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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1990-1999
500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers
Technology project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide NOx emissions from coal-fired boilers. The primary objective of the demonstration is to determine the long-term NOx reduction performance of advanced overfire air (AOFA), low NOx burners (LNB), and advanced digital control/optimization methodologies applied in a stepwise fashion to a 500 MW boiler. The focus of this paper is to report (1) on the installation of three on-line carbon-in-ash monitors and (2) the design and results to date from the advanced digital control/optimization phase of the project. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc624125/
500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1995
This document discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 (500 MW) near Rome, Georgia. Specifically, the objectives of the projects are: (1) demonstrate in a logical stepwise fashion the short-term NO{sub x} reduction capabilities of the following advanced low NO{sub x} combustion technologies: advanced overfire air (AOFA); low NO{sub x} burners (LNB); LNB with AOFA; and advanced digital controls and optimization strategies; (2) determine the dynamic, long-term emissions characteristics of each of these combustion NO{sub x} reduction methods using sophisticated statistical techniques; (3) evaluate the cost effectiveness of the low NO{sub x} combustion techniques tested; and (4) determine the effects on other combustion parameters (e.g., CO production, carbon carryover, particulate characteristics) of applying the above NO{sub x} reduction methods. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc696260/
500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1994, April 1994--June 1994
This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NOx burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters. Results are described. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc618430/
500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1995
This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. The project provides a stepwise evaluation of the following NO{sub x} reduction technologies: advanced overfire air (AOFA), low NO{sub x} burners (LNB), LNB with AOFA, and advanced digital controls and optimization strategies. The project has completed the baseline, AOFA, LNB, and LNB + AOFA test segments, fulfilling all testing originally proposed to DOE. Phase 4 of the project, demonstration of advanced control/optimization methodologies for NO{sub x} abatement, is now in progress. The methodology selected for demonstration at Hammond Unit 4 is the Generic NO{sub x} Control Intelligent System (GNOCIS), which is being developed by a consortium consisting of the Electric Power Research institute, PowerGen, Southern Company, Radian Corporation, U.K. Department of Trade and Industry, and US DOE. GNOCIS is a methodology that can result in improved boiler efficiency and reduced NO{sub x} emissions from fossil fuel fired boilers. Using a numerical model of the combustion process, GNOCIS applies an optimizing procedure to identify the best set points for the plant on a continuous basis. GNOCIS is designed to operate in either advisory or supervisory modes. Prototype testing of GNOCIS is in progress at Alabama Power`s Gaston Unit 4 and PowerGen`s Kingsnorth Unit 1. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc686399/
500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1994, July 1994--September 1994
This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise evaluation of the following NOx reduction technologies: Advanced overfire air (AOFA), Low NOx burners (LNB), LNB, with AOFA, and Advanced Digital Controls and Optimization Strategies. Baseline, AOFA, LNB, and LNB plus AOFA test segments have been completed. Based on a preliminary analysis, approximately 17 percent of the incremental change in NOx emissions between the LNB and LNB+AOFA configurations is the result of AOFA, the balance of the NOx reduction resulting from other operational adjustments. Preliminary diagnostic testing was conducted during August and September. The purpose of these tests was to determine the emissions and performance characteristics of the unit prior to activation of the advanced control/optimization strategies. Short-term, full load NOx emissions were near 0.47 lb/MBtu, slightly higher than that seen during the LNB+AOFA test phase. Long-term NO{sub x} emissions for this quarter averaged near 0.41 lb/MBtu. Due to turbine problems, a four week outage has been planned for Hammond 4 starting October 1. Two on-line carbon-in-ash monitors are being installed at Hammond Unit 4 as part of the Wall-Fired Project. These monitors will be evaluated as to their accuracy, repeatability, reliability, and serviceability. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc621183/
500 MW Demonstration of Advanced Wall-Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers
This report presents the results of a US Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc668931/
500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Public design report (preliminary and final)
This Public Design Report presents the design criteria of a DOE Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 (500 MW) near Rome, Georgia. The technologies being demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NO{sub x} burner. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NO{sub x} burners, advanced overfire systems, and digital control system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc672735/
500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter, 1994, October 1994--December 1994
