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3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. 1998 annual progress report
'The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are: (1) understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations; (2) developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field; (3) developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties. The authors laboratory experiments to date are described in Appendices A and B, which consist of two papers submitted to the annual SAGEEP conference (Frye et al., 1998; Sturrock et al., 1998). The experiments involved measurements of complex resistivity vs. frequency on a suite of brine saturated sandstone samples. In one set of experiments, the fluid chemistry (pH, ionic strength, and cation type) was varied. In a second set of experiments, the microgeometry of the rock matrix was varied. The experiments showed that spectral IP responses are sensitive to subtle variations in both the solution chemistry and rock microgeometry. The results demonstrate that spectral IP responses have the potential of being sensitive indicators of in-situ chemistry and microgeometry, the latter of which may be related to the hydraulic properties. Data Acquisition The authors have been looking in some detail at the effects of electromagnetic coupling and how to practically deal with it. In this area, the results to date are summarized in Vandiver (1998). The progress in the development of modeling and inversion algorithms for IP is described in Appendix C, a paper submitted to the annual SAGEEP conference (Shi et al., 1998). The authors have developed algorithms for forward modeling and inversion of spectral IP data in 3-D media. The algorithms accommodate a general earth model with a complex electrical conductivity as a function of frequency and 3-D spatial position. Using regularization and optimization techniques, the inversion algorithm obtains a 3-D image of resistivity amplitude and phase for each frequency contained in the data set. They have begun testing their algorithms on synthetic data generated from a simple model of a contaminant plume. The complex resistivity parameters of the background medium and plume are based on the laboratory results described above.' digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc625746/
3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997
'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. The first-year accomplishments are (1) laboratory experiments on fluid-saturated sandstones quantifying the dependence of spectral IP responses on solution chemistry and rock micro-geometry; (2) library research on the current understanding of electromagnetic coupling effects on IP data acquired in the field: and (3) development of prototype forward modeling and inversion algorithms for interpreting IP data in terms of 3-D models of complex resistivity.' digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc620009/
3-D Target Location from Stereoscopic SAR Images
SAR range-Doppler images are inherently 2-dimensional. Targets with a height offset lay over onto offset range and azimuth locations. Just which image locations are laid upon depends on the imaging geometry, including depression angle, squint angle, and target bearing. This is the well known layover phenomenon. Images formed with different aperture geometries will exhibit different layover characteristics. These differences can be exploited to ascertain target height information, in a stereoscopic manner. Depending on the imaging geometries, height accuracy can be on the order of horizontal position accuracies, thereby rivaling the best IFSAR capabilities in fine resolution SAR images. All that is required for this to work are two distinct passes with suitably different geometries from any plain old SAR. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619742/
3-D woven, mullite matrix, composite filter
Westinghouse, with Techniweave as a major subcontractor, is conducting a three-phase program aimed at providing advanced candle filters for a 1996 pilot scale demonstration in one of the two hot gas filter systems at Southern Company Service`s Wilsonville PSD Facility. The Base Program (Phases I and II) objective is to develop and demonstrate the suitability of the Westinghouse/Techniweave next generation composite candle filter for use in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and/or Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The Optional Task (Phase M, Task 5) objective is to fabricate, inspect and ship to Wilsonville Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful commercializaion of advanced coal-based power-generation systems such as Pressurized Fluidized-bed Combustion (PFBC), including second-generation PFBC, and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC). Current generation monolithic ceramic filters are subject to catastrophic failure because they have very low resistance to crack propagation. To overcome this problem, a damage-tolerant ceramic filter element is needed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623027/
3-dimensional wells and tunnels for finite element grids
