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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1990-1999
218 E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site clean closure soil evaluation report
This report summarizes the sampling activities undertaken and the analytical results obtained in a soil sampling and analyses study performed for the 218 E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site (218 E-8 Demolition Site). The 218 E-8 Demolition Site is identified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment unit that will be closed in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations. The site was used for the thermal treatment of discarded explosive chemical products. No constituents of concern were found in concentrations indicating contamination of the soil by 218 E-8 Demolition Site activities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc792808/
219-S chemical compatibility
This document consists of tables of the materials that make up the ''wetted'' parts of the 219-S waste handling facility and a combination of manufacturer lists of chemicals that are not recommended. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc742476/
221-U Facility concrete and reinforcing steel evaluations specification for the canyon disposition initiative (CDI)
This describes a test program to establish the in-situ material properties of the reinforced concrete in Building 221-U for comparison to the original design specifications. Field sampling and laboratory testing of concrete and reinforcing steel structural materials in Building 221-U for design verification will be undertaken. Forty seven samples are to be taken from radiologically clean exterior walls of the canyon. Laboratory testing program includes unconfined compressive strength of concrete cores, tensile strength of reinforcing steel, and petrographic examinations of concrete cores taken from walls below existing grade. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc683545/
222-S Analytical services final results for Tank 241-U-101, grab samples 1U-96-1 through 1U-96-4
This document is the final, format IV, laboratory report for characterization of tank 241-U-101 (U-101) grab samples from risers 1 and 7. It transmits additional analytical data for specific gravity (Sp.G.), and all raw analytical data which were not provided in the 45-day report. The 45-day report is attached to this final report as Part II. Secondary analyses were not performed on any of the U-101 samples. This is because none of the primary analyte limits, which trigger the performance of secondary analyses, were exceeded. Grab samples were taken on May 29, 1996 and May 30, 1996 from risers 1 and 7, respectively, and were received at the 222-S Laboratory on the same days that they were collected. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Tank Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) for this tank and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). The samples were analyzed for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), total alpha activity (AT), visual appearance, bulk density, and specific gravity. A sample data summary table, includes sample analytical data accompanied by quality control data (for example, duplicate, spike, blank and standard results and detection limits and counting efforts). The table includes data for DSC, TGA, AT, bulk density, volume percent solids and Sp.G. analyses. Data regarding the visual appearance of samples, volume percent solids and density of the solids are provided in tabular form of the 45-day report (attached as Part II). The table of the 45-day report also associates the original customer sample number with corresponding laboratory sample numbers. The TSAP specified notification limits for only DSC and total alpha. Notification limits were not exceeded for DSC or total alpha analyses for any of the samples, consequently immediate notifications were not necessary and were not made. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc674164/
222-S Laboratory analytical report for tank 241-C-106, grab samples 6C-96-1 through 6C-96-16 {ampersand} 6C-96-17-FB
This document is the analytical report for grab samples 6C-96-1through 6C-96-16 and 6C-96-17-FB from tank 241-C-106. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623267/
222-S Laboratory maintenance implementation plan
This Maintenance Improvement Plan has been developed for maintenance functions associated with the 222-S Laboratory. This plan is developed from the guidelines presented by Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program (DOE 1994), Chapter 11. The objective of this plan is to provide information for establishing and identifying WMH conformance programs and policies applicable to implementation of DOE Order 4330.4B guidelines. In addition, this maintenance plan identifies the actions necessary to develop a cost effective and efficient maintenance program at 222-S Laboratory. Maintenance activities are mainly going to be performed by existing maintenance organizations within Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford (WMH). Most maintenance performed at 222-S Laboratory is performed by the 222-S Laboratory maintenance organization. This 222-S Laboratory Maintenance Implementation Plan provides the interface requirements and responsibilities as they apply specifically to 222-S Laboratory. This document provides an implementation schedule which has been developed for items considered to be deficient or in need of improvement. The discussion section as applied to 222-S Laboratory implementation has been developed from a review of programs and practices utilizing the graded approach. Biennial review and additional reviews are conducted as significant programmatic and mission changes are made. This document is revised as necessary to keep this document current and in compliance with DOE requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc685822/
222-S laboratory quality assurance plan