This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. The project provides a stepwise evaluation of the following NOx reduction technologies: Advanced overfire air (AOFA), Low NOx burners (LNB), LNB with AOFA, and Advanced Digital Controls and Optimization Strategies. The project has completed the baseline, AOFA, LNB, and LNB+AOFA test segments, fulfilling all testing originally proposed to DOE. Analysis of the LNB long-term data collected show the full load NOx emission levels to be near 0.65 lb/MBtu. This NOx level represents a 48 percent reduction when compared to the baseline, full load value of 1.24 lb/MBtu. These reductions were sustainable over the long-term test period and were consistent over the entire load range. Full load, fly ash LOI values in the LNB configuration were near 8 percent compared to 5 percent for baseline. Results from the LNB+AOFA phase indicate that full load NOx emissions are approximately 0.40 lb/MBtu with a corresponding fly ash LOI value of near 8 percent. Although this NOx level represents a 67 percent reduction from baseline levels, a substantial portion of the incremental change in NOx emissions between the LNB and LNB+AOFA configurations was the result of operational changes and not the result of the AOFA system. Phase 4 of the project is now underway. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619676/
A 600-kV double-pulser for the PHERMEX electron gun
The PHERMEX (Pulsed High Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays) Radiographic Facility is a 50-MHz, 3-Cavity, RF-Linac driven by a pulsed, thermionic electron-gun Injector. The PHERMEX is used to take flash radiographs using x-rays at a single time in an explosively driven event. To investigate the time evolution of these events requires two things: (1) a multiple-pulser to drive the electron-gun Injector and (2) a large-format, gamma-ray, camera system to record a scintillator at the different times. The authors report the recent success of developing a reliable double-pulser that consists of two Marx generators that independently charge two PFLs that are switched out at about 1.4 MV. The PFLs are connected in series by large diaphragm switches that are independently laser triggered by two quadrupled-YAG lasers. Recent tests of the system into a dummy load, produced two high quality 600 kV pulses separated by 1.0 {micro}s. Each pulse has a FWHM of 90 ns, a 50 ns flat-top {+-} 3%, and a risetime of 25 ns and a falltime of 35 ns. The interpulse time is variable up to about 275 {micro}s; the first switch is kept closed by a keep alive inductor. The system has produced a 50 shot sequence of two pulses with a 1-sigma jitter < 1 ns. The system has been modeled using TOSCA-3D, FLUX-2D, and a transmission line model run with the circuits code Micro-CAP. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc694569/
An 800-MeV proton beam spill calculation
Using LAHET, the Los Alamos High-Energy Transport code, the authors calculated the radiation hazard from an 800-MeV proton beam spill at the bending magnet. Neutron doses were calculated at an area above the 84.0-cm-thick concrete roof, where there existed a gap with only 30.48-cm concrete shielding. The authors also studied the effect of the gap and proposed a corrective action. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc686347/
An 800-MeV proton radiography facility for dynamic experiments
The capability has been successfully developed at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) to utilize a spatially and temporally prepared 800-MeV proton beam to produce proton radiographs. A series of proton bursts are transmitted through a dynamically varying object and transported, via a unique magnetic lens system, to an image plane. The magnetic lens system permits correcting for the effects of multiple coulomb scattering which would otherwise completely blur the spatially transmitted information at the image plane. The proton radiographs are recorded on either a time integrating film plate or with a recently developed multi-frame electronic imaging camera system. The latter technique permits obtaining a time dependent series of proton radiographs with time intervals (modulo 358 ns) up to many microseconds and variable time intervals between images. One electronically shuttered, intensified, CCD camera is required per image. These cameras can detect single protons interacting with a scintillating fiber optic array in the image plane but also have a dynamic range which permits recording radiographs with better than 5% statistics for observation of detailed density variations in the object. A number of tests have been carried out to characterize the quality of the proton radiography system for absolute mass determination, resolution, and dynamic range. Initial dynamic experiments characterized the temporal and spatial behavior of shock propagation in high explosives with up to six images per experiment. Based on experience with the prototype system, a number of upgrades are being implemented including the anticipated capability for enhanced mass discrimination through differential multiple coulomb scattering radiographs and more images with improved imaging techniques. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc676221/
919: Evidence for K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} from E787
A collaboration from KEK, INS, Osaka, TRIUMF, Princeton, and BNL is currently running E787 at the AGS. The experiment is designed primarily to search for the rare decay K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, with an expected branching ratio of {approximately} 10{sup {minus}10}. The authors report evidence that they have observed this decay. They also discuss the future outlook for the experiment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc691092/
100KE/KW fuel storage basin surface volumetric factors
