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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1990-1999
3-dimensional wells and tunnels for finite element grids
Modeling fluid, vapor, and air injection and extraction from wells poses a number of problems. The length scale of well bores is centimeters, the region of high pressure gradient may be tens of meters and the reservoir may be tens of kilometers. Furthermore, accurate representation of the path of a deviated well can be difficult. Incorporating the physics of injection and extraction can be made easier and more accurate with automated grid generation tools that incorporate wells as part of a background mesh that represents the reservoir. GEOMESH is a modeling tool developed for automating finite element grid generation. This tool maintains the geometric integrity of the geologic framework and produces optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grids. GEOMESH creates a 3D well as hexagonal segments formed along the path of the well. This well structure is tetrahedralized into a Delaunay mesh and then embedded into a background mesh. The well structure can be radially or vertically refined and each well layer is assigned a material property or can take on the material properties of the surrounding stratigraphy. The resulting embedded well can then be used by unstructured finite element models for gas and fluid flow in the vicinity of wells or tunnels. This 3D well representation allows the study of the free- surface of the well and surrounding stratigraphy. It reduces possible grid orientation effects, and allows better correlation between well sample data and the geologic model. The well grids also allow improved visualization for well and tunnel model analysis. 3D observation of the grids helps qualitative interpretation and can reveal features not apparent in fewer dimensions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc668722/
3 MW, 110 GHz ECH system for the DIII-D tokamak
To support the Advanced Tokamak (AT) operating regimes in the DIII-D tokamak, methods need to be developed to control the current and pressure profiles across the plasma discharge. In particular, AT plasmas require substantial off-axis current in contrast to normal tokamak discharges where the current peaks on-axis. An effort is under way to use Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) as a method of sustaining the off-axis current in AT plasmas. The first step in this campaign is the installation of three megawatts of electron cyclotron heating power. This involves the installation of three rf systems operating at 110 GHz, the second harmonic resonance frequency on DIII-D, with each system generating nominally 1 MW. The three systems will use one GYCOM (Russian) gyrotron and two CPI (formerly Varian) gyrotrons, all with windowless evacuated corrugated low loss transmission lines. The first two of three 1 MW ECH systems is operating routinely at DIII-D with injected power at 110 GHz of approximately 1.5 MW with good power accountability. Transport experiments using modulated ECH have been performed confirming the power deposition location. On-axis and off-axis current drive experiments have been successfully performed with on-axis ECCD currents of 170 kA being observed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc707889/
3(omega) damage threshold evaluation of final optics components using Beamlet mule and off-line testing
A statistics-based model is being developed to predict the laser-damage-limited lifetime of UV optical components on the NIF laser. In order to provide data for the model, laser damage experiments were performed on the Beamlet laser system at LLNL. An early prototype NIF focus lens was exposed to twenty 35 1 nm pulses at an average fluence of 5 J/cm{sup 2}, 3ns. Using a high resolution optic inspection system a total of 353 damage sites was detected within the 1160 cm{sup 2} beam aperture. Through inspections of the lens before, after and, in some cases, during the campaign, pulse to pulse damage growth rates were measured for damage initiating both on the surface and at bulk inclusions. Growth rates as high as 79 {micro}m/pulse (surface diameter) were observed for damage initiating at pre-existing scratches in the surface. For most damage sites on the optic, both surface and bulk, the damage growth rate was approximately l0{micro}m/pulse. The lens was also used in Beamlet for a subsequent 1053 {micro}m/526 {micro}m campaign. The 352 {micro}m-initiated damage continued to grow during that campaign although at generally lower growth rate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc671790/
4.5 Meter high level waste canister study
The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Storage and Disposal Project has established the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IBLW) Storage Sub-Project to provide the capability to store Phase I and II BLW products generated by private vendors. A design/construction project, Project W-464, was established under the Sub-Project to provide the Phase I capability. Project W-464 will retrofit the Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB) to accommodate the Phase I I-ILW products. Project W-464 conceptual design is currently being performed to interim store 3.0 m-long BLW stainless steel canisters with a 0.61 in diameter, DOE is considering using a 4.5 in canister of the same diameter to reduce permanent disposal costs. This study was performed to assess the impact of replacing the 3.0 in canister with the 4.5 in canister. The summary cost and schedule impacts are described. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc682373/
4-D conformal field theories and strings on orbifolds
No abstract prepared. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc787075/
4. International reservoir characterization technical conference
