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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1920-1929
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Stability of airplanes

Stability of airplanes

Date: May 1, 1922
Creator: Warner, Edward P
Description: The author attempts to correct the misconception that piloting an airplane requires extraordinary skill and balance. He also tries to show that airplanes are extremely stable in flight. Some of the major points covered in this article include: automatic pilots, airplanes designed to be stable, and the reliance on mathematics to help in designing stable aircraft.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Stability of the parachute and helicopter

Stability of the parachute and helicopter

Date: January 1, 1920
Creator: Batemen, H
Description: This report deals with an extension of the theory of stability in oscillation to the case of aircraft following a vertical trajectory, and particularly to the oscillations of parachutes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Stall-proof airplanes

Stall-proof airplanes

Date: January 1, 1927
Creator: Lachmann, G
Description: My lecture has to do with the following questions. Is the danger of stalling necessarily inherent in the airplane in its present form and structure, or can it be diminished or eliminated by suitable means? Do we possess such means or devices and how must they operate? In this connection I will devote special attention to the exhibition of stall-proof airplanes by Fokker under the auspices of the English Air Ministry, which took place in Croyden last April.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Standard atmosphere

Standard atmosphere

Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Gregg, Willis Ray
Description: This report was prepared at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and discusses the need of a standard set of values of pressure, temperature and density at various altitudes and points out the desirability of adopting such values as are most in accord with actual average conditions, in order that corrections in individual cases may be as small as possible. To meet this need, so far as the united states is concerned, all free-air observations obtained by means of kites and balloons at several stations in this country near latitude 40 degrees N., have been used, and average values of pressure, temperature, and density, based upon those observations, have been determined for summer, winter, and the year, and for all altitudes up to 20,000 meters (65,000 feet). These values are presented in tables and graphs in both metric and english units; and in the tables of densities there are also included values of density for other parts of the world, more particularly for Europe. A comparison with these values shows that, except in the lowest levels, the agreement is very satisfactory.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Standard atmosphere - tables and data

Standard atmosphere - tables and data

Date: January 1, 1926
Creator: Diehl, Walter S
Description: Detailed tables of pressures and densities are given for altitudes up to 20,000 meters and to 65,000 feet. In addition to the tables the various data pertaining to the standard atmosphere have been compiled in convenient form for ready reference. This report is an extension of NACA-TR-147.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Standardization and aerodynamics

Standardization and aerodynamics

Date: March 1, 1923
Creator: Knight, William; Prandtl, L; VON KARMAN; Costanzi, G; Margoulis, W; Verduzio, R et al.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Standardization tests of NACA no. 1 wind tunnel

Standardization tests of NACA no. 1 wind tunnel

Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Description: The tests described in this report were made in the 5-foot atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, at Langley Field. The primary objective of collecting data on the characteristics of this tunnel for comparison with those of others throughout the world, in order that, in the future, the results of tests made in all the principle laboratories may be interpreted, compared, and coordinated on a basis of scientifically established relationships, a process hitherto impossible due to the lack of comparable data. The work includes tests of a disk, spheres, cylinders, and airfoils, explorations of the test section for static pressure and velocity distribution, and determination of the variations of air flow direction throughout the operating range of the tunnel. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Static soaring flight over flat sea coasts

Static soaring flight over flat sea coasts

Date: November 1, 1923
Creator: Georgii, W
Description: Static soaring flight has hitherto been accomplished by means of two sources of energy: ascending air currents in the vicinity of obstacles and those produced by unequal heating. The latter has not yet been practically tested in soaring flight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Static stability of seaplane floats and hulls

Static stability of seaplane floats and hulls

Date: March 1, 1924
Creator: Diehl, W S
Description: Values of lateral and longitudinal metacentric heights for various seaplanes were calculated by means of approximate formulae derived here. The data are given in tabular form. Upon plotting these metacentric heights against the corresponding gross weights, it appears that the metacentric height is approximately a straight line function of the gross weight. For the lateral metacentric height GM = 13 + .002 W and for longitudinal metacentric height GM = 15 + .002 W, GM is in feet and the gross weight (W) is in pounds. Although only approximate, it is thought that the values indicated here are a reliable guide to current practice. It is recommended that the longitudinal and lateral metacentric heights be made equal and of the value given by GM = 15 = .002 W. The proper length or spacing required to satisfy the indicated value may then be obtained from substitution in the approximate formulae for metacentric height.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Static testing and proposed standard specifications

Static testing and proposed standard specifications

Date: July 1, 1920
Creator: Warner, E P
Description: Static tests fall into two groups, the first of which is designed to load all members of the structure approximately in accordance with the worst loads which they carry in flight, while the second is directed to the testing of specific members which are suspected of weakness and which are difficult to analyze mathematically. The nature of the loading in the second type is different for every different test, but the purpose of the first is defined clearly enough to permit the adoption of some standard set of loading specifications, at least for airplanes of normal design. Here, an attempt is made to carry through an analysis leading to such a standard, the goal being the determination of a load which will simultaneously impose on every member of the airplane structure a stress equal to the worst it will carry in flight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department