This Supporting Document presents calculations of surface Volumetric factors for the 100KE and 100KW Fuel Storage Basins. These factors relate water level changes to basin loss or additions of water, or the equivalent water displacement volumes of objects added to or removed from the basin. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc686510/
11th Topical conference high-temperature plasma diagnostics. Book of abstracts
This report contains abstracts from the 11th topical conference on high-temperature plasma diagnostics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc668631/
129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results
An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc690525/
1300-nm gain obtained with dysprosium-doped chloride crystals
Dy{sup 3+} - doped chloride crystals have high 1300-nm emission quantum yields. Pump - probe experiments on La Cl{sub 3}:Dy{sup 3+} demonstrate optical gain consistent with predictions based on spectroscopic cross sections and lifetimes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc665716/
137Cs(90Sr) and Pu isotopes in the Pacific Ocean sources &amp; trends
The main source of artificial radioactivity in the world`s oceans can be attributed to worldwide fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Measurements of selected artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean were first conducted in the 1960`s where it was observed that fallout radioactivity had penetrated the deep ocean. Extensive studies carried out during the 1973-74 GEOSECS provided the first comprehensive data on the lateral and vertical distributions of {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes in the Pacific on a basin wide scale. Estimates of radionuclide inventories in excess of amounts predicted to be delivered by global fallout alone were attributed to close-in fallout and tropospheric inputs from early U.S. tests conducted on Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Equatorial Pacific. In general, levels of fallout radionuclides (including {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes) in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean have decreased considerably over the past 4 decades and are now much more homogeneously distributed. Resuspension and the subsequent deposition of fallout radionuclides from previously deposited debris on land has become an important source term for the surface ocean. This can be clearly seen in measurements of fallout radionuclides in mineral aerosols over the Korean Peninsula (Yellow dust events). Radionuclides may also be transported from land to sea in river runoff-these transport mechanisms are more important in the Pacific Ocean where large quantities of river water and suspended sands/fluvial sediments reach the coastal zone. Another unique source of artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean is derived from the slow resolubilization and transport of radionuclides deposited in contaminated lagoon and slope sediments near U.S. and French test sites. Although there is a small but significant flux of artificial radionuclides depositing on the sea floor, > 80% of the total 239, {sup 240}Pu inventory and > 95% of the total {sup 137}Cs inventory remains in the water column. Studies conducted through the 1980`s appear to be consistent with earlier findings and indicate that radionuclide inventories in mid-northern latitudes are at least a factor of two above those expected from global fallout alone. The long term persistence of close-in and/or stratospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands still appears to be the only plausible explanation for this anomaly. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc690481/
1400 Liter 1.8K Test Facility
A double bath superfluid helium dewar has been constructed and operated at Fermilab`s Magnet Test Facility. The 1.8 K portion of the dewar is sized to contain a superconducting magnet up to 0.5 meters in diameter and 4 meters long in a vertical orientation in 0.12 MPa pressurized superfluid. The dewar can also provide a subcooled Helium I environment for tests; the entire temperature range from 4.4 K to 1. 8 K at 0.12 MPa is available. This paper describes the system design, lambda plate, heat exchanger, and performance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc697110/
The 16th Werner Brandt Workshop on charged particle penetration phenomena
This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: impact parameter dependence of charge transfer and energy loss; nonlinear dynamical response of the electron gas: comparison of some simple theories; stopping of ultrarelativistic ions in solids (33.2-TeV {sup 108}Pb); collective excitation in reduced dimensionality; collective states in atoms and cluster; plasmon coupling with external probes; atomic collisions with antiprotons; layer-number scaling in ultra-thin film stopping and energetics; atom-surface scattering under classical conditions; nonlinear effect of sweeping-out electrons in stopping power and electron emission in cluster impacts; electron emission from fast grazing collisions of ions with silicon surfaces; electron emission from ultra-thin carbon foils by kiV ions; Auger rates for highly charged ions in metals; Auger and plasmon assisted neutralization at surfaces; low energy (< 5eV) F{sup +} and F{sup -} ions transmission through condensed layers of water: enhancement and attenuation processes; charge transfer for H interacting with Al: atomic levels and linewidths; scattered projectile angular and charge state distributions for grazing collisions of multicharged ions with metal and insulator single crystal targets; the prolate hyperboloidat model in scanning probe microscopy; scanning probe microscopy of large biomolecules; microcantilever sensors; solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for electron transport using analytic spatial moments; and effective charge parametrization for z = 3-17 projectiles in composite targets. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc668184/