This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc686653/
4 MW upgrade to DIII-D FWCD system: System commissioning and initial operation
The initial installation of the 4 MW fast wave current drive (FWCD) upgrade started in 1992 with the purchase of two ABB/Thomcast AG rf power amplifiers. These amplifiers cover the frequency range 30 MHz to 120 MHz. A maximum output power of over 2 MW between 30 MHz and 80 MHz and 1 MW at 120 MHz were the specification requirements. The system as installed is comprised of the two mentioned rf amplifiers, coaxial transmission and matching components, rf phase and amplitude monitoring, and a SUN SparcStation 10 control system. Due to various reasons almost every major component in the system required redesign and engineering in order to meet the system requirements. The failures, probable cause and the final redesigns will be discussed as well as some thoughts on how better to specify system requirements for future systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc683710/
5/10-MVA high temperature superconducting power transformer. Progress report for the period May 1998 - June 1999
No abstract prepared. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc723268/
5. annual clean coal technology conference: powering the next millennium. Volume 2
The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference focuses on presenting strategies and approaches that will enable clean coal technologies to resolve the competing, interrelated demands for power, economic viability, and environmental constraints associated with the use of coal in the post-2000 era. The program addresses the dynamic changes that will result from utility competition and industry restructuring, and to the evolution of markets abroad. Current projections for electricity highlight the preferential role that electric power will have in accomplishing the long-range goals of most nations. Increase demands can be met by utilizing coal in technologies that achieve environmental goals while keeping the cost- per-unit of energy competitive. Results from projects in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program confirm that technology is the pathway to achieving these goals. The industry/government partnership, cemented over the past 10 years, is focused on moving the clean coal technologies into the domestic and international marketplaces. The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference provides a forum to discuss these benchmark issues and the essential role and need for these technologies in the post-2000 era. This volume contains technical papers on: advanced coal process systems; advanced industrial systems; advanced cleanup systems; and advanced power generation systems. In addition, there are poster session abstracts. Selected papers from this proceedings have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc682318/
5. international workshop on the identification of transcribed sequences
This workshop was held November 5--8, 1995 in Les Embiez, France. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on mapping the human genome. Attention is focused on the following topics: transcriptional maps; functional analysis; techniques; model organisms; and tissue specific libraries and genes. Abstracts are included of the papers that were presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc679753/
5-level polysilicon surface micromachine technology: Application to complex mechanical systems
The authors recently reported on the development of a 5-level poly-ilicon surface micromachine fabrication process consisting of four levels of mechanical poly plus an electrical interconnect layer. They are now reporting on the first components designed for and fabricated in this process. These are demonstration systems, which definitively show that five levels of polysilicon provide greater performance, reliability, and significantly increased functionality. This new technology makes it possible to realize levels of system complexity that have so far only existed on paper, while simultaneously adding to the robustness of many of the individual subassemblies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc704489/
5 MeV Mott Polarimeter Development at Jefferson Lab
Low energy (E{sub k}=100 keV) Mott scattering polarimeters are ill- suited to support operations foreseen for the polarized electron injector at Jefferson Lab. One solution is to measure the polarization at 5 MeV where multiple and plural scattering are unimportant and precision beam monitoring is straightforward. The higher injector beam current offsets the lower cross-sections. Recent improvements in the CEBAF injector polarimeter scattering chamber have improved signal to noise. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc710223/
5 MeV Mott polarimeter for rapid precise electron beam polarization measurements
Low energy (E{sub k} = 100 keV) Mott scattering polarimeters are ill-suited to support operations foreseen for the polarized electron injector at Jefferson Lab. One solution is to measure the polarization at 5 MeV where multiple and plural scattering are unimportant and precision beam monitoring is straightforward. The higher injector beam current offsets the lower cross-sections; measured rates scale to 1 kHz/{mu}A with a 1 {mu}m thick gold target foil. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699263/
5-Volt and 4.6 V plateaus in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films
