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3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization DE FG02 96ER 14714

3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization DE FG02 96ER 14714

Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: Morgan, F. Dale; Rodi, William & Lesmes, David
Description: The Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL) performed a broad foundational study of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for site characterization. The project encompassed laboratory studies of microgeometry and chemistry effects on Induced Polarization (IP), an investigation of electromagnetic coupling (emc) noise, and development of 3D modeling and inversion codes. The major finding of the project is that emc noise presents a critical limitation for field implementation of SIP and conventional correction methods are inadequate. The project developed a frequency domain 3D complex resistivity modeling and inversion code Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effects of solution chemistry and microgeometry on the SIP response of sandstone. Results indicate that changes in chemistry affect the magnitude of the spectral IP response and changes in microgeometry affect the shape of the spectral IP response. The developed physiochemical IP model can be used to invert spectral IP data for an apparent grain size distribution. Laboratory studies over the last twenty years have shown that SIP data must be acquired over several decades of frequency and include frequencies greater than 1kHz. A model of the components of emc noise has been developed and investigation with this model showed that inductive coupling is the most significant component. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization of Contaminant Plumes

3-D Spectral IP Imaging: Non-Invasive Characterization of Contaminant Plumes

Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Morgan, F. Dale; Rodi, William & Lesmes, David
Description: The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth's subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are: (1) Understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations. (2) Developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field. (3) Developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. 1998 annual progress report

3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. 1998 annual progress report

Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Morgan, F. D.; Rodi, W. & Lesmes, D.
Description: 'The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are: (1) understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations; (2) developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field; (3) developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties. The authors laboratory experiments to date are described in Appendices A and B, which consist of two papers submitted to the annual SAGEEP conference (Frye et al., 1998; Sturrock et al., 1998). The experiments involved measurements of complex resistivity vs. frequency on a suite of brine saturated sandstone samples. In one set of experiments, the fluid chemistry (pH, ionic strength, and cation type) was varied. In a second set of experiments, the microgeometry of the rock matrix was varied. The experiments showed that spectral IP responses ...
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3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Frye, K.M.; Lesmes, D.P.; Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W.; Shi, W. & Sturrock, J.
Description: 'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. The first-year accomplishments are (1) laboratory experiments on fluid-saturated sandstones quantifying the dependence of spectral IP responses on solution chemistry and rock micro-geometry; (2) library research on the current understanding of electromagnetic coupling effects on IP data acquired in the field: and (3) development of prototype forward modeling and inversion algorithms for interpreting IP data in terms of 3-D models of complex resistivity.'
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3-D surface profile measurements of large x-ray synchrotron radiation mirrors using stitching interferometry.

3-D surface profile measurements of large x-ray synchrotron radiation mirrors using stitching interferometry.

Date: September 12, 2002
Creator: Assoufid, L.; Bray, M.; Qian, J. & Shu, D.
Description: Stitching interferometry, using small-aperture, high-resolution, phase-measuring interferometry, has been proposed for quite some time now as a metrology technique to obtain 3-dimensional profiles of surfaces of oversized optical components and substrates. The aim of this work is to apply this method to the specific case of long grazing-incidence x-ray mirrors, such as those used in beamlines at synchrotron radiation facilities around the world. Both fabrication and characterization of these mirrors would greatly benefit from this technique because it offers the potential for providing measurements with accuracy and resolution better than those obtained using existing noncontact laser profilers, such as the long trace profiler (LTP). Measurement data can be used as feedback for computer-controlled fabrication processes to correct for possible topography errors. The data can also be used for simulating and predicting mirror performance under realistic conditions. A semiautomated stitching system was built and tested at the X-ray Optics Metrology Laboratory of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial objective was to achieve a measurement sensitivity on the order of 1 {micro}rad rms. Preliminary tests on a 1 m-long x-ray mirror showed system repeatability of less than 0.6 {micro}rad rms. This value is comparable to that of a ...
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3-D Target Location from Stereoscopic SAR Images

