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On the calculation of the 1 (center dot) P oscillating aerodynamic loads on single-rotation propellers in pitch on tractor airplanes

On the calculation of the 1 (center dot) P oscillating aerodynamic loads on single-rotation propellers in pitch on tractor airplanes

Date: May 1, 1955
Creator: Rogallo, Vernon L & Yaggy, Paul F
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the Calibration of Cascade Impactors

On the Calibration of Cascade Impactors

Date: August 31, 1962
Creator: Mercer, T. T.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the circulatory subsonic flow of a compressible fluid past a circular cylinder

On the circulatory subsonic flow of a compressible fluid past a circular cylinder

Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Bers, Lipman
Description: The circulatory subsonic flow around an infinite circular cylinder is computed using the linearized pressure-volume relation, by a method developed in a previous report. Formulas and graphs are given for the velocity and pressure distributions, the circulation, the lift, and the dependence of the critical Mach number upon the position of the stagnation point.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the continuation of a potential gas flow across the sonic line

On the continuation of a potential gas flow across the sonic line

Date: April 1, 1950
Creator: Bers, Lipman
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the Contribution of Turbulent Boundary Layers to the Noise Inside a Fuselage

On the Contribution of Turbulent Boundary Layers to the Noise Inside a Fuselage

Date: December 1, 1956
Creator: Corcos, G. M. & Liepmann, H. W.
Description: The following report deals in preliminary fashion with the transmission through a fuselage of random noise generated on the fuselage skin by a turbulent boundary layer. The concept of attenuation is abandoned and instead the problem is formulated as a sequence of two linear couplings: the turbulent boundary layer fluctuations excite the fuselage skin in lateral vibrations and the skin vibrations induce sound inside the fuselage. The techniques used are those required to determine the response of linear systems to random forcing functions of several variables. A certain degree of idealization has been resorted to. Thus the boundary layer is assumed locally homogeneous, the fuselage skin is assumed flat, unlined and free from axial loads and the 'cabin' air is bounded only by the vibrating plate so that only outgoing waves are considered. Some of the details of the statistical description have been simplified in order to reveal the basic features of the problem. The results, strictly applicable only to the limiting case of thin boundary layers, show that the sound pressure intensity is proportional to the square of the free stream density, the square of cabin air density and inversely proportional to the first power of the damping constant ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the definition of the standard atmosphere

On the definition of the standard atmosphere

Date: April 1, 1921
Creator: Grimault, P
Description: On April 15, 1920, the under Secretary of State for Aeronautics and Aerial Transport decided to adopt as Standard Atmosphere for official airplane tests in France, the atmosphere defined by the following law, known as the Law of the S.T.You.(Technical Section of Aeronautics): From 0 to 11,000 m. - 0=15-0.0065 Z and above 11,000 m. - 0= -56.5 degrees being the temperature in centigrade degrees at altitude Z expressed in meters. For altitude 0 the pressure is 760 mm of mercury. In the magazine "L'Aeronautique" Mr. A. Toussaint has already written at length on the first studies which led to the elaboration of this law. Since that time the results obtained have been confirmed by fuller and more abundant data which have justified the official adoption of the Law of the S.T. You. The object of the present article is to give a summary exposition and discussion of the ideas and documents which form the basis of the question.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the design of airfoils in which the transition of the boundary layer is delayed

On the design of airfoils in which the transition of the boundary layer is delayed

Date: October 1, 1952
Creator: Tani, I.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the determination of certain basic types of supersonic flow fields

On the determination of certain basic types of supersonic flow fields

Date: November 1, 1954
Creator: Ferrari, Carlo
Description: A discussion is given of the application of Fourier series techniques to the problems of linearized supersonic flow. The formulation presented is an extension of the doublet type of "fundamental solution" to higher order types of singularity. The equations developed have application to wing theory but are primarily of importance in wing-body interaction problems. A specific example of a wing-body interference problem is discussed in light of the presented methods.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the determination of the take-off characteristics of a seaplane

On the determination of the take-off characteristics of a seaplane

Date: May 1, 1938
Creator: Perelmuter, A
Description: The present paper presents an attempt to coordinate the available theoretical and experimental data on planing surfaces so as to develop an approximate analytical method for the determination of the water resistance of a seaplane without any preliminary towing tests in the tank.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the development of turbulent wakes from vortex streets

On the development of turbulent wakes from vortex streets

Date: January 1, 1954
Creator: Roshko, Anatol
Description: Wake development behind circular cylinders at Reynolds numbers from 40 to 10,000 was investigated in a low-speed wind tunnel. Standard hot-wire techniques were used to study the velocity fluctuations. The Reynolds number range of periodic vortex shedding is divided into two distinct subranges. At r=40 to 150, called the stable range, regular vortex streets are formed and no turbulent velocity fluctuations accompany the periodic formation of vortices. The range r=150 to 300 is a transition range to a regime called the irregular range, in which turbulent velocity fluctuations accompany the periodic formation of vortices. The turbulence is initiated by laminar-turbulent transition in the free layers which spring from the separation points on the cylinder. The transition first occurs in the range r=150 to 300. Spectrum and statistical measurements were made to study the velocity fluctuations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department