Additional plateaus with median voltages of {similar_to}4.6 V, and {similar_to}5 V have been observed on charging thin film lithium batteries with crystalline LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathodes to 5.3 V. Total charge extracted from the 4 V and the two additional plateaus corresponded to about 1Li/Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, but the distribution of capacity among the three plateaus varied from film to film. It is speculated that the additional plateaus result from formation of mixed spinel structures in which a fraction of the 8a sites areoccupied by Mn{sup 2+} or Mn{sup 4+} ions and a fraction of the Li{sup +} ions occupy the 16d sites. After charging to 5.3 V, the 4.6 V plateau disappeared, and the capacity of the 4 V plateau increased at the expense of that of the 5 V plateau. The latter change is attributed to movement of Mn{sup 3+} or Mn{sup 5+} ions from 8a to 16d sites. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc672866/
A 6.7 MeV cw RFQ linac
A 6.7-MeV 350 MHz, cw Radio Frequency Quadrupole proton linac has been designed and is being fabricated for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project at Los Alamos. This eight-meter long structure consists of four resonantly-coupled segments and is being fabricated using hydrogen furnace brazing as a joining technology. Details of the design and status of fabrication are reported. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc695009/
6 GeV synchrotron x-ray source: Conceptual design report. Supplement B - conceptual design of proposed beam lines for the 6 GeV light source
In this document, preliminary conceptual designs are presented for ten sample beamlines for the 6 GeV Light Source. These beamlines will accommodate investigations in solid-state physics, materials science, materials technology, chemical technology, and biological and medical sciences. In future, the designs will be altered to include new developments in x-ray optics and hardware technologies. The research areas addressed by the samples beamlines are as follows: Topography and Radiography/Tomography (section 2); Inelastic Scattering with Ultrahigh Energy Resolution (Section 3); Surface and Bulk Studies Using High Momentum Resolution (Section 4); Inelastic Scattering from Charge and Spin (Section 5); Advanced X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies (Section 6); Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies (Section 7); General Purpose Scattering for Materials Studies (Section 8); Multiple-Energy Anomalous-Dispersion Studies of Proteins (Section 9); Protein Crystallography (Section 10); Time- and Space-resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy (Section 11); Medical Diagnostic Facility (Section 12); and Transuranium Research Facility (Section 13). The computer systems to be used on the beamlines are also discussed in Section 14 of this document. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc683429/
(6)Li, (7)Li Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Lithium Coordination in Binary Phosphate Glasses
{sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to investigate the local coordination environment of lithium in a series of xLi{sub 2}O {center_dot} (1-x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glasses, where 0.05 {le} x {le} 0.55. Both the {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li show chemical shift variations with changes in the Li{sub 2}O concentration, but the observed {sup 6}Li NMR chemical shifts closely approximate the true isotropic chemical shift and can provide a measure of the lithium bonding environment. The {sup 6}Li NMR results indicate that in this series of lithium phosphate glasses the Li atoms have an average coordination between four and five. The results for the metaphosphate glass agree with the coordination number and range of chemical shifts observed for crystalline LiPO{sub 3}. An increase in the {sup 6}Li NMR chemical shift with increasing Li{sub 2}O content was observed for the entire concentration range investigated, correlating with increased cross-linking of the phosphate tetrahedral network by O-Li-O bridges. The {sup 6}Li chemical shifts were also observed to vary monotonically through the anomalous glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) minimum. This continuous chemical shift variation shows that abrupt changes in the Li coordination environment do not occur as the Li{sub 2}O concentration is increased, and such abrupt changes can not be used to explain the T{sub g} minimum. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc688268/
7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Beamline Initiative. Conceptual Design Report
The DOE is building a new generation 6-7 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source known as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility, to be completed in FY 1996, can provide 70 x-ray sources of unprecedented brightness to meet the research needs of virtually all scientific disciplines and numerous technologies. The technological research capability of the APS in the areas of energy, communications and health will enable a new partnership between the DOE and US industry. Current funding for the APS will complete the current phase of construction so that scientists can begin their applications in FY 1996. Comprehensive utilization of the unique properties of APS beams will enable cutting-edge research not currently possible. It is now appropriate to plan to construct additional radiation sources and beamline standard components to meet the excess demands of the APS users. In this APS Beamline Initiative, 2.5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on four straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional four bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these eight x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build standard beamline components to meet scientific and technological research demands of the Collaborative Access Teams. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Beamline Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. The document also describes the preconstruction R & D plans for the Beamline Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R & D. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283143/