18th U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference. Program
This conference explored the latest developments in low-level radioactive waste management through presentations from professionals in both the public and the private sectors and special guests. The conference included two continuing education seminars, a workshop, exhibits, and a tour of Envirocare of Utah, Inc., one of America's three commercial low-level radioactive waste depositories. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc627581/
1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change on trace gases and the biosphere
This proposal seeks multi-agency funding to conduct an international, multidisciplinary 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change to take place from August 7 through 21, 1988, on the topic: Trace Gases and the Biosphere. The institute, to be held in Snowmass, Colorado, is envisioned as a pilot version of a continuing series of institutes on Global Change (IGC). This proposal seeks support for the 1988 pilot institute only. The concept and structure for the continuing series, and the definition of the 1988 pilot institute, were developed at an intensive and multidisciplinary Summer Institute Planning Meeting in Boulder, Colorado, on August 24--25, 1987. The theme for the 1988 PIGC, Trace Gases and the Biosphere, will focus a concerted, high-level multidisciplinary effort on a scientific problem central to the Global Change Program. Dramatic year-to-year increases in the global concentrations of radiatively-active trace gases such as methane and carbon dioxide are now well documented. The predicted climatic effects of these changes lend special urgency to efforts to study the biospheric sources and sinks of these gases and to clarify their interactions and role in the geosphere-biosphere system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc695679/
1989 OCRWM [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] Bulletin compilation and index
The OCRWM Bulletin is published by the Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to provide current information about the national program for managing spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This document is a compilation of issues from the 1989 calendar year. A table of contents and one index have been provided to assist in finding information contained in this year`s Bulletins. The pages have been numbered consecutively at the bottom for easy reference. 7 figs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc620406/
1990 Activity report for 1986-1992
As discussed in last year`s Activity Report, a fairly complete analysis of SPEAR problems was performed in concert with SLAC, and a major maintenance/improvement process was initiated in the spring of 1989. This run made it apparent that SPEAR will remain a very useful and impressive synchrotron radiation storage ring for at least a decade, given a steady maintenance and improvement program. More details about SPEAR functioning during the run, as well as SPEAR improvements, are contained in Chapter I. The formal SPEAR injector construction project was completed in November, 1990, on-time and on-budget. Although DOE was not able to provide anticipated FY90 commissioning funds, preliminary commissioning was performed and 2.3 GeV injection to SPEAR was demonstrated. A discussion of the Injector project is contained in Chapter II. Commissioning of the injector and the injector/SPEAR complex is continuing in 1991 with Users participating during the May-September period. This user participation allowed normal experimentation, so that systems could be tested critically, but with the commissioning process having higher priority than data acquisition. Another major event in 1990 was the full dedication of SPEAR to the synchrotron radiation program. Previously SPEAR was considered a high energy physics machine that was partially dedicated to synchrotron radiation. The full dedication means that the accelerator can be modified and improved for synchrotron radiation research. Despite the heavy emphasis on completing the Injector, many beam line improvements were achieved, as described in Chapter IV. Among these was the optimization of stations 6-2 and 10-2, the provision of a considerably larger hutch for Station 1-5, which contains the area detector diffractometer, and the introduction of white light capability on 10-2. The provision of good beam during the month of April made an appreciable amount of experimentation possible. These and other runs are described in Chapter VI. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc627283/
1990 Fischer Standard study
The purpose of this work is to develop a set of Titanium areal density standards for calibration and maintenance of the Fischer`s X-ray Fluorescence measurement system characterization curve program. The electron microprobe was calibrated for Titanium films on ceramic substrates using an existing set of laboratory standards (Quantity: 6 Range: 0.310 to 1.605). Fourteen source assemblies were measured and assigned values. These values are based on a mean calculation, of five separate readings, from best curve fit equations developed form the plot of the laboratory standards areal density (Source Measure) versus electron microprobe measurement (reading). The best fit equations were determined using the SAS General Linear Modeling (GLM) procedure. Four separate best fit equations were evaluated (Linear, Quadratic, Cubic and Exponential). Areal density values for the Fischer Standards appear here ordered by best fit equation based on maximum R{sup 2}. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc675224/
1991 Annual report to the National Science Foundation
This report contains discussions by researcher of the center on the computation and visualization of geometric structures. Most of the research involves the following: development of research software; exploration of mathematical structures; and computational crystal growth. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc698703/