This document provides quality assurance guidelines and quality control requirements for analytical services. This document is designed on the basis of Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) technical guidelines and is used for governing 222-S and 222-SA analytical and quality control activities. The 222-S Laboratory provides analytical services to various clients including, but not limited to, waste characterization for the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), waste characterization for regulatory waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD), regulatory compliance samples, radiation screening, process samples, and TPA samples. A graded approach is applied on the level of sample custody, QC, data verification, and data reporting to meet the specific needs of the client. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc693638/
222-S Laboratory Quality Assurance Plan. Revision 1
This Quality Assurance Plan provides,quality assurance (QA) guidance, regulatory QA requirements (e.g., 10 CFR 830.120), and quality control (QC) specifications for analytical service. This document follows the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) issued Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP). In addition, this document meets the objectives of the Quality Assurance Program provided in the WHC-CM-4-2, Section 2.1. Quality assurance elements required in the Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (QAMS-004) and Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans (QAMS-005) from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are covered throughout this document. A quality assurance index is provided in the Appendix A. This document also provides and/or identifies the procedural information that governs laboratory operations. The personnel of the 222-S Laboratory and the Standards Laboratory including managers, analysts, QA/QC staff, auditors, and support staff shall use this document as guidance and instructions for their operational and quality assurance activities. Other organizations that conduct activities described in this document for the 222-S Laboratory shall follow this QA/QC document. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623225/
222-S radioactive liquid waste line replacement and 219-S secondary containment upgrade, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to: (1) replace the 222-S Laboratory (222-S) radioactive liquid waste drain lines to the 219-S Waste Handling Facility (219-S); (2) upgrade 219-S by replacing or upgrading the waste storage tanks and providing secondary containment and seismic restraints to the concrete cells which house the tanks; and (3) replace the transfer lines from 219-S to the 241-SY Tank Farm. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508), and the DOE Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). 222-S is used to perform analytical services on radioactive samples in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System and Hanford Site environmental restoration programs. Activities conducted at 222-S include decontamination of analytical processing and support equipment and disposal of nonarchived radioactive samples. These activities generate low-level liquid mixed waste. The liquid mixed waste is drained through pipelines in the 222-S service tunnels and underground concrete encasements, to two of three tanks in 219-S, where it is accumulated. 219-S is a treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit, and is therefore required to meet Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations, and the associated requirements for secondary containment and leak detection. The service tunnels are periodically inspected by workers and decontaminated as necessary to maintain as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation levels. Although no contamination is reaching the environment from the service tunnels, the risk of worker exposure is present and could increase. 222-S is expected to remain in use for at least the next 30 years to serve the Hanford Site environmental cleanup mission. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc684089/
225-B ion exchange piping design documentation
This document describes the interface between the planned permanent ion exchange piping system and the planned portable ion exchange system. This is part of the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). In order to decouple this WESF from B-Plant and to improve recovery from a capsule leak, contaminated pool cell water will be recirculated through a portable ion exchange resin system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc677245/
225-B Pool Cell 5 Liner Leak Investigation
This document describes the actions taken to confirm and respond to a very small (0.046 ml/min) leak in the stainless steel liner of Hanford`s Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) storage pool cell 5 in Building 225-B. Manual level measurements confirmed a consistent weekly accumulation of 0.46 liters of water in the leak detection grid sump below the pool cell 5 liner. Video inspections and samples point to the capsule storage pool as the source of the water. The present leak rate corresponds to a decrease of only 0.002 inches per week in the pool cell water level, and consequently does not threaten any catastrophic loss of pool cell shielding and cooling water. The configuration of the pool cell liner, sump system, and associated risers will limit the short-term consequences of even a total liner breach to a loss of 1 inch in pool cell level. The small amount of demineralized pool cell water which has been in contact with the concrete structure is not enough to cause significant structural damage. However, ongoing water-concrete interaction increases. The pool cell leak detection sump instrumentation will be modified to improve monitoring of the leak rate in the future. Weekly manual sump level measurements continue in the interim. Contingency plans are in place to relocate the pool cell 5 capsules if the leak worsens. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc706165/
The 239 Pu(n,2n)238Pu cross section: preliminary calculations