7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Instrumentation Initiative. Conceptual Design Report
In this APS Instrumentation Initiative, 2.5-m-long and 5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on 9 straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional 9 bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these 18 x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build state-of-the-art insertion-device beamlines to meet scientific and technological research demands well into the next century. This new initiative will also include four user laboratory modules and a special laboratory designed to meet the x-ray imaging research needs of the users. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Instrumentation Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. According to these plans, this new initiative begins in FY 1994 and ends in FY 1998. The document also describes the preconstruction R & D plans for the Instrumentation Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R & D. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283119/
The 8.4 MW Modulator/Regulator Power Systems for the Electron Cyclotron Heating Facility Upgrade at DIII-D
Over the next three years the DIII-D National Fusion Facility at General Atomics will upgrade its electron cyclotron heating (ECH) capability from the present 3 MW at 110 GHz to 10 MW of injected microwave power. There will be ten gyrotron tubes supplied by five 8.4 MW modulator/regulator (M/R) power systems. The project has gained considerable leverage from the acquisition of surplus hardware from the MFTF program that was conducted at LLNL in the early 1980s. One of these systems had been refurbished and converted for use as an ECH power supply earlier. The experience gained and the lessons learned from operating that system have proved valuable in guiding the engineering of the new systems. This paper provides an overview of the power system design and a report on the present status of the project. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc715745/
8. annual national conference of black physics students -- A summary report
The primary goals of the conference were to: (1) Develop a peer/mentor network within the African-American physics community; (2) Inform African-American students in physics of the various academic and professional opportunities; and (3) Bring important academic, economic and political issues and developments in the field to the attention of the students. The conference program was designed to fulfill these goals and optimize the students` exposure to physics as a professional and its real-life applications in both industry and academia. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc684859/
8. annual U.S. hydrogen meeting: Proceedings
The proceedings contain 35 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Government`s partnership role for hydrogen technology development; Government/industry partnerships -- Demonstrations; Entering the market -- Partnerships in transportation; Hydrogen -- The aerospace fuel; Codes and Standards; Advanced technologies; and Opportunities for partnerships in the utility market. Of the three markets identified (transportation, power production, and village power) papers are presented dealing with the first two. Three parts of the transportation market were covered: cars, trucks, and buses. Progress was reported in both fuel cell and internal combustion engine vehicle propulsion systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701946/
The 8-GeV transfer line injection into main ring
Included in this report are a brief review of the design lattice of the 8-GeV beam transfer line and the Main Ring, the recent measurements on the 8-GeV line lattice function as well as that of the Main Ring at 8-GeV. The injection matching is a very important part of the MR operation. Mismatches such as energy, timing, or position are easily corrected because they cause oscillations which are visible on the Turn-By-Turn (TBT) TV monitor display. Mis-matches due to beta and dispersion functions are detected only by using the Flying Wire or by doing measurements during beam study. A new method which makes use of the available data from TBT hardware was used to obtain the beam phase space ellipse. Data taken from Main Ring at injection gives the beta function needed for transfer matching from 8-GeV line. The result of this measurement is also presented here. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793221/
9. international mouse genome conference
This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc687281/
9 M.y. record of southern Nevada climate from Yucca Mountain secondary minerals
Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation`s high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs within which the depth to water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present day arid to semi-arid climate, is considered a favorable attribute of the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relation between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible future transport and release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration. Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences, coupled with the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite, allow broadbrush reconstructions of climate patterns during the past 9 M.y. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc704690/
The 10,000-year debate
Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has developed into a respected tool within the reactor community. Now, this PRA technique is being applied to a new arena, the distant future of the nuclear waste repository. Problems are already testing the credibility of PRA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc686881/