Modeling fluid, vapor, and air injection and extraction from wells poses a number of problems. The length scale of well bores is centimeters, the region of high pressure gradient may be tens of meters and the reservoir may be tens of kilometers. Furthermore, accurate representation of the path of a deviated well can be difficult. Incorporating the physics of injection and extraction can be made easier and more accurate with automated grid generation tools that incorporate wells as part of a background mesh that represents the reservoir. GEOMESH is a modeling tool developed for automating finite element grid generation. This tool maintains the geometric integrity of the geologic framework and produces optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grids. GEOMESH creates a 3D well as hexagonal segments formed along the path of the well. This well structure is tetrahedralized into a Delaunay mesh and then embedded into a background mesh. The well structure can be radially or vertically refined and each well layer is assigned a material property or can take on the material properties of the surrounding stratigraphy. The resulting embedded well can then be used by unstructured finite element models for gas and fluid flow in the vicinity of wells or tunnels. This 3D well representation allows the study of the free- surface of the well and surrounding stratigraphy. It reduces possible grid orientation effects, and allows better correlation between well sample data and the geologic model. The well grids also allow improved visualization for well and tunnel model analysis. 3D observation of the grids helps qualitative interpretation and can reveal features not apparent in fewer dimensions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc668722/
3(omega) damage threshold evaluation of final optics components using Beamlet mule and off-line testing
A statistics-based model is being developed to predict the laser-damage-limited lifetime of UV optical components on the NIF laser. In order to provide data for the model, laser damage experiments were performed on the Beamlet laser system at LLNL. An early prototype NIF focus lens was exposed to twenty 35 1 nm pulses at an average fluence of 5 J/cm{sup 2}, 3ns. Using a high resolution optic inspection system a total of 353 damage sites was detected within the 1160 cm{sup 2} beam aperture. Through inspections of the lens before, after and, in some cases, during the campaign, pulse to pulse damage growth rates were measured for damage initiating both on the surface and at bulk inclusions. Growth rates as high as 79 {micro}m/pulse (surface diameter) were observed for damage initiating at pre-existing scratches in the surface. For most damage sites on the optic, both surface and bulk, the damage growth rate was approximately l0{micro}m/pulse. The lens was also used in Beamlet for a subsequent 1053 {micro}m/526 {micro}m campaign. The 352 {micro}m-initiated damage continued to grow during that campaign although at generally lower growth rate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc671790/
3 Questions pertaining to DARPA, Leased Space, and DISA
Department of Defense Clearinghouse Response: DoD Clearinghouse reply to a letter from the BRAC Commission regarding 3 Questions pertaining to DARPA, Leased Space, and DISA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc20441/
4.5 Meter high level waste canister study
The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Storage and Disposal Project has established the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IBLW) Storage Sub-Project to provide the capability to store Phase I and II BLW products generated by private vendors. A design/construction project, Project W-464, was established under the Sub-Project to provide the Phase I capability. Project W-464 will retrofit the Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB) to accommodate the Phase I I-ILW products. Project W-464 conceptual design is currently being performed to interim store 3.0 m-long BLW stainless steel canisters with a 0.61 in diameter, DOE is considering using a 4.5 in canister of the same diameter to reduce permanent disposal costs. This study was performed to assess the impact of replacing the 3.0 in canister with the 4.5 in canister. The summary cost and schedule impacts are described. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc682373/
04/28/05 Cobra Data: JSF Recommendation
103-06A-NMC19 - DoD Input - Navy/MC - Naval Air Station Pensacola - Florida - BRAC Commission - FY 2005. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc23607/
04/28/2005 COBRA Report: JSF Initial Test Site
DoD Input - 103-06 - General - Joint Strike Fighter Data - Cobra Report - BRAC Commission - FY 2005. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc23620/
The 5- by 7-meter wind tunnel of the DVL
The report contains a description of the DVL wind tunnel. According to the cones fixed, an elliptical stream with axes 5 by 7 meters and length 9 meters, or a stream 6 by 8 meters in cross section and 11 meters in length is available. The top speed with the smaller cone is 65 meters per second. The testing equipment consists of an automatic six-component balance and a test rig for propellers and engines up to 650 horsepower. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63426/