The primary motivation for the present work is to provide theoretical values for the ratio of the partial <sup>239</sup>Pu(n,2nx{gamma})<sup>238</sup>Pu to total <sup>239</sup> Pu(n,2n)<sup>238</sup>Pu cross section for several discrete gamma transitions. Results and conclusions of preliminary calculations from threshold to 20 MeV are presented. Calculations are based on theoretical models with parameters obtained from the literature or from our ad hoc systematics. Optical model cross sections and transmission coefficients were determined using the coupled-channels method. The calculations included a preequilibrium component followed by multiple particle and gamma-ray emissions. Fission competition was included at all stages of de-excitation. Suggestions for further verifications and possible improvements are provided. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc625733/
241-AN-A pit leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-331 acceptance test procedure
This document describes the method used to test design criteria for Safety Class, Intrinsically Safe leak detector system installed in 241-AN-A Valve Pit located at 200E Tank Farms. The purpose of this Procedure is to demonstrate that the pit leak detection relay cabinet and intrinsically safe probe circuit is fully operable. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc742641/
241-AN-A valve pit manifold valves and position indication acceptance test procedure
This document describes the method used to test design criteria for gear actuated ball valves installed in 241-AN-A Valve Pit located at 200E Tank Farms. The purpose of this procedure is to demonstrate the following: Equipment is properly installed, labeled, and documented on As-Built drawings; New Manifold Valves in the 241-AN-A Valve Pit are fully operable using the handwheel of the valve operators; New valve position indicators on the valve operators will show correct valve positions; New valve position switches will function properly; and New valve locking devices function properly. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc736372/
241-AN-B pit leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-231 acceptance test procedure
This document describes the method used to test design criteria for Safety Class, Intrinsically Safe leak detector system installed in 241-AN-B Valve Pit located at 200E Tank Farms. The purpose of this Procedure is to demonstrate that the pit leak detection relay cabinet and intrinsically safe probe circuit is fully operable. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc741070/
241-AN-B valve pit manifold valves and position indication acceptance test procedure
This document describes the method used to test design criteria for gear actuated ball valves installed in 241-AN-B Valve Pit located at 200E Tank Farms. The purpose of this procedure is to demonstrate the following: Equipment is properly installed, labeled, and documented on As-Built drawings; New Manifold Valves in the 241-AN-B Valve Pit are fully operable using the handwheel of the valve operators; New valve position indicators on the valve operators will show correct valve positions; New valve position switches will function properly; and New valve locking devices function properly. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc741958/
241-AN Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report
This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AN double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc739661/
241-AW Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report
This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AW double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc743168/
241-AY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report
This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations. are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc740970/
241-AZ-101 pump removal trough analysis
As part of the current Hanford mission of environmental cleanup, various long length equipment must be removed from highly radioactive waste tanks. The removal of equipment will utilize portions of the Equipment Removal System for Project W320 (ERS-W320), specifically the 50 ton hydraulic trailer system. Because the ERS-W320 system was designed to accommodate much heavier equipment it is adequate to support the dead weight of the trough, carriage and related equipment for 241AZ101 pump removal project. However, the ERS-W320 components when combined with the trough and its` related components must also be analyzed for overturning due to wind loads. Two troughs were designed, one for the 20 in. diameter carriage and one for the 36 in. diameter carriage. A proposed 52 in. trough was not designed and, therefore is not included in this document. In order to fit in the ERS-W320 strongback the troughs were design with the same widths. Structurally, the only difference between the two troughs is that more material was removed from the stiffener plates on the 36 in trough. The reduction in stiffener plate material reduces the allowable load. Therefore, only the 36 in. trough was analyzed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc684060/
241-AZ Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report
This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-A2 double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc735946/
241-SX Fan driver sheave replacement
This SD documents revision of CVI 17443 which changes the type of motor sheaves driving the K1 fans in SX farm. This revision documents changing the driver (motor) sheave from a variable pitch to a fixed sheave. The drive sheave is changed in response to a recommendation from the Equipment Condition Monitoring Group. Changing the variable pitch sheave to a fixed pitch sheave is expected to reduce the vibration of the fan which will prolong the life of the equipment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc681099/
241-SX sludge profile temperature for March 1 to December 29, 1972
Data sheets containing 241-SX sludge profile temperatures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc688196/
241-SY-101 DACS High hydrogen abort limit reduction (SCR 473) acceptance test report
The capability of the 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) computer system to provide proper control and monitoring of the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank hydrogen monitoring system utilizing the reduced hydrogen abort limit of 0.69% was systematically evaluated by the performance of ATP HNF-4927. This document reports the results of the ATP. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc734596/
241-SY-101 DACS instrument problem screen (SCR 448) acceptance test procedure