10 CFR 830.120 Criterion 10, Independent Assessment: We`re here to help you!
Each organization performing activities in the DOE Weapons Complex is required to have an pendent assessment function. This is consistent from DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance to 10 CFR 830-120, sometimes referred to as the Price-Anderson rule. DOE Order 5700.6C, Criterion 10 Independent Assessment requires, `` Planned and periodic independent assessments shall be conducted to measure item quality and process effectiveness and to promote improvement. The organization performing independent assessments shall have sufficient authority and freedom from the line organization to carry out its responsibilities. Persons conducting independent assessments shall be technically qualified and knowledgeable in the areas assessed.`` 10 CFR 830.120, (c) Quality assurance criteria -- (3) Assessment -- (ii) Independent Assessment requires,``Independent assessments shall be planned and conducted to measure item and service quality, to measure the adequacy of work performance, and to promote improvement. The group performing independent assessments shall have sufficient authority and freedom from the line to carry out its responsibilities. Persons conducting independent assessments shall be technically qualified and knowledgeable in the areas assessed.`` digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793206/
A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a muon-muon collider
The performance parameters of a proton source which produces the required flux of muons for a 2-TeV on 2-TeV muon collider are: a beam energy of 10 GeV, a repetition rate of 30 Hz, two bunches per pulse with 5 x 10{sup 13} protons per bunch, and an rms bunch length of 3 nsec (1). Aside from the bunch length requirement, these parameters are identical to those of a 5-MW proton source for a spallation neutron source based on a 10-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) (2). The 10-GeV synchrotron uses a 2-GeV accelerator system as its injector, and the 2-GeV RCS is an extension of a feasibility study for a I-MW spallation source described elsewhere (3--9). A study for the 5-MW spallation source was performed for ANL site-specific geometrical requirements. Details are presented for a site-independent proton source suitable for the muon collider utilizing the results of the 5-MW spallation source study. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc669513/
A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a pulsed spallation source
A feasibility study for a pulsed spallation source based on a 5-MW, 10-GeV rapid proton synchrotron (RCS) is in progress. The integrated concept and performance parameters of the facility are discussed. The 10-GeV synchrotron uses as its injector the 2-GeV accelerator system of a 1-MW source described elsewhere. The 1-MW source accelerator system consists of a 400-MeV H{sup {minus}} linac with 2.5 MeV energy spread in the 75% chopped (25% removed) beam and a 30-Hz RCS that accelerates the 400-MeV beam to 2 GeV. The time averaged current of the accelerator system is 0.5 mA, equivalent to 1.04 {times} 10{sup 14} protons per pulse. The 10-GeV RCS accepts the 2 GeV beam and accelerates it to 10 GeV. Beam transfer from the 2-GeV synchrotron to the 10-GeV machine u highly efficient bunch-to-bucket injection, so that the transfer can be made without beam loss. The synchrotron lattice uses FODO cells of 90{degrees} phase advance. Dispersion-free straight sections are obtained using a missing magnet scheme. The synchrotron magnets are powered by dual-frequency resonant circuits. The magnets are excited at a 20-Hz rate and de-excited at 60-Hz. resulting in an effective 30-Hz rate. A key feature of the design of this accelerator system is that beam losses are minimized from injection to extraction, reducing activation to levels consistent with hands-on maintenance. Details of the study are presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc667953/
10. international mouse genome conference
Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc710506/
10 microsecond time resolution studies of Cygnus X-1
Time variability analyses have been applied to data composed of event times of X-rays emitted from the binary system Cygnus X-1 to search for unique black hole signatures. The X-ray data analyzed was collected at ten microsecond time resolution or better from two instruments, the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory (HEAO) A-1 detector and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA). HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA collected data from 1977--79 and from 1996 on with energy sensitivity from 1--25 keV and 2--60 keV, respectively. Variability characteristics predicted by various models of an accretion disk around a black hole have been searched for in the data. Drop-offs or quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the Fourier power spectra are expected from some of these models. The Fourier spectral technique was applied to the HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA data with careful consideration given for correcting the Poisson noise floor for instrumental effects. Evidence for a drop-off may be interpreted from the faster fall off in variability at frequencies greater than the observed breaks. Both breaks occur within the range of Keplerian frequencies associated with the inner edge radii of advection-dominated accretion disks predicted for Cyg X-1. The break between 10--20 Hz is also near the sharp rollover predicted by Nowak and Wagoner`s model of accretion disk turbulence. No QPOs were observed in the data for quality factors Q > 9 with a 95% confidence level upper limit for the fractional rms amplitude at 1.2% for a 16 M{sub {circle_dot}} black hole. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc692022/