3-D Target Location from Stereoscopic SAR Images

Date: October 1, 1999
Creator: Doerry, Armin W.
Description: SAR range-Doppler images are inherently 2-dimensional. Targets with a height offset lay over onto offset range and azimuth locations. Just which image locations are laid upon depends on the imaging geometry, including depression angle, squint angle, and target bearing. This is the well known layover phenomenon. Images formed with different aperture geometries will exhibit different layover characteristics. These differences can be exploited to ascertain target height information, in a stereoscopic manner. Depending on the imaging geometries, height accuracy can be on the order of horizontal position accuracies, thereby rivaling the best IFSAR capabilities in fine resolution SAR images. All that is required for this to work are two distinct passes with suitably different geometries from any plain old SAR.
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3-D THERMAL EVALUATIONS FOR a FUELED EXPERIMENT in the ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

3-D THERMAL EVALUATIONS FOR a FUELED EXPERIMENT in the ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

Date: October 6, 2004
Creator: Ambrosek, R. G.; Chang, G. S. & Utterbeck, D. J.
Description: The DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Generation IV reactor programs are developing new fuel types for use in the current Light Water Reactors and future advanced reactor concepts. The Advanced Gas Reactor program is planning to test fuel to be used in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) nuclear reactor. Preliminary information for assessing performance of the fuel will be obtained from irradiations performed in the Advanced Test Reactor large ''B'' experimental facility. A test configuration has been identified for demonstrating fuel types typical of gas cooled reactors or fast reactors that may play a role in closing the fuel cycle or increasing efficiency via high temperature operation Plans are to have 6 capsules, each containing 12 compacts, for the test configuration. Each capsule will have its own temperature control system. Passing a helium-neon gas through the void regions between the fuel compacts and the graphite carrier and between the graphite carrier and the capsule wall will control temperature. This design with three compacts per axial level was evaluated for thermal performance to ascertain the temperature distributions in the capsule and test specimens with heating rates that encompass the range of initial heat generation rates.
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3-D UNSTRUCTURED HEXAHEDRAL-MESH Sn TRANSPORT METHODS

3-D UNSTRUCTURED HEXAHEDRAL-MESH Sn TRANSPORT METHODS

Date: November 1, 2000
Creator: MOREL, J.; MCGHEE, J. & AL, ET
Description: This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a method for solving the neutral-particle transport equation on 3-D unstructured hexahedral meshes using a S{sub n} discretization in angle in conjunction with a discontinuous finite-element discretization in space and a multigroup discretization in energy. Previous methods for solving this equation in 3-D have been limited to rectangular meshes. The unstructured-mesh method that we have developed is far more efficient for solving problems with complex 3-D geometric features than rectangular-mesh methods. In spite of having to make several compromises in our spatial discretization technique and our iterative solution technique, our method has been found to be both accurate and efficient for a broad class of problems.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D vertical seismic profiling at LLNL Site 300

3-D vertical seismic profiling at LLNL Site 300

Date: January 29, 1997
Creator: Bainer, R.; Rector, J. & Milligan, P.
Description: The initial goal of the 3-D Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) work at LLNL was to characterize seismic wave velocities and frequencies below the vadose zone to design the acquisition geometry for a 3-D shallow surface seismic reflection survey. VSPs are also used routinely to provide a link between surface seismic data and well logs. However, a test 2-D seismic line recorded at LLNL in the Spring of 1994 indicated that obtaining high quality reflection images below the vadose zone, yet shallower that 50 m, would require an expensive, very finely sampled survey ({lt} 1 m receiver spacing). Extensive image processing of the LLNL 2-D test line indicated that the only reliable reflection was from the top of the water table. Surprisingly, these results were very different than recent 3-D seismic work recorded at other sites, where high quality, high frequency surface (up to 300 Hz) reflection images were obtained as shallow as 20m. We believe that the differences are primarily due to the comparatively deep vadose zone at LLNL (15 to 30m) as compared to 0-5m at other sites. The thick vadose zone attenuates the reflection signals, particularly at the high frequencies (above 100 @). In addition, the vadose zone ...
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A 3-D Vortex Code for Parachute Flow Predictions: VIPAR Version 1.0