5-Volt and 4.6 V plateaus in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films
Additional plateaus with median voltages of {similar_to}4.6 V, and {similar_to}5 V have been observed on charging thin film lithium batteries with crystalline LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathodes to 5.3 V. Total charge extracted from the 4 V and the two additional plateaus corresponded to about 1Li/Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, but the distribution of capacity among the three plateaus varied from film to film. It is speculated that the additional plateaus result from formation of mixed spinel structures in which a fraction of the 8a sites areoccupied by Mn{sup 2+} or Mn{sup 4+} ions and a fraction of the Li{sup +} ions occupy the 16d sites. After charging to 5.3 V, the 4.6 V plateau disappeared, and the capacity of the 4 V plateau increased at the expense of that of the 5 V plateau. The latter change is attributed to movement of Mn{sup 3+} or Mn{sup 5+} ions from 8a to 16d sites. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc672866/
The 6-foot-4-inch wind tunnel at the Washington Navy Yard
The 6-foot-4-inch wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment has proven itself capable of continuous and reliable output of data. The real value of the tunnel will increase as experience is gained in checking the observed tunnel performance against full-scale performance. Such has been the case of the 8- by 8-foot tunnel, and for that reason the comparison in the calibration tests have been presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54183/
6 GeV light source project cost estimating procedure
To maintain uniformity in estimating the cost requirements of the various components of the 6 GeV Light Source, the following procedure will be used by all the task groups. The procedure uses a Work Breakdown Structure (VBS) to break down the project into manageable, easy to estimate, components. The project is first broken down into major tasks or categories. Then each major division is continuously subdivided until the desired level of detail is achieved. This can be shown best by using the example of the WBS of the Aladdin Upgrade Project, excerpts of which are included in Appendix A. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678465/
6 GeV synchrotron x-ray source: Conceptual design report. Supplement A - characteristics of the insertion devices for the 6 GeV synchrotron source
Historically, synchrotron radiation (SR) has been obtained primarily from bending-magnet (BM) sources. These continuous sources of electromagnetic radiation have contributed in a major way to our understanding of the structure and dynamics of biological, chemical and material systems. During the past few years, newer sources of SR based on sophisticated periodic magnetic structures, called insertion devices (IDs), have been developed. The electromagnetic radiation from these IDs can be used as a very versatile probe in scientific and technological research which is far superior to that based on a BM source. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc688582/
6 GeV synchrotron x-ray source: Conceptual design report. Supplement B - conceptual design of proposed beam lines for the 6 GeV light source
In this document, preliminary conceptual designs are presented for ten sample beamlines for the 6 GeV Light Source. These beamlines will accommodate investigations in solid-state physics, materials science, materials technology, chemical technology, and biological and medical sciences. In future, the designs will be altered to include new developments in x-ray optics and hardware technologies. The research areas addressed by the samples beamlines are as follows: Topography and Radiography/Tomography (section 2); Inelastic Scattering with Ultrahigh Energy Resolution (Section 3); Surface and Bulk Studies Using High Momentum Resolution (Section 4); Inelastic Scattering from Charge and Spin (Section 5); Advanced X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies (Section 6); Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies (Section 7); General Purpose Scattering for Materials Studies (Section 8); Multiple-Energy Anomalous-Dispersion Studies of Proteins (Section 9); Protein Crystallography (Section 10); Time- and Space-resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy (Section 11); Medical Diagnostic Facility (Section 12); and Transuranium Research Facility (Section 13). The computer systems to be used on the beamlines are also discussed in Section 14 of this document. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc683429/
The 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
This report presents a description of the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel and associated apparatus of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Included also are calibration test results and characteristic test data of both static force tests and autorotation tests made in the tunnel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66069/
7 questions to ask when you buy or sell shelled corn by grade.