10-MW demonstration of the gas suspension absorption process at TVA`s Center for Emissions Research. Final report
The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in cooperation with AirPol Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed a successful 17-month test program with the AirPol Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process at TVA`s Center for Emissions Research (CER). This project was selected by DOE for funding in the third round of the Clean Coal Technology Program. This 10-MW demonstration of the GSA FGD system at the CER was the first application of this technology in the U.S. The GSA test program, which was cofunded two-thirds by TVA and one-third by DOE/AirPol, was completed over a 17-month period from November 1, 1992 to March 31, 1993. This test program demonstrated that the GSA FGD technology could achieve high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (90+ percent) for a 2.7 percent sulfur (as-fired) coal application, while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), i.e., 0.03 lb/MBtu, in a four-field electrostatic precipitator. The reliability and operability of this system was also demonstrated in a 28-day, 24 hour/day, continuous run during which the GSA unit simultaneously achieved high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (90+ percent) and maintained particulate emissions below the NSPS. Also, the air toxics removal capabilities of the GSA system were determined in a series of tests. A 1-MW pulsejet baghouse (PJBH) pilot plant was also tested in conjunction with this GSA test program. This PJBH testing was initially cofunded by TVA and the Electric Power Research Institute, who were later joined by AirPol and DOE in sponsoring this PJBH testing. A 14-day PJBH demonstration run was also completed to confirm the reliability of this system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc621760/
13. international conference on the application of accelerators in research and industry. Final performance technical report
This report summarizes attendance at the conference, describes its session subjects and other activities, names its sponsoring organizations, and references where the papers published for it may be found (in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Vol. B 99 (1995)). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc679727/
13 point video tape quality guidelines
Until high definition television (ATV) arrives, in the U.S. we must still contend with the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) video standard (or PAL or SECAM-depending on your country). NTSC, a 40-year old standard designed for transmission of color video camera images over a small bandwidth, is not well suited for the sharp, full-color images that todays computers are capable of producing. PAL and SECAM also suffers from many of NTSC`s problems, but to varying degrees. Video professionals, when working with computer graphic (CG) images, use two monitors: a computer monitor for producing CGs and an NTSC monitor to view how a CG will look on video. More often than not, the NTSC image will differ significantly from the CG image, and outputting it to NTSC as an artist works enables the him or her to see the images as others will see it. Below are thirteen guidelines designed to increase the quality of computer graphics recorded onto video tape. Viewing your work in NTSC and attempting to follow the below tips will enable you to create higher quality videos. No video is perfect, so don`t expect to abide by every guideline every time. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc683025/
15.4% CuIn1-XGaXSe2-Based Photovoltaic Cells from Solution-Based Precursor Films
We have fabricated 15.4%- and 12.4%-efficient CuIn1-XGaXSe2 (CIGS)-based photovoltaic devices from solution-based electrodeposition (ED) and electroless-deposition (EL) precursors. As-deposited precursors are Cu-rich CIGS. Additional In, Ga, and Se are added to the ED and EL precursor films by physical vapor deposition (PVD) to adjust the final film composition to CuIn1-XGaXSe2. The ED and EL device parameters are compared with those of a recent world record, an 18.8%-efficient PVD device. The tools used for comparison are current voltage, capacitance voltage, and spectral response characteristics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc708462/
15. international conference on plant growth substances: Program -- Abstracts
Since the 14th Conference in Amsterdam in 1991, progress in plant hormone research and developmental plant biology has been truly astonishing. The five ``classical`` plant hormones, auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, ethylene, and abscisic acid, have been joined by a number of new signal molecules, e.g., systemin, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, whose biosynthesis and functions are being understood in ever greater detail. Molecular genetics has opened new vistas in an understanding of transduction pathways that regulate developmental processes in response to hormonal and environmental signals. The program of the 15th Conference includes accounts of this progress and brings together scientists whose work focuses on physiological, biochemical, and chemical aspects of plant growth regulation. This volume contains the abstracts of papers presented at this conference. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678130/
THE 15 LAYER SILICON DRIFT DETECTOR TRACKER IN EXPERIMENT 896.