1991 annual report to the National Science Foundation
The Geometry Center research program has a number of different aspects, most of which involve longer term commitments, such as, development of research software, teams of individuals visually exploring mathematical structures and sponsoring of workshops. The Center is built on the research programs of its faculty. These programs have flourished and interacted under the Center umbrella. There are many interconnections and commonalities between the fields represented. Here, a summary of the research work of each of the faculty members. Some of the research topics are geometric calculus of variations, group theory, geometric algorithms, and computer graphics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc691686/
1991 OCRWM bulletin compilation and index
The OCRWM Bulletin is published by the Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, to provide current information about the national program for managing spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The document is a compilation of issues from the 1991 calendar year. A table of contents and an index have been provided to reference information contained in this year`s Bulletins. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc625655/
1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project
Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623086/
1992-1993 Bonneville Appliance Efficiency Program: Showerhead Evaluation Volume II - Appendices
This report included the appendices for 1992-1993 Bonneville appliance efficiency program: showerhead evaluation. It consists of nine appendices, titled: Bonneville documents; overview of research projects; Puget Power and Light persistence study; hot-water flow analyses and assumptions documentation; regional end-use metering program; showerhead and faucet aerator performance assessment; Bonneville showerhead program distribution methods by participating utility; water- and energy-saving measure distribution methods literature review; REMP study load shape results. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc668047/
1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada
Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc665456/
1992 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress; Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240
This report summarizes the progress States and compact regions made during 1992 in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1992 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to section 7 (b) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc628173/
1992 annual report to the National Science Foundation
The Geometry Center research program has a number of different aspects. This report documents the work of the past year. The activities described here are organized under intertwined areas: manifold geometry and associated group theory; optimal geometries; dynamical systems; and computational geometry and computer graphics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc694529/
1992 PVUSA progress report
Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) electric generating systems. This report updates the progress of the PVUSA project, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1992, and summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions from work to date. Fall PV module costs and rising environmental pressures could make PV a significant source of large-scale power within the next decade. However, utility acceptance of this technology requires knowledge of PV operational characteristics in a utility system and confidence in predicting PV performance, reliability, and economics. PVUSA consists of two types of demonstrations: Emerging Module Technologies (EMTs), which are unproven but promising state-of-the-art PV technologies in 20-kW (nominal) arrays; and Utility Scale (US) systems, which represent more mature PV technologies in 200- to 500-kW (nominal) turnkey systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc696232/
The 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference: Issues for U.S. International Spectrum Policy
This report examines the U.S. preparations process for WARC-92, highlighting efforts to integrate the needs and concerns of various interest groups. It also reviews the forces and trends affecting the United States as it approaches WARC-92, and is intended to inform future congressional oversight of the domestic and international radio communication policy process. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc40002/
The 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference: Technology and Policy Implications
This paper examined the technologies and issues to be considered at World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC)-92, discusses the international and domestic context for WARC-93 preparations, and analyzed the U.S. process of conference preparation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39719/
The 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference: technology and policy implications
This report discusses the role of radio technologies and services in our daily lives. The report elaborates on the outcomes and implications for U.S. radio technology, and the next steps and lessons for the future. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc97319/
1993 Annual progress report for subsidiary agreement No. 2 (1991--1996) between AECL and US/DOE for a radioactive waste management technical co-operative program