An explanation of corn grade requirements. Factors include insects, odors, moisture, weight-per-bushel, cleanliness, damaged kernels, and color. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9181/
The "8(a) Program" for Small Businesses Owned and Controlled by the Socially and Economically Disadvantaged: Legal Requirements and Issues
This report provides a brief history of the 8(a) Program, summarizes key requirements, and discusses legal challenges alleging that the program's presumption that members of certain racial and ethnic groups are socially disadvantaged violates the constitutional guarantee of equal protection. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc227649/
8(a) Program: Fourteen Ineligible Firms Received $325 Million in Sole-Source and Set-Aside Contracts
A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Small Business Administration (SBA) helps socially and economically disadvantaged small businesses gain access to federal contracting opportunities through its 8(a) program. To participate, firms must be at least 51 percent owned and controlled by an individual who meets SBA's criteria of socially and economically disadvantaged. The firm must also qualify as a small business. Once certified, 8(a) firms are eligible to receive sole-source and set-aside contracts for up to 9 years. GAO was asked to (1) determine whether ineligible firms are participating in the 8(a) program, (2) proactively test SBA's controls over the 8(a) application process, and (3) determine what vulnerabilities, if any, exist in SBA's fraud prevention system. To identify cases, GAO reviewed SBA data and complaints to GAO's fraud hotline. To perform its proactive testing, GAO created four bogus businesses and applied for 8(a) certification. GAO did not attempt to project the extent of fraud and abuse in the program." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc297025/
8(a) Program: The Importance of Effective Fraud Prevention Controls
Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "This testimony discusses the results of our prior investigation of the Small Business Administration's (SBA) 8(a) Business Development Program. SBA's 8(a) program, named for a section of the Small Business Act, is a development program created to help small, disadvantaged businesses compete in the American economy and access the federal procurement market. To participate in the program, a firm must be certified as meeting several criteria, including: be a small business as defined by SBA; be unconditionally owned and controlled by one or more socially and economically disadvantaged individuals who are of good character and citizens of the United States; and show potential for success. Upon certification, firms can obtain federal contracts without competing fully and openly for the work. For example, agencies are permitted to enter into sole-source contracts after soliciting and negotiating with only one 8(a) company. They also can participate in restricted competitions for federal contracts, known as set-asides, open to only 8(a) companies. In March 2010, GAO issued two companion reports on the 8(a) program, one focused on internal control procedures and processes that SBA has implemented to ensure that only eligible firms participate in the program and one focused on fraud prevention. This testimony is based on the latter report, and addresses three issues: (1) whether ineligible firms were participating in the 8(a) program, (2) the results of our proactive testing of the application process, and (3) strengths and weaknesses in SBA's fraud prevention system." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc293759/
8. annual national conference of black physics students -- A summary report
The primary goals of the conference were to: (1) Develop a peer/mentor network within the African-American physics community; (2) Inform African-American students in physics of the various academic and professional opportunities; and (3) Bring important academic, economic and political issues and developments in the field to the attention of the students. The conference program was designed to fulfill these goals and optimize the students` exposure to physics as a professional and its real-life applications in both industry and academia. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc684859/
An 8-foot axisymmetrical fixed nozzle for subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.99 and for a supersonic Mach number of 1.2
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58368/
8 steps in grading soybeans : under revised standards, effective September 1, 1949.
An explanation of the process used by U.S. federal grain inspectors to grade soybeans. Factors include odor, weevil or garlic infestation, moisture, weight per bushel, foreign material, mixed colors, splits, and damage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9489/
9/11 Commission: Current Legislative Proposals for U.S. Immigration Law and Policy
This report briefly discusses some of the major immigration areas under consideration in comprehensive reform proposals suggested by the 9/11 Commission, including asylum, biometric tracking systems, border security, document security, exclusion, immigration enforcement, and visa issuances. It refers to other CRS reports that discuss these issues in depth and will be updated as needed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5952/
9/11 Commission: Current Legislative Proposals for U.S. Immigration Law and Policy
This report briefly discusses some of the major immigration areas under consideration in comprehensive reform proposals suggested by the 9/11 Commission, including asylum, biometric tracking systems, border security, document security, exclusion, immigration enforcement, and visa issuances. It refers to other CRS reports that discuss these issues in depth and will be updated as needed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7851/
9/11 Commission Recommendations: A Civil Liberties Oversight Board
Among the recommendations made by the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (9/11 Commission) in its final report is the creation of a board within the executive branch to oversee adherence to guidelines on, and the commitment to defend, civil liberties by the federal government. This report examines this recommendation and its implications, and will be updated as events warrant. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5755/
9/11 Commission Recommendations: Intelligence Budget
This report identifies the main recommendations of the 9/11 Commission with respect to the intelligence budget. This report also describes the intelligence budget process under current law to explain the effect of these recommendations and presents the current budget authorities of the Director of Central Intelligence, as well as budget provisions in two bills, S. 2774 and H.R. 5040, that include all Commission recommendations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5981/
9/11 Commission Recommendations: Joint Committee on Atomic Energy - A Model for Congressional Oversight?
