a period of ten years. They can also serve as precursors for later unmanned and manned Mars missions.; The collected data will be transmitted periodically, either directly to Earth or indirectly via an orbiting relay. The choice of transmission will determine the required power, which is currently expected to be between 2 and 12 watts(e) per lander. This could be supplied either by solar arrays or by Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Solar-powered landers could only be used for low Martian latitudes, but RTG-powered landers can be used for both low and high latitudes. Moreover, RTGs are less affected by Martian sandstorms and can be modified to resist high-G-load impacts. High impact resistance is a critical goal. It is desired by the mission designers, to minimize the mass and complexity of the system ...
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Design of software and hardware components for a six-degrees of freedom optical position sensor

Design of software and hardware components for a six-degrees of freedom optical position sensor

Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Garcia, F.N.
Description: This report summarizes the evaluation of a fully compatible and operational data acquisition system for a six-degrees of freedom optical sensor (SixDOF). The SixDOF, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by Charles Vann, is capable of tracking an object`s position in all its six degrees of freedom without any datum specification by means of two reflective surfaces mounted on the object. To make the SixDOF operational and thus validate its underlying physics, a signal processing system has been designed so that information from the sensor is transferred accurately and efficiently to a computer. In addition, a six-degrees of freedom positioning stage has been built in efforts to calibrate the sensor in real time. A crucial design constraint is the necessity to build the complete data acquisition system so that it be small and most importantly portable. The prototype of the SixDOF system proved to be capable of crudely detecting changes in the position of an object in all six spatial degrees of freedom. An accuracy of around 0.5 mm is estimated presently even though the position of the two reflectors on the object is seen to significantly influence the accuracy of the sensor. The resolution of the sensor is not ...
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Design of spatial experiments: Model fitting and prediction

Design of spatial experiments: Model fitting and prediction

Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Fedorov, V.V.
Description: The main objective of the paper is to describe and develop model oriented methods and algorithms for the design of spatial experiments. Unlike many other publications in this area, the approach proposed here is essentially based on the ideas of convex design theory.
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Design of standards for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material

Design of standards for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material

Date: May 1997
Creator: Smith, H. A., Jr.; Stewart, J. E. & Ruhter, W.
Description: Nondestructive assay (NDA) of special nuclear material (SNM) involves a variety of measurement techniques, instruments, and nuclear materials. High-quality measurements require well-characterized SNM standards that represent the expected range of mass, chemical composition, and physical properties of the SNM to be measured. Due to the very limited commercial availability of NDA standards, facilities must usually produce their own standards, both to meet their specific measurement needs and to comply with existing regulations. This paper will describe the current extent to which NDA standards are commercially available. The authors will further describe the types of NDA standards used to calibrate and verify the measurement techniques commonly used in the safeguards of SNM. Several types of NDA standards will be discussed in detail to illustrate the considerations that go into specifying and designing traceable, representative standards for materials accounting measurements.
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Design of Storage Systems Using Multiple Storage Technologies in Renewable Systems

Design of Storage Systems Using Multiple Storage Technologies in Renewable Systems

Date: January 17, 2001
Creator: Lamont, A.
Description: Energy systems that rely on intermittent renewable sources typically use storage devices to improve their reliability. Large scale systems can be expected to cycle the storage capacity on cycles ranging from a day to a year. It can be cost effective to use several storage technologies as a system. A very efficient technology can be used for the smaller daily cycles even if it has a high capital cost. Conversely, a technology having a low efficiency but a low capital cost can be used for the larger longer period cycles. This paper presents a method for determining the optimal capacities for a set of storage technologies. It is analogous to techniques used in electric generation capacity planning that use a load duration curve along with the capital and operating costs of various generations technologies. Here we derive a function that describes throughput as a function of capacity and use it along with the capital and operating costs (including efficiencies) of the storage technologies to derive the optimal capacities.
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Design of Superconducting Multi-Spoke Cavities for High-Velocity Applications

Design of Superconducting Multi-Spoke Cavities for High-Velocity Applications

Date: July 1, 2011
Creator: Hopper, C. S. & Delayen, J. R.
Description: Superconducting spoke cavities have been designed and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0} ~ 0.6 and are currently being designed for velocities up to {beta}{sub 0} = 1. We present the electromagnetic designs for two-spoke cavities operating at 325 MHz for {beta}{sub 0} = 0.82 and {beta}{sub 0} = 1.
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Design of Superconducting Parallel Bar Deflecting and Crabbing rf Structures

Design of Superconducting Parallel Bar Deflecting and Crabbing rf Structures

Date: May 1, 2009
Creator: Jean Delayen, Haipeng Wang
Description: A new concept for a deflecting and crabbing rf structure based on half-wave resonant lines was introduced recently*. It offers significant advantages to existing designs and, because of it compactness, allows low frequency operation. This concept has been further refined and optimized for superconducting implementation. Results of this optimization and application to a 400 MHz crabbing cavity and a 499 MHz deflecting cavity are presented.
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Design of Surface Micromachined Compliant MEMS