A coordinated research program on radioactive waste disposal is being carried out by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the US Department of Energy. This annual report describes progress in the following eight studies: Fundamental materials investigations; In-situ stress determination; Development of a spent fuel dissolution model; Large block tracer test--Experimental testing of retardation models; Laboratory and field tests of in-situ hydrochemical tools; Cigar Lake--Analogue study, actinide and fission product geochemistry; Performance assessment technology exchange; and Development of multiple-well hydraulic test and field tracer test methods. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc664922/
1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity
This report provides a summary of many of the research projects completed by the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) during 1993. These research efforts continue to focus on two general areas: the study of, and search for, underlying scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems, and the exploration of new theories of computation that incorporate natural mechanisms of adaptation (mutation, genetics, evolution). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc687730/
The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site
This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc685225/
1993 Department of Energy Records Management Conference
This document consists of viewgraphs from the presentations at the conference. Topics included are: DOE records management overview, NIRMA and ARMA resources, NARA records management training, potential quality assurance records, filing systems, organizing and indexing technical records, DOE-HQ initiatives, IRM reviews, status of epidemiologic inventory, disposition of records and personal papers, inactive records storage, establishing administrative records, managing records at Hanford, electronic mail -- legal and records issues, NARA-GAO reports status, consultive selling, automated indexing, decentralized approach to scheduling at a DOE office, developing specific records management programs, storage and retrieval at Savannah River Plant, an optical disk case study, and special interest group reports. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc670247/
1993 PVUSA progress report
Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in module technology. This report updates the progress of the PVUSA project, review the status and performance of all PV installations during 1993, and summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions for the year. The PVUSA project has five objectives designed to narrow the gap between a large utility industry that is unfamiliar with PV, and a small PV industry that is aware of a potentially large utility market but unfamiliar with how to meet its requirements. The objectives are: to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of promising PV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components side-by-side at a single location; to assess PV system operation and maintenance (O and M) in a utility setting; to compare PV technologies in diverse geographic areas; to provide US utilities with hands-on experience in designing, procuring, and operating PV systems; and to document and disseminate knowledge gained from the project. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc691340/
1993 RCRA Part B permit renewal application, Savannah River Site: Volume 10, Consolidated Incineration Facility, Section C, Revision 1
This section describes the chemical and physical nature of the RCRA regulated hazardous wastes to be handled, stored, and incinerated at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site. It is in accordance with requirements of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.13(a) and(b), and 270.14(b)(2). This application is for permit to store and teat these hazardous wastes as required for the operation of CIF. The permit is to cover the storage of hazardous waste in containers and of waste in six hazardous waste storage tanks. Treatment processes include incineration, solidification of ash, and neutralization of scrubber blowdown. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc621412/
1993 to 1995 environmental surveillance data collected at or near Area G
This report summarizes Environmental Surveillance data collected by the Water Quality and Hydrology Group during 1993, 1994, and 1995 at or in the vicinity of TA-54, Area-G of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. The summary includes radiochemical, metals, general inorganic, and organic analytical results. The tables list measured concentrations (or detection limits for results below detection limits), analytical uncertainties for radiochemical data, sample locations, and sample dates. A map showing sample locations is also included. Preparation of this report was funded by the Solid Waste Management Group (CST-14) in support of the Waste Management Program. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc683941/
1994-95 Communications Plan
The 1994-1995 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Communications Plan - and the goals, objectives, strategies and actions that follow - are the products of almost a year of researching, evaluating and addressing LBL`s needs for effective internal and external communications programs. They grow from three contemporary realities undeniably bound to the future of the laboratory - (1) a diversified research mission that has splintered internal loyalties and commitments since LBL`s evolution from a one-purpose high energy physics lab; (2) a fiercely competitive science funding environment in the 1990`s; and (3) a continuing LBL identity crisis marked by public confusion over three `Lawrences; (the Livermore and Berkeley labs, plus the Berkeley campus` Hall of Science) and two `Berkeleys` (laboratory and campus). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc686373/
1994 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress
