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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1980-1989
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Alternatives for Conversion to Solid Interim Waste Forms of the Radioactive Liquid High-Level Wastes Stored at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center

Alternatives for Conversion to Solid Interim Waste Forms of the Radioactive Liquid High-Level Wastes Stored at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center

Date: August 1981
Creator: Vogler, S.; Trevorrow, L. E.; Ziegler, A. A. & Steindler, M. J.
Description: Techniques for isolating and solidifying the nuclear wastes in the storage tanks at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center plant have been examined. One technique involves evaporating the water and forming a molten salt containing the precipitated sludge. The salt is allowed to solidify and is stored in canisters until processing into a final waste form is to be done. Other techniques involve calcining the waste material, then agglomerating the calcine with sodium silicate to reduce its dispersibility. This option can also involve a prior separation and decontamination of the supernatant salt. The sludge and all resins containing fission-product activity are then calcined together. The technique of removing the water and solidifying the salt may be the simplest method for removing the waste from the West Valley Plant.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Alternatives for Disposal of Raffinate from the TRUEX Process

Alternatives for Disposal of Raffinate from the TRUEX Process

Date: December 1989
Creator: Trevorrow, L. E. & Vandegrift, G. F.
Description: Possible methods for disposing of the immobilized raffinate from TRUEX processing are reviewed. The purpose of the TRUEX process is to extract transuranium elements from high-level and TRU wastes into a small volume that can be managed at lower cost than that of the original wastes. The raffinate from the TRUEX process, containing negligible concentrations of transuranium elements, would be combined with salt solutions also derived from processing high-level waste, and the mixture would be converted to grout.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Alumina Miniplant Operations: Separation of Aluminum Chloride Liquor from Leach Residue Solids by Classification and Thickening

Alumina Miniplant Operations: Separation of Aluminum Chloride Liquor from Leach Residue Solids by Classification and Thickening

Date: 1983
Creator: Sorensen, Roy T.; Sawyer, Dwight L., Jr. & Turner, Theodore L.
Description: Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over recovery methods of alumina through leaching of kaolin clay. The materials, equipment, and procedures used are discussed. This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Anahuac: Biological Resources

Anahuac: Biological Resources

Date: 1983
Creator: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Description: Map showing biological resources (birds, oysters, fishes, grasses, etc.) in the Anahuac region of the Texas Barrier Islands coastline area. Scale 1:100,000.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Anahuac: Mineral Resources and Selected Oil and Gas Infrastructure

Anahuac: Mineral Resources and Selected Oil and Gas Infrastructure

Date: 1983
Creator: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Description: Map showing mineral resources (oil, gas, sand, clay, etc.) in the Anahuac region of the Texas Barrier Islands coastline area. Scale 1:100,000.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Anahuac: Socioeconomic and Natural Features

Anahuac: Socioeconomic and Natural Features

Date: 1983
Creator: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Description: Map showing various sites and features (recreation sites, water treatment facilities, public lands, historic sites, transportation, etc.) in the Anahuac region of the Texas Barrier Islands coastline area. Scale 1:100,000.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of an Internally Pressurized Prismatic Cell Can

Analysis of an Internally Pressurized Prismatic Cell Can

Date: April 1980
Creator: Majumdar, S.
Description: This report contains an elastic stress and displacement analysis of a prismatic cell can subjected to internal pressure. A computer program was written to perform the analysis. The results show that, for the geometry chosen, the thicknesses of the cell-can walls and the magnitude of the internal pressure are the most important parameters that determine the stresses and deformations of the cell can. Recommendations for future studies are included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of Cracked Core Spray Injection Line Piping from the Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors

Analysis of Cracked Core Spray Injection Line Piping from the Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors

Date: December 1983
Creator: Diercks, D. R.
Description: Elbow assemblies and adjacent piping from the loops A and B core spray injection lines of Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors have been examined in order to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages and flaw indications detected during hydrostatic tests and subsequent ultrasonic inspections. The elbow assemblies were found to contain multiple intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zones. The cracking was predominantly axial in orientation in the forged elbow and wedge components, whereas mixed axial and circumferential cracking was seen in the wrought piping pieces. In at least two instances, axial cracks completely penetrated the circumferential weld joining adjacent components. Based upon the observations made in the present study, the failures were attributed to intergranular stress corrosion cracking caused by the weld-induced sensitized microstructure and residual stresses present; dissolved oxygen in the reactor coolant apparently served as the corrosive species. The predominantly axial orientation of the cracks present in the forged components is believed to be related to the banded microstructure present in these components. The metallographic studies reported are supplemented by x-radiography, chemical analysis and mechanical test results, determinations of the degree of sensitization present, and measurements of weld metal delta ferrite ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of Heat-Pipe Absorbers in Evacuated-Tube Solar Collectors

Analysis of Heat-Pipe Absorbers in Evacuated-Tube Solar Collectors

Date: February 1986
Creator: Hull, John R.; Schertz, William W. & Allen, John W.
Description: Heat transfer in evacuated-tube solar collectors with heat-pipe absorbers is compared with that for similar collectors with flow-through absorbers. In systems that produce hot water or other heated fluids, the heat-pipe absorber suffers a heat transfer penalty compared with the flow-through absorber, but in many cases the penalty can be minimized by proper design at the heat-pipe condenser and system manifold. The heat transfer penalty decreases with decreasing collector heat loss coefficient, suggesting that evacuated tubes with optical concentration are more appropriate for use with heat pipes than evacuated or non-evacuated flat-plate collectors. When the solar collector is used to drive an absorption chiller, the heat-pipe absorber has better heat transfer characteristics than the flow-through absorbers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Analysis of Proposed Gamma-Ray Detection System for the Monitoring of Core Water Inventory in a Pressurized Water Reactor

Analysis of Proposed Gamma-Ray Detection System for the Monitoring of Core Water Inventory in a Pressurized Water Reactor

Date: December 1987
Creator: Markoff, Diane Melanie
Description: An initial study has been performed of the feasibility of employing an axial array of gamma detectors located outside the pressure vessel to monitor the coolant in a PWR. A one-dimensional transport analysis model is developed for the LOFT research reactor and for a mock-PWR geometry. The gamma detector response to coolant voiding in the core and down-comer has been determined for both geometries. The effects of various conditions (for example, time after shutdown, materials in the transport path, and the relative void fraction in different water regions) on the detector response are studied. The calculational results have been validated by a favorable comparison with LOFT experimental data. Within the limitations and approximations considered in the analysis, the results indicate that the gamma-ray detection scheme is able to unambiguously respond to changes in the coolant inventory within any vessel water region.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department