Large linear silicon drift detectors have been developed and are in production for use in several experiments. Recently 15 detectors were used as a tracking device in BNL-AGS heavy ion experiment (E896). The detectors were successfully operated in a 6.2 T magnetic field. The behavior of the detectors, such as drift uniformity, resolution, and charge collection efficiency are presented. The effect of the environment on the detector performance is discussed. Some results from the experimental run are presented. The detectors performed well in an experimental environment. This is the first tracking application of these detectors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc620289/
The 16 August 1997 Novaya Zemlya seismic event as viewed from GSN stations KEV and KBS
Using current and historic seismic records from Global Seismic Network stations KEV and KBS, the authors find that S minus P arrival time comparisons between nuclear explosions and the 16 August 1997 seismic event (m{sub b} {approx} 3.6) from near Novaya Zemlya clearly indicate that (relative to KEV) the 16 August event occurred at least 80 km east of the Russian test site. Including S minus P arrival times from KBS constrains the location to beneath the Kara Sea and in good agreement with previously reported locations, over 100 km southeast of the test site. From an analysis of P{sub n}/S{sub n} waveform ratios at frequencies above 4 Hz, they find that the 16 August event falls within the population of regional earthquakes and is distinctly separated from Novaya Zemlya and other northern Eurasian nuclear explosion populations. Thus, given its location and waveform characteristics, they conclude the 16 August event was an earthquake. The 16 August event was not detected at teleseismic distances, and thus, this event provides a good example of the regional detection, location, and identification efforts that will be required to monitor the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty below m{sub b} {approx} 4. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc707595/
A 20 ampere shunt regulator for controlling individual magnets in a seriesed string
At the CEBAF accelerator, groups of dipole magnets are often connected together in series and powered from a single large constant-current regulated D-C supply, referred to locally as a {open_quotes}box{close_quotes} supply. Besides the economy realized, this configuration promotes correct field tracking of all elements of a beam transport channel. However, it is often desirable to vary the current in one element of a string independently of the others, particularly at the entrance and exits of transport channels. A 20 ampere programmable current shunt is described. Installed in parallel with the desired magnet, it permits shunting (bypassing) up to 5% of the string current around that magnet. The shunt regulator consists of a bank of MOSFET power transistors operated in linear mode. Regulation of current through the passbank is obtained by feedback from a manganin shunt maintained at a constant temperature for stability. The module is designed for remote operation and provides readbacks of various parameters useful for maintenance. To achieve complete electrical isolation, an onboard microprocessor provides remote communications via an opto-isolated serial data link. Constructional details and initial operating experience with the plug-in shunt are described. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc686377/
24 M meteorological tower data report period: January--December, 1994
This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc691234/
24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1995
This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. A previous report reported monitoring results for 1994. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1995, providing: a status of the measurement systems (including any quality assurance activities) during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc698276/
24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1996
This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1996, providing: a status of the measurement systems during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc692158/
25--30 T water cooled pulse magnet concept for neutron scattering experiment
The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory is in need of a high field, split-pair, pulse magnet that would provide a 25--30 T field in a 25 mm bore and 10 mm split gap for 2--4 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Single stack Bitter magnets of this type providing less than 20 T vertical field in the split gap have been constructed before. To produce higher fields, there is a need to use a multiple layer coil with internal reinforcement. The magnet should withstand up to 10{sup 7} cycles of loading and unloading. The authors have conducted a feasibility study that address these unique requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc712247/
25. anniversary of the 1973 oil embargo: Energy trends since the first major U.S. energy crisis