The operability of the 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide proper control and monitoring of the mitigation mixer pump and instrumentation installed in the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank utilizing the [INSTPROB] screen will be systematically evaluated by the performance of this procedure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc724532/
241-SY-101 data acquisition and control system (DACS) operator interface upgrade operational test report
This procedure provides instructions for readiness of the first portion of the upgraded 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) computer system to provide proper control and monitoring of the mitigation mixer pump and instrumentation installed in the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank will be systematically evaluated by the performance of this procedure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc723375/
241-SY-101 data acquisition and control system (DACS) remote operator interface operational test report
The readiness of the upgraded 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide proper control and monitoring of the mixer pump and instrumentation in tank 241-SY-101 was evaluated by the performance of OTP-440-001. Results of the OTP are reported here. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc725533/
241-SY-101 mixer pump lifetime expectancy. Final report
The purpose of WHC-SD-WM-TI-726, Rev. 0 241-SY-101 Mixer Pump Lifetime Expectancy is to determine a best estimate of the mean lifetime of non-repairable (located in the waste) essential features of the hydrogen mitigation mixer pump presently installed in 101-SY. The estimated mean lifetime is 9.1 years. This report does not demonstrate operation of the entire pump assembly within the Tank Farm ``safety envelope``. It was recognized by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) this test pump was not specifically designed for long term service in tank 101-SY. In June 95 the DNFSB visited Hanford and ask the question, ``how long will this test pump last and how will the essential features fail?`` During the 2 day meeting with the DNFSB it was discussed and defined within the meeting just exactly what essential features of the pump must operate. These essential features would allow the pump to operate for the purpose of extending the window for replacement. Operating with only essential features would definitely be outside the operating safety envelope and would require a waiver. There are three essential features: 1. The pump itself (i.e. the impeller and motor) must operate 2. Nozzles and discharges leg must remain unplugged 3. The pump can be re-aimed, new waste targeted, even if manually. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc688231/
241-SY-101 mulitport riser acceptance for beneficial use
This document formally demonstrates that the Acceptance for Beneficial USE (ABU) process for the SY tank farm Multiport Riser assembly has been properly completed in accordance with the ABU checklist. For each item required on the ABU checklist, a bibliography of the documentation prepared and released to satisfy the requirement is provided digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678530/
241-SY-101 multi-functional instrument tree acceptance for beneficial use (ABU)
This document formally demonstrates that the ABU process for the 241-SY-101 risers 17B and 17C Multi-functional Instrument Trees (MIT`s) has been properly completed in accordance with the approved ABU checklists. For each item required on the ABU Checklist, a bibliography of the documentation prepared and released to satisfy the requirements is provided. Release of this documentation signifies that the tank farm Operations, Engineering, and Maintenance organizations have accepted responsibility for the MIT`S in 241-SY-101 Risers 17B and 17C digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc676012/
241-SY-101 strain concentration factor development via nonlinear analysis. Volume 1 of 1
The 241-SY-101 waste storage tank at the Hanford-Site has been known to accumulate and release significant quantities of hydrogen gas. An analysis was performed to assess the tank`s structural integrity when subjected to postulated hydrogen deflagration loads. The analysis addressed many nonlinearities and appealed to a strain-based failure criteria. The model used to predict the global response of the tank was not refined enough to confidently predict local peak strains. Strain concentration factors were applied at structural discontinuities that were based on steel-lined reinforced-concrete containment studies. The discontinuities included large penetrations, small penetrations, springline geometries, stud/liner connections, and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness transition. The only tank specific strain concentration factor applied in the evaluation was for the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness change in the dome. Review of the tank drawings reveals the possibility that a 4 inches Sch. 40 pipe penetrates the dome thickness transition region. It is not obvious how to combine the strain concentration factors for a small penetration with that of a thickness transition to arrive at a composite strain concentration factor. It is the goal of this effort to make an approximate determination of the relative significance of the 4 inch penetration and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch thickness transition in the 241-SY-101 dome geometry. This is accomplished by performing a parametric study with three general finite-element models. The first represents the thickness transition only, the second represents a 4 inch penetration only, and the third combines the thickness transition with a penetration model. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc684798/
241-SY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report
This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-SY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc735218/
241-T-107 interim stabilization flammable gas monitor system (safety class 3), acceptance test report
This Acceptance Test Report Provides the acceptance test to be performed at the vendor prior to delivery to Westinghouse Hanford Company. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678324/