Design of Surface Micromachined Compliant MEMS

Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Bradley, Joe Anthony
Description: The consideration of compliant mechanisms as Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is the focus of this research endeavor. MEMS are micron to millimeter devices that combine electrical, mechanical, and information processing capabilities on the same device. These MEMS need some mechanical motion or parts that move relative to each other. This relative motion, using multiple parts, is not desired because of the assembly requirement and the friction introduced. Compliant devices limits or eliminates friction and the need for multi-component assembly. Compliant devices improve designs by creating single piece mechanisms. The purpose of this research is to validate surface micromachining as a viable fabrication process for compliant MEMS designs. Specifically, this research has sought to fabricate a micro-compliant gripper and a micro-compliant clamp to illustrate the process. While other researchers have created compliant MEMs, most have used comb-drive actuation methods and bulk micromachining processes. This research focused on fully-compliant devices that use device flexibility for motion and actuation. Validation of these compliant MEMS is achieved by structural optimization of device design and functional performance testing. This research contributes to the ongoing research in MEMS by evaluating the potential of using surface micromachining as a process for fabricating compliant micro-mechanisms.
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Design of Surface micromachined Compliant MEMS

Design of Surface micromachined Compliant MEMS

Date: August 1, 2002
Creator: Bradley, Joe Anthony
Description: The consideration of compliant mechanisms as Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is the focus of this research endeavor. MEMS are micron to millimeter devices that combine electrical, mechanical, and information processing capabilities on the same device. These MEMS need some mechanical motion or parts that move relative to each other. This relative motion, using multiple parts, is not desired because of the assembly requirement and the friction introduced. Compliant devices limits or eliminates friction and the need for multi-component assembly. Compliant devices improve designs by creating single piece mechanisms. The purpose of this research is to validate surface micromachining as a viable fabrication process for compliant MEMS designs. Specifically, this research has sought to fabricate a micro-compliant gripper and a micro-compliant clamp to illustrate the process. While other researchers have created compliant MEMS, most have used comb-drive actuation methods and bulk micromachining processes. This research focuses on fully-compliant devices that use device flexibility for motion and actuation. Validation of these compliant MEMS is achieved by structural optimization of device design and functional performance testing. This research contributes to the ongoing research in MEMS by evaluating the potential of using surface micromachining as a process for fabricating compliant micro-mechanisms.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Design of surface texture for improved control of friction and formability of aluminum sheet products for automotive applications. Final technical report for period September 15, 1996 - July 14, 2000

Design of surface texture for improved control of friction and formability of aluminum sheet products for automotive applications. Final technical report for period September 15, 1996 - July 14, 2000

Date: September 12, 2001
Creator: Anand, L.
Description: The frictional properties of interfaces are of interest in a broad range of applications. We have formulated a new plasticity model for interface friction and applied it to represent the frictional characteristics of A16111-T4 sheet against D2 tool steel for sheet forming applications.
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Design of Survey X-Ray Spectrometer for NIF, NSS

Design of Survey X-Ray Spectrometer for NIF, NSS

Date: August 23, 2013
Creator: Ayers, S; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Feldman, R; Marlin, W; Schneider, M et al.
Description: Abstract not provided
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Design of the 26.7 MHz rf cavity for RHIC

Design of the 26.7 MHz rf cavity for RHIC

Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Rose, J.; Brodowski, J.; Deng, D.P.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Pirkl, W. & Ratti, A.
Description: The accelerating system for RHIC operates at 26.7 MHz (h = 342) and must capture the injected beam, accelerate it to top energy, and shorten the bunches prior to rebucketing into the storage (h = 2508) system. These different functions set the design parameters of the cavity. The frequency of 26.7 MHz has been chosen in order to provide large enough buckets to capture the injected beam from the AGS and a large linear region for debunching during a bunch rotation at top energy. Provision of the large linear region also dictates the voltage requirement of 400 kV per cavity. The cavity must be tuned {approximately}90 kHz to compensate for the change in speed of the gold beam.
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Design of the 28.15 MHz cavity for RHIC

Design of the 28.15 MHz cavity for RHIC

Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: J., Rose; Brodowski, J.; Deng, D.P.; Kwiatkoski, S.; Pirkl, W. & Ratti, A.
Description: .
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Design of the 3rd generation ECR ion source

Design of the 3rd generation ECR ion source

Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Lyneis, C.M.; Xie, Z.Q. & Taylor, C.E.
Description: Development of the 3rd Generation ECR ion source has progressed from a concept described in the last ECR Ion Source Workshop to the fabrication of a full scale prototype superconducting magnet structure. The prototype consists of three solenoid coils and six race track coils with iron poles forming the sextupole. The design calls for mirror fields of 4 T at injection and 3 T at extraction and for a radial field strength at the wall of 2.4 T. The prototype magnet will be tested this spring in an existing vertical cryostat to determine its operating characteristics including maximum operating values, training characteristics and to study the interaction between the solenoid and sextupole coils. Design of the ECR plasma chamber includes aluminum walls to provide an enhanced source of cold electrons, up to three separate microwave feeds to allow simultaneous heating of the plasma electrons at 10, 14 and 18 GHz or at 6, 10 and 14 GHz. Water cooling of the plasma chamber walls and the injection and extraction plates is planned so that up to 10 kW of microwave power can be used without excessive heating of the chamber components. Experience with the AECR-U at LBNL shows that increasing ...
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