The purpose of this publication is not to assess the causes of the 1973 energy crisis or the measures that were adopted to resolve it. The intent is to present some data on which such analyses can be based. Many of the trends presented here fall into two distinct periods. From 1973 to the mid-1980`s, prices continued at very high levels, in part because of a second oil shock in 1979--80. During this period, rapid progress was made in raising American oil production, reducing dependence on oil imports, and improving end-use efficiency. After the oil price collapse of the mid-1980`s, however, prices retreated to more moderate levels, the pace of efficiency gains slowed, American oil production fell, and the share of imports rose. 30 figs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc708001/
A 30-T pulsed magnet suitable for neutron scattering experiments
We describe a conceptual design for a 30-T vertical-field split-pair magnet suitable for neutron scattering studies. While the magnet is primarily intended for diffraction and spectroscopic studies using a pulsed neutron source, it might also have application for relaxational studies,at steady-state sources. The magnet will have a 5-cm bore for sample environment equipment, a 1-cm gap for the neutrons to illuminate the sample and through which to observe the scattering. It will run with a repetition frequency of 2 Hz, and a pulse length of 3 ms. We discuss scientific and engineering considerations that led to this specification and describe the designs of both magnet and power supply. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793922/
A 40 GByte/s read-out system for GEM
The preliminary design of the read-out system for the GEM (Gammas, Electrons, Muons) detector at the Superconducting Super Collider is presented. The system reads all digitized data from the detector data sources at a Level 1 trigger rate of up to 100 kHz. A total read-out bandwidth of 40 GBytes/s is available. Data are stored in buffers that are accessible for further event filtering by an on-line, processor farm. Data are transported to the farm only as they are needed by the higher-level trigger algorithms, leading to a reduced bandwidth requirement in the Data Acquisition System. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc711824/
45-day safety screen results and final report for tank 241-C-202, auger samples 95-Aug-026 and 95-Aug-027
Two auger samples from tank 241-C-202 (C-202) were received at the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analysis, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. Two samples were submitted for energetics determination by DSC. Within the triplicate analyses of each sample, one of the results for energetics exceeded the notification limit. The sample and duplicate analyses for both augers exceeded the notification limit for TGA. As required by the Tank Characterization Plan, the appropriate notifications were made within 24 hours of official confirmation that the limits were violated. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc792323/
45-day safety screen results and final report for Tank 241-C-203, Auger samples 95 AUG-020 and 95-AUG-021
This document serves as the 45-day report deliverable for the tank C-203 auger samples collected on April 5, 1995 (samples 95-AUG-20 and 95-AUG-021). As no secondary analyses were required and no other analyses have been requested, this document also serves as the final report for C-203 auger sampling. Each sample was received, extruded, and analyzed by the 222-S Laboratories in accordance with the Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) referenced below. Included in this report are the primary safety screening results (DSC, TGA, and alpha) and density results. The worklists and raw data are included in this report. Photographs of the auger samples were taken during extrusion and, although not included in this report, are available. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc711652/
45-Day safety screen results and final report for Tank 241-SX-113, Auger samples 94-AUG-028 and 95-AUG-029
This document serves as the 45-day report deliverable for tank 241-SX-113 auger samples collected on May 9 and 10, 1995. The samples were extruded, and analyzed by the 222-S Laboratory. Laboratory procedures completed include: differential scanning calorimetry; thermogravimetric analysis; and total alpha analysis. This report incudes the primary safety screening results obtained from the analyses. As the final report, the following are also included: chains of custody; the extrusion logbook; sample preparation data; and total alpha analysis raw data. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793946/
45-Day safety screen results for Tank 241-B-112, auger samples 95-AUG-014 and 95-AUG-015
Two auger samples from Tank 241-B-112 (B-112) were received in the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analyses, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. All results for all analyses (DSC, TGA, and total alpha) were within the safety screening notification limits specified in the Tank Characterization Plan (TCP). No notification nor secondary analyses were required. Tank B-112 is not part of any of the four Watch Lists. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc695886/