241-Z-361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan
This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to support characterization of the sludge that remains in Tank 241-2-361. The procedures described in this SAP are based on the results of the 241-2-361 Sludge Characterization Data Quality Objectives (DQO) (BWHC 1999) process for the tank. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate the contents of Tank 241-2-361 in order to resolve safety and safeguards issues and to assess alternatives for sludge removal and disposal. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc739031/
241-Z-361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan
This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to support characterization of the sludge that remains in Tank 241-2-361. The procedures described in this SAP are based on the results of the 241-2-361 Sludge Characterization Data Quality Objectives (DQO) (BWHC 1999) process for the tank. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate the contents of Tank 241-2-361 in order to resolve safety and safeguards issues and to assess alternatives for sludge removal and disposal. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc738189/
242-A campaign 95-1 post run document
The 242-A Evaporator Campaign 95-1 was started on June 6, 1995 and finished July 27, 1995. An overall Waste Volume Reduction (WVR) of 8.18 million liters (2.16 mGAL OR 87.6% WVRF) was achieved from 9.35 million liters (2.47 Mgal) of processable waste contained in 108-AP, 107-AP, 106-AW and 102-AW. Slurry generated from Campaign 95-1 consisted of 1.05 million liters (278,000 gal) of dilute double-shell slurry feed (DDSSF) with a SpG of approximately 1.34. Total process condensate discharged to LERF was 10.3 million liters (2.72 Mgal), achieving a condensate/WVR efficiency ratio of 1.26. Total throughout for Campaign 95-1 was 18.1 million liters (4.79 Mgal). B Pond discharges from steam condensate and cooling water were 15.8 and 583 million liters (4.17 and 154 Mgal) respectively. Based on 145 hours of unplanned downtime, the 242-A Evaporator maintained an operating efficiency of 86% during the 49 day campaign. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678183/
242-A Campaign 99-1 process control plan
242-A Evaporator 99-1 will process approximately one million gallons of waste from tank 102-AW in June 1999. The process control Plan provides a general description of activities, which will occur during 242-A Evaporator Campaign 99-1 and to document analyses conducted to demonstrate that 102-AW waste is acceptable for processing. Predict is a registered trademark of Risk Decisions England Corporation, United Kingdom. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc738532/
242-A Control System device logic software documentation. Revision 2
A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534. This computer-based control system, called the Monitor and Control System (MCS), was installed in the 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and Monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment System Engineering Group of Westinghouse. This document describes the Device Logic for this system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc742669/
242-A Evaporator/plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) effluent treatment facility (ETF) nonradioactive air emission test report
This report shows the methods used to test the stack gas outlet concentration and emission rate of Volatile Organic Compounds as Total Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in parts per million by volume,grams per dry standard cubic meter, and grams per minute from the PUREX ETF stream number G6 on the Hanford Site. Test results are shown in Appendix B.1. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc706900/
242-A Evaporator quality assurance plan. Revision 2
The purpose of this quality assurance project plan (Plan) is to provide requirements for activities pertaining to sampling, shipping, and analyses associated with candidate feed tank samples for the 242-A Evaporator project. The purpose of the 242-A Evaporator project is to reduce the volume of aqueous waste in the Double Shell Tank (DST) System and will result in considerable savings to the disposal of mixed waste. The 242-A Evaporator feed stream originates from DSTs identified as candidate feed tanks. The 242-A Evaporator reduces the volume of aqueous waste contained in DSTs by boiling off water and sending the condensate (called process condensate) to the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LEPF) storage basin where it is stored prior to treatment in the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The objective of this quality assurance project plan is to provide the planning, implementation, and assessment of sample collection and analysis, data issuance, and validation activities for the candidate feed tanks. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc733703/
242-A evaporator safety analysis report
This report provides a revised safety analysis for the upgraded 242-A Evaporator (the Evaporator). This safety analysis report (SAR) supports the operation of the Evaporator following life extension upgrades and other facility and operations upgrades (e.g., Project B-534) that were undertaken to enhance the capabilities of the Evaporator. The Evaporator has been classified as a moderate-hazard facility (Johnson 1990). The information contained in this SAR is based on information provided by 242-A Evaporator Operations, Westinghouse Hanford Company, site maintenance and operations contractor from June 1987 to October 1996, and the existing operating contractor, Waste Management Hanford (WMH) policies. Where appropriate, a discussion address the US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders applicable to a topic is provided. Operation of the facility will be compared to the operating contractor procedures using appropriate audits and appraisals. The following subsections provide introductory and background information, including a general description of the Evaporator facility and process, a description of the scope of this SAR revision,a nd a description of the basic changes made to the original SAR. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc718442/