This report focuses on that portion of the 9/11 Commission recommendation that urges Congress to consider the model of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy (JCAE). It provides an outline of the history, structure, and powers of the JCAE and analyzes a number of issues that might be considered by policymakers as they weigh the suitability of the JCAE as a possible model when crafting congressional oversight mechanisms for intelligence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5766/
9/11 Commission Recommendations: The Senate Confirmation Process for Presidential Nominees
On July 22, 2004, the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, known as the 9/11 Commission, issued its final report, detailing the events up to and including the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission recommended that the Senate adopt rules requiring hearings and votes to confirm or reject national security nominees within 30 days of their submission at the start of each new presidential administration. Implementing the commission's proposal would involve imposing new restrictions on both the power of committee chairs to control the agenda of their committees and the rights of Senators to delay or block nominations through holds and extended debate. This report discusses in detail this proposal, how it could be implemented, and the potential effects of its implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10108/
9/11 Commission Recommendations: The Senate Confirmation Process for Presidential Nominees
On July 22, 2004, the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, known as the 9/11 Commission, issued its final report, detailing the events up to and including the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission recommended that the Senate adopt rules requiring hearings and votes to confirm or reject national security nominees within 30 days of their submission at the start of each new presidential administration. Implementing the commission's proposal would involve imposing new restrictions on both the power of committee chairs to control the agenda of their committees and the rights of Senators to delay or block nominations through holds and extended debate. This report discusses in detail this proposal, how it could be implemented, and the potential effects of its implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7850/
The 9/11 Commission Report: Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States
The official Government edition of the Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (also known as the 9-11 Commission, an independent, bipartisan commission created by congressional legislation and the signature of President George W. Bush in late 2002), provides a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response to the attacks. Provides recommendations designed to guard against future attacks. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc123526/
9/11 Commission Report: Reorganization, Transformation, and Information Sharing
Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The sorrow, loss, anger, and resolve so evident immediately following the September 11, 2001, attacks have been combined in an effort to help assure that our country will never again be caught unprepared. As the 9/11 Commission notes, we are safer today but we are not safe, and much work remains. Although in today's world we can never be 100 percent secure, and we can never do everything everywhere, we concur with the Commission's conclusion that the American people should expect their government to do its very best. GAO's mission is to help the Congress improve the performance and ensure the accountability of the federal government for the benefit of the American people. GAO has been actively involved in improving government's performance in the critically important homeland security area both before and after the September 11 attacks. In its request, the House Committee on Government Reform have asked GAO to address two issues: the lack of effective information sharing and analysis and the need for executive branch reorganization in response to the 9/11 Commission recommendations. Further, the Committee has asked GAO to address how to remedy problems in information sharing and analysis by transforming the intelligence community from a system of "need to know" to one of a "need to share."" digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc295217/
9/11 Terrorism: Global Economic Costs
The 9/11 attacks were part of Al Qaeda’s strategy to disrupt Western economies and impose both direct and secondary costs on the United States and other nations. The immediate costs were the physical damage, loss of lives and earnings, slower world economic growth, and capital losses on stock markets. Indirect costs include higher insurance and shipping fees, diversion of time and resources away from enhancing productivity to protecting and insuring property, public loss of confidence, and reduced demand for travel and tourism. In a broader sense, the 9/11 attacks led to the invasions and occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq (and the Global War on Terrorism) and perhaps emboldened terrorists to attack in Bali, Spain, Morocco, and Saudi Arabia. A policy question for Congress is how to evaluate the costs and benefits of further spending to counter terrorism and its economic impact. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7725/