A 3-D Vortex Code for Parachute Flow Predictions: VIPAR Version 1.0

Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: Strickland, James H.; Homicz, Gregory F.; Porter, Vicki L. & Gossler, Albert A.
Description: This report describes a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the VIPAR code (Vortex Inflation PARachute code) is described herein. This version contains several first order algorithms that we are in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator that can be used to produce a large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an ExodusII database file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two ExodusII files that can be post processed and viewed using software such as EnSight{trademark}.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-D woven, mullite matrix, composite filter

3-D woven, mullite matrix, composite filter

Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Lane, J.E.; Painter, C.J. & Radford, K.C. LeCostaouec, J.F.
Description: Westinghouse, with Techniweave as a major subcontractor, is conducting a three-phase program aimed at providing advanced candle filters for a 1996 pilot scale demonstration in one of the two hot gas filter systems at Southern Company Service`s Wilsonville PSD Facility. The Base Program (Phases I and II) objective is to develop and demonstrate the suitability of the Westinghouse/Techniweave next generation composite candle filter for use in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and/or Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The Optional Task (Phase M, Task 5) objective is to fabricate, inspect and ship to Wilsonville Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful commercializaion of advanced coal-based power-generation systems such as Pressurized Fluidized-bed Combustion (PFBC), including second-generation PFBC, and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC). Current generation monolithic ceramic filters are subject to catastrophic failure because they have very low resistance to crack propagation. To overcome this problem, a damage-tolerant ceramic filter element is needed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A 3-Dimensional discrete fracture network generator to examine fracture-matrix interaction using TOUGH2

A 3-Dimensional discrete fracture network generator to examine fracture-matrix interaction using TOUGH2

Date: April 9, 2003
Creator: Ito, Kazumasa & Yongkoo, Seol
Description: Water fluxes in unsaturated, fractured rock involve the physical processes occurring at fracture-matrix interfaces within fracture networks. Modeling these water fluxes using a discrete fracture network model is a complicated effort. Existing preprocessors for TOUGH2 are not suitable to generate grids for fracture networks with various orientations and inclinations. There are several 3-D discrete-fracture-network simulators for flow and transport, but most of them do not capture fracture-matrix interaction. We have developed a new 3-D discrete-fracture-network mesh generator, FRACMESH, to provide TOUGH2 with information about the fracture network configuration and fracture-matrix interactions. FRACMESH transforms a discrete fracture network into a 3 dimensional uniform mesh, in which fractures are considered as elements with unique rock material properties and connected to surrounding matrix elements. Using FRACMESH, individual fractures may have uniform or random aperture distributions to consider heterogeneity. Fracture element volumes and interfacial areas are calculated from fracture geometry within individual elements. By using FRACMESH and TOUGH2, fractures with various inclinations and orientations, and fracture-matrix interaction, can be incorporated. In this paper, results of flow and transport simulations in a fractured rock block utilizing FRACMESH are presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-Dimensional Flow Modeling of a Proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Ion-Exchange Column Design

3-Dimensional Flow Modeling of a Proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Ion-Exchange Column Design

Date: November 2002
Creator: Aleman, Sebastian
Description: Historically, it has been assumed that the inlet and outlet low activity waste plenums would be designed such that a nearly uniform velocity profile would be maintained at every axial cross-section (i.e., providing nearly 100 percent use of the resin bed). With this proposed design, we see a LAW outlet distributor that results in significant non-axial velocity gradients in the bottom regions of the bed with the potential to reduce the effectiveness'' of the overall resin bed. The magnitude of this efficiency reduction depends upon how far up-gradient of the LAW outlet these non-axial velocities persist and to what extent a ''dead-zone'' is established beneath the LAW outlet. This can impact loading and elution performance of the ion-exchange facility. Currently, no experimental studies are planned. The primary objective of this work was, through modeling, to assess the fluid dynamic impact on ''effective'' resin volume of the full-scale column based on its normal operation using a recently proposed LAW outlet distributor. The analysis effort was limited to 3-D flow only analyses (i.e., no follow on transport analyses) with 3-D particle tracking to approximate the impact that a nonaxial velocity profile would have on bed ''effectiveness''. Additional analyses were performed to estimate ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A 3-dimensional ray-trace model for predicting the performance of flashlamp-pumped laser amplifiers