242-A Evaporator Waste Analysis Plan. Revision 5
This Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) provides the plan for obtaining information needed for proper waste handling and processing in the 242-A Evaporator (Evaporator) located on the Hanford Site. In particular it addresses analysis necessary to manage the waste according to Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303 and Parts 264 and 265 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Regulatory and safety issues are addressed by establishing boundary conditions for waste received and treated at the 242-A Evaporator. The boundary conditions are set by establishing limits for items such as potential exothermic reactions, waste compatibility, and control of vessel vent organic emissions. Boundary conditions are also set for operational considerations and to ensure waste acceptance at receiving facilities. The issues that are addressed in this plan include prevention of exotherms in the waste, waste compatibility, and vessel vent emissions. Samples from the other streams associated with the Evaporator are taken as required by Process Control Plans but are excluded from this plan because either the streams do not contain dangerous waste or the analyses are not required by WAC 173-303-300. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc792213/
242-A/LERF programmable Logic Controller Ladder. Revision 1
This document defines and describes the user-generated application software written to transmit digital and analog signals from the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) to the 242-A Evaporator Distributed Control System (DCS). PLCs and modems were installed in the 242-A Evaporator by Project W-105 (LERF) to transmit 6 analog liquid level signals, 6 range alarms based on the analog signals, and 6 leak detection and pump status signals to the 242-A Distributive Control System (DCS) from LERF. Communications between the two facilities are also monitored and alarm on the DCS. Following the Project W-105 completion, the communications and signal mix were modified by Project C-018H (ETF). The current PLC software (including ladder logic and data tables), PLC hardware settings, and modern option settings to transmit the signals and monitor communications are documented and described in this document. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc707619/
242-A MCS Logic Acceptance Test Report for Year 2000 Upgrade
242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. Testing was performed per test procedure HNF-3568. There were no unresolved exceptions. The system responded correctly to all testing and meets the requirements to operate the 242-A This report documents the acceptance test results for the Evaporator facility. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc742769/
250 MW single train CFB cogeneration facility. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994
This Technical Progress Report (Draft) is submitted pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27403 between the Department of Energy (Morgantown Energy Technology Center) and York County Energy Partners, L.P. a wholly owned project company of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. covering the period from January 1994 to the present for the York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. The Technical Progress Report summarizes the work performed during the most recent year of the Cooperative Agreement including technical and scientific results. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc687863/
283-E and 283-W Hazards Assessment
This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activites for the 283-E and 283-W Facilities on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc665462/
284-E Powerhouse trench engineering study
This document provides the basis for future use of the 284-E Powerhouse Trench as a transport conduit for effluents discharged from the 284-E Powerhouse in accordance with the requirements of the State Waste Discharge Permit, ST 4502. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc675329/
296-B-5 Stack monitoring and sampling system annual system assessment report
The B Plant Administration Manual requires an annual system assessment to evaluate and report the present condition of the sampling and monitoring system associated with Stack 296-B-5 at B Plant. The sampling and monitoring system associated with stack 296-B-5 is functional and performing satisfactorily. This document is an annual assessment report of the systems associated with the 296-B-5 stack. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc677283/
296-B-10 stack monitoring and sampling system annual system assessment report
B Plant Administration Manual, requires an annual system assessment to evaluate and report the present condition of the sampling and monitoring system associated with stack 296-B-10 at B Plant. The ventilation system of WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility) is designed to provide airflow patterns so that air movement throughout the building is from areas of lesser radioactivity to areas of greater radioactivity. All potentially contaminated areas are maintained at a negative pressure with respect to the atmosphere so that air flows into the building at all times. The exhaust discharging through the 296-B-10 stack is continuously monitored and sampled using a sampling and monitoring probe assembly located approximately 17.4 meters (57 feet) above the base of the stack. The probe assembly consists of 5 nozzles for the sampling probe and 2 nozzles to monitor the flow. The sampling and monitoring system associated with Stack 296-B-10 is functional and performing satisfactorily. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc690099/
296-B-13 stack monitoring and sampling system: Annual system assessment report
This report presents the details of the annual system assessment of the air pollution monitoring and sampling system for the 296-13 stack at the Hanford site. Topics discussed include; system description, system status, system aging, spare parts considerations, long term maintenance plan, trends, and items requiring action. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc704035/