9. international mouse genome conference
This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc687281/
A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a muon-muon collider
The performance parameters of a proton source which produces the required flux of muons for a 2-TeV on 2-TeV muon collider are: a beam energy of 10 GeV, a repetition rate of 30 Hz, two bunches per pulse with 5 x 10{sup 13} protons per bunch, and an rms bunch length of 3 nsec (1). Aside from the bunch length requirement, these parameters are identical to those of a 5-MW proton source for a spallation neutron source based on a 10-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) (2). The 10-GeV synchrotron uses a 2-GeV accelerator system as its injector, and the 2-GeV RCS is an extension of a feasibility study for a I-MW spallation source described elsewhere (3--9). A study for the 5-MW spallation source was performed for ANL site-specific geometrical requirements. Details are presented for a site-independent proton source suitable for the muon collider utilizing the results of the 5-MW spallation source study. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc669513/
A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a pulsed spallation source
A feasibility study for a pulsed spallation source based on a 5-MW, 10-GeV rapid proton synchrotron (RCS) is in progress. The integrated concept and performance parameters of the facility are discussed. The 10-GeV synchrotron uses as its injector the 2-GeV accelerator system of a 1-MW source described elsewhere. The 1-MW source accelerator system consists of a 400-MeV H{sup {minus}} linac with 2.5 MeV energy spread in the 75% chopped (25% removed) beam and a 30-Hz RCS that accelerates the 400-MeV beam to 2 GeV. The time averaged current of the accelerator system is 0.5 mA, equivalent to 1.04 {times} 10{sup 14} protons per pulse. The 10-GeV RCS accepts the 2 GeV beam and accelerates it to 10 GeV. Beam transfer from the 2-GeV synchrotron to the 10-GeV machine u highly efficient bunch-to-bucket injection, so that the transfer can be made without beam loss. The synchrotron lattice uses FODO cells of 90{degrees} phase advance. Dispersion-free straight sections are obtained using a missing magnet scheme. The synchrotron magnets are powered by dual-frequency resonant circuits. The magnets are excited at a 20-Hz rate and de-excited at 60-Hz. resulting in an effective 30-Hz rate. A key feature of the design of this accelerator system is that beam losses are minimized from injection to extraction, reducing activation to levels consistent with hands-on maintenance. Details of the study are presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc667953/
10-MW demonstration of the gas suspension absorption process at TVA`s Center for Emissions Research. Final report
The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in cooperation with AirPol Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed a successful 17-month test program with the AirPol Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process at TVA`s Center for Emissions Research (CER). This project was selected by DOE for funding in the third round of the Clean Coal Technology Program. This 10-MW demonstration of the GSA FGD system at the CER was the first application of this technology in the U.S. The GSA test program, which was cofunded two-thirds by TVA and one-third by DOE/AirPol, was completed over a 17-month period from November 1, 1992 to March 31, 1993. This test program demonstrated that the GSA FGD technology could achieve high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (90+ percent) for a 2.7 percent sulfur (as-fired) coal application, while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), i.e., 0.03 lb/MBtu, in a four-field electrostatic precipitator. The reliability and operability of this system was also demonstrated in a 28-day, 24 hour/day, continuous run during which the GSA unit simultaneously achieved high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (90+ percent) and maintained particulate emissions below the NSPS. Also, the air toxics removal capabilities of the GSA system were determined in a series of tests. A 1-MW pulsejet baghouse (PJBH) pilot plant was also tested in conjunction with this GSA test program. This PJBH testing was initially cofunded by TVA and the Electric Power Research Institute, who were later joined by AirPol and DOE in sponsoring this PJBH testing. A 14-day PJBH demonstration run was also completed to confirm the reliability of this system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc621760/
13 point video tape quality guidelines
