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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Notes
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Aerodynamic characteristics at Reynolds numbers of 3.0 x 10(exp 6) and 6.0 x 10(exp 6) of three airfoil sections formed by cutting off various amounts from the rear portion of the NACA 0012 airfoil section

Aerodynamic characteristics at Reynolds numbers of 3.0 x 10(exp 6) and 6.0 x 10(exp 6) of three airfoil sections formed by cutting off various amounts from the rear portion of the NACA 0012 airfoil section

Date: April 1, 1950
Creator: Smith, Hamilton A & Schaefer, Raymond F
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of 15 NACA airfoil sections at seven Reynolds numbers from 0.7 x 10(exp 6) to 9.0 x 10(exp 6)

Aerodynamic characteristics of 15 NACA airfoil sections at seven Reynolds numbers from 0.7 x 10(exp 6) to 9.0 x 10(exp 6)

Date: October 1, 1949
Creator: Loftin, Laurence K , Jr & Smith, Hamilton A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees

Aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Penland, Jim A
Description: Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.88, a Reynolds number of 129,000, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. An evaluation of the crossflow theory is made through comparison of present results with available crossflow Mach number drag coefficients.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The aerodynamic characteristics of a model wing having a split flap deflected downward and moved to the rear

The aerodynamic characteristics of a model wing having a split flap deflected downward and moved to the rear

Date: May 1, 1932
Creator: Weick, Fred E & Harris, Thomas E
Description: Tests were made on a model wing with three different sized split trailing-edged flaps, in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. The flaps were formed of the lower rear portion of the wing and were rotated downward about axes at their front edges. The lift, drag, and center of pressure were measured with the axis in its original position and also with it moved back in even steps to the trailing edge of the main wing, giving in effect an increase in area. The split flaps when deflected about their original axis locations gave slightly higher maximum lift coefficients than conventional trailing-edge flaps, and the lift coefficients were increased still further by moving the axes toward the rear. The highest value of C(sub L max), which was obtained with the largest flap hinged at 90 per cent of the chord from the leading edge, was 2.52 as compared with 1.27 for the basic wing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of a number of modified NACA four-digit-series airfoil sections

Aerodynamic characteristics of a number of modified NACA four-digit-series airfoil sections

Date: June 1, 1948
Creator: Loftin, Laurence K , Jr & Cohen, Kenneth S
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail flying-boat hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes

Aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail flying-boat hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes

Date: June 1, 1952
Creator: Riebe, John M & Naeseth, Rodger L
Description: An investigation was made in the Langley 300-mph 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes and, for comparison, a streamline body simulating the fuselage of a modern transport airplane. The results of the tests indicated that the configurations incorporating a forebody with a length-beam ratio of 7 had lower minimum drag coefficients than the configurations incorporating a forebody with length-beam ratio of 5. The lowest minimum drag coefficients, which were considerably less than that of a conventional hull and slightly less than that of a streamline body, were obtained on the length-beam-ratio-7 forebody, alone and with round center boom. Drag coefficients and longitudinal- and lateral-stability parameters presented include the interference of a 21-percent-thick support wing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of a small-scale shrouded propeller at angles of attack from 0 to 90 degrees

Aerodynamic characteristics of a small-scale shrouded propeller at angles of attack from 0 to 90 degrees

Date: November 1, 1955
Creator: Parlett, Lysle P
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller

Aerodynamic characteristics of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller

Date: January 1, 1953
Creator: Solomon, William
Description: Characteristics are given for the two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and for the two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller over a range of advance ratio from 0.5 to 3.8, through a blade-angle range from 20 degrees to 55 degrees measured at the 0.75 radius. Maximum efficiencies of the order of 91.5 to 92 percent were obtained for the propellers. The propeller with the thinner airfoil sections over the outboard portion of the blades, the NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller, had lower losses at high tip speeds, the difference amounting to about 5 percent at a helical tip Mach number of 1.10.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils as affected by surface roughness

The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils as affected by surface roughness

Date: April 1, 1933
Creator: HOCKER RAY W
Description: The effect on airfoil characteristics of surface roughness of varying degrees and types at different locations on an airfoil was investigated at high values of the Reynolds number in a variable density wind tunnel. Tests were made on a number of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 0012 airfoil models on which the nature of the surface was varied from a rough to a very smooth finish. The effect on the airfoil characteristics of varying the location of a rough area in the region of the leading edge was also investigated. Airfoils with surfaces simulating lap joints were also tested. Measurable adverse effects were found to be caused by small irregularities in airfoil surfaces which might ordinarily be overlooked. The flow is sensitive to small irregularities of approximately 0.0002c in depth near the leading edge. The tests made on the surfaces simulating lap joints indicated that such surfaces cause small adverse effects. Additional data from earlier tests of another symmetrical airfoil are also included to indicate the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with the Reynolds number for an airfoil with a polished surface and with a very rough one.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at negative angles of attack

The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at negative angles of attack

Date: March 1, 1932
Creator: Anderson, Raymond F
Description: A number of airfoils, including 14 commonly used airfoils and 10 NACA airfoils, were tested through the negative angle-of-attack range in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel at a Reynolds Number of approximately 3,000,000. The tests were made to supply data to serve as a basis for the structural design of airplanes in the inverted flight condition. In order to make the results immediately available for this purpose they are presented herein in preliminary form, together with results of previous tests of the airfoils at positive angles of attack. An analysis of the results made to find the variation of the ratio of the maximum negative lift coefficient to the maximum positive lift coefficient led to the following conclusions: 1) For airfoils of a given thickness, the ratio -C(sub L max) / +C(sub L max) tends to decrease as the mean camber is increased. 2) For airfoils of a given mean camber, the ratio -C(sub L max) / +C(sub L max) tends to increase as the thickness increases.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department