This report for calendar year 1994 summarizes the progress that states and compact regions made during the year in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Although events that have occurred in 1995 greatly alter the perspective in terms of storage versus disposal, the purpose of this report is to convey the concerns as evidenced during calendar year 1994. Significant developments occurring in 1995 are briefly outlined in the transmittal letter and will be detailed in the report for calendar year 1995. The report also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1994 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, and is prepared is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc667940/
1994 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1
The Y-12 Plant serves as a key manufacturing technology center for the development and demonstration of unique materials, components, and services of importance to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. This is accomplished through the reclamation and storage of nuclear materials, manufacture of nuclear materials, manufacture of components for the nation`s defense capabilities, support to national security programs, and services provided to other customers as approved by DOE. We are recognized by our people, the community, and our customers as innovative, responsive, and responsible. We are a leader in worker health and safety, environmental protection, and stewardship of our national resources. As a DOE facility, Y-12 also supports DOE`s waste minimization mission. Data contained in this report represents waste generation in Tennessee. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619830/
1994 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site
Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition. A few of the successful projects are: T-Plant helps facilities reuse equipment by offering decontamination services for items such as gas cylinders, trucks, and railcars, thus saving disposal and equipment replacement costs. Custodial Services reviewed its use of 168 hazardous cleaning products, and, through a variety of measures, replaced them with 38 safer substitutes, one for each task. Scrap steel contaminated with low level radioactivity from the interim stabilization of 107-K and 107-C was decontaminated and sold to a vendor for recycling. Site-wide programs include the following: the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) program at the Hanford site was launched during 1994, including a training class, a guidance document, technical assistance, and goals; control over hazardous materials purchased was achieved by reviewing all purchase requisitions of a chemical nature; the Office Supply Reuse Program was established to redeploy unused or unwanted office supply items. In 1994, pollution prevention activities reduced approximately 274,000 kilograms of hazardous waste, 2,100 cubic meters of radioactive and mixed waste, 14,500,000 kilograms of sanitary waste, and 215,000 cubic meters off liquid waste and waste water. Pollution Prevention activities also saved almost $4.2 million in disposal, product, and labor costs. Overall waste generation increased in 1994 due to increased work and activity typical for a site with an environmental restoration mission. However, without any Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention activities, solid radioactive waste generation at Hanford would have been 25% higher, solid hazardous waste generation would have been 30% higher, and solid sanitary waste generation would have been 60% higher. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619946/
1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program
This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc666001/
1994 Environmental monitoring drinking water and nonradiological effluent programs annual report
EG&G Idaho, Inc., initiated monitoring programs for drinking water in 1988 and for nonradiological parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents in 1985. These programs were initiated for the facilities operated by EG&G Idaho for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. On October 1, 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) replaced EG&G Idaho as the prime contractor at the INEL and assumed responsibility for these programs. Section I discusses the general site characteristics, the analytical laboratories, and sampling methodology general to both programs. Section 2, the Drinking Water Program, tracks the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters required by State and Federal regulations. This section describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at 17 LITCO-operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters detected and the regulatory limits exceeded during calendar year 1994. In addition, groundwater quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for LITCO production wells. Section 3 discusses the nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring results for 27 liquid effluent streams. These streams are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1994 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc621505/
The 1994 Fermilab Fixed Target Program
This paper highlights the results of the Fermilab Fixed Target Program that were announced between October, 1993 and October, 1994. These results are drawn from 18 experiments that took data in the 1985, 1987 and 1990/91 fixed target running periods. For this discussion, the Fermilab Fixed Target Program is divided into 5 major topics: hadron structure, precision electroweak measurements, heavy quark production, polarization and magnetic moments, and searches for new phenomena. However, it should be noted that most experiments span several subtopics. Also, measurements within each subtopic often affect the results in other subtopics. For example, parton distributions from hadron structure measurements are used in the studies of heavy quark production. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678437/