Until high definition television (ATV) arrives, in the U.S. we must still contend with the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) video standard (or PAL or SECAM-depending on your country). NTSC, a 40-year old standard designed for transmission of color video camera images over a small bandwidth, is not well suited for the sharp, full-color images that todays computers are capable of producing. PAL and SECAM also suffers from many of NTSC`s problems, but to varying degrees. Video professionals, when working with computer graphic (CG) images, use two monitors: a computer monitor for producing CGs and an NTSC monitor to view how a CG will look on video. More often than not, the NTSC image will differ significantly from the CG image, and outputting it to NTSC as an artist works enables the him or her to see the images as others will see it. Below are thirteen guidelines designed to increase the quality of computer graphics recorded onto video tape. Viewing your work in NTSC and attempting to follow the below tips will enable you to create higher quality videos. No video is perfect, so don`t expect to abide by every guideline every time. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc683025/
THE 15 LAYER SILICON DRIFT DETECTOR TRACKER IN EXPERIMENT 896.
Large linear silicon drift detectors have been developed and are in production for use in several experiments. Recently 15 detectors were used as a tracking device in BNL-AGS heavy ion experiment (E896). The detectors were successfully operated in a 6.2 T magnetic field. The behavior of the detectors, such as drift uniformity, resolution, and charge collection efficiency are presented. The effect of the environment on the detector performance is discussed. Some results from the experimental run are presented. The detectors performed well in an experimental environment. This is the first tracking application of these detectors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc620289/
15 letters from individuals expressing their concern about the China Lake Recommendation
Community Correspondence - 15 letters from individuals expressing their concern about the China Lake Recommendation digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc20880/
16 Individual Letters from citizens urging the Commission to reconsider the recommendatio to re-align work from NSWC Crane
Community Correspondence - 16 Individual Letters from citizens urging the Commission to reconsider the recommendatio to re-align work from NSWC Crane digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc21241/
16 letters from citizens concerened about the realignment of Yeager Air Guard Base
Community Correspondence - 16 letters from citizens concerened about the realignment of Yeager Air Guard Base digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc20884/
20 Letters from citizens regarding the BRAC's very negative effect on the Air National Guard
Community Correspondence - 20 Letters from citizens regarding the BRAC's very negative effect on the Air National Guard. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc20518/
20 Letters from concerned citizens in response to the recommendation regarding Wright Patterson Air Force Base
Community Correspondence - 20 Letters from concerned citizens in response to the recommendation regarding Wright Patterson Air Force Base digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc19086/
20-MM aircraft gun matériel M1 and M2.
"In addition to a description of the 20-mm aircraft gun matériel M1 and M2, this manual contains technical information required for the identification, use, and care of the matériel." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29989/
A 20 - Red River Army Depot, TX, Community Presentation
Red River Army Depot, Texas, local community presentation of 21 June 05 digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc24485/
21 Jun 05 Memo from DoD Transmitting Draft Copies of DoD Strategy for Homeland Defense & Civil Support to Commission
Memo from Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Installations and Environment) Phil Grone to Frank Cirillo (Director, Review and Analysis) Transmitting Draft Copies of DoD Strategy for Homeland Defense & Civil Support to Commission digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc16129/
25 Letters from concerned citizens regarding Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve and Guard Base
Community Correspondence - 25 Letters from concerned citizens regarding Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve and Guard Base digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc19185/
26 job opportunities in the United States Army Air Forces.
Folded brochure containing panels which can be folded out and used as posters. One side has photographs depicting 26 Army Air Force jobs. Another side has photographs of different types of military airplanes and depicts the jobs associated with flying and maintaining a B-17 airplane. On the reverse side are job descriptions and requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc140/