A 3-dimensional ray-trace model for predicting the performance of flashlamp-pumped laser amplifiers

Date: February 13, 1997
Creator: Jancaitis, K.S.; Haney, S.W.; Munro, D.H.; Le Touze, G. & Cabourdin, O.
Description: We have developed a fully three-dimensional model for the performance of flashlamp pumped laser amplifiers. The model uses a reverse ray-trace technique to calculate the pumping of the laser glass by the flashlamp radiation. We have discovered several different methods by which we can speed up the calculation of the gain profile in a amplifier. The model predicts the energy-storage performance of the Beamlet amplifiers to better than 5%. This model will be used in the optimization of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) amplifier design.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3-dimensional wells and tunnels for finite element grids

3-dimensional wells and tunnels for finite element grids

Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Cherry, T.A.; Gable, C.W. & Trease, H.
Description: Modeling fluid, vapor, and air injection and extraction from wells poses a number of problems. The length scale of well bores is centimeters, the region of high pressure gradient may be tens of meters and the reservoir may be tens of kilometers. Furthermore, accurate representation of the path of a deviated well can be difficult. Incorporating the physics of injection and extraction can be made easier and more accurate with automated grid generation tools that incorporate wells as part of a background mesh that represents the reservoir. GEOMESH is a modeling tool developed for automating finite element grid generation. This tool maintains the geometric integrity of the geologic framework and produces optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grids. GEOMESH creates a 3D well as hexagonal segments formed along the path of the well. This well structure is tetrahedralized into a Delaunay mesh and then embedded into a background mesh. The well structure can be radially or vertically refined and each well layer is assigned a material property or can take on the material properties of the surrounding stratigraphy. The resulting embedded well can then be used by unstructured finite element models for gas and fluid flow in the vicinity of wells or tunnels. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A 3% Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Qweak Setup

A 3% Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Qweak Setup

Date: August 1, 2013
Creator: Waidyawansa, Dinayadura Buddhini
Description: The beam normal single spin asymmetry generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nucleons is an observable of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange process. Moreover, it is a potential source of false asymmetry in parity violating electron scattering experiments. The Q{sub weak} experiment uses parity violating electron scattering to make a direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton. The targeted 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton probes for parity violating new physics beyond the Standard Model. The beam normal single spin asymmetry at Q{sub weak} kinematics is at least three orders of magnitude larger than 5 ppb precision of the parity violating asymmetry. To better understand this parity conserving background, the Q{sub weak} Collaboration has performed elastic scattering measurements with fully transversely polarized electron beam on the proton and aluminum. This dissertation presents the analysis of the 3% measurement (1.3% statistical and 2.6% systematic) of beam normal single spin asymmetry in electronproton scattering at a Q2 of 0.025 (GeV/c)2. It is the most precise existing measurement of beam normal single spin asymmetry available at the time. A measurement of this precision helps to improve the theoretical models on beam normal ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3 MW, 110 GHz ECH system for the DIII-D tokamak

3 MW, 110 GHz ECH system for the DIII-D tokamak

Date: July 1998
Creator: Callis, R. W.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.; Harris, T. E.; O`Neill, R. C.; Remsen, D.B. et al.
Description: To support the Advanced Tokamak (AT) operating regimes in the DIII-D tokamak, methods need to be developed to control the current and pressure profiles across the plasma discharge. In particular, AT plasmas require substantial off-axis current in contrast to normal tokamak discharges where the current peaks on-axis. An effort is under way to use Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) as a method of sustaining the off-axis current in AT plasmas. The first step in this campaign is the installation of three megawatts of electron cyclotron heating power. This involves the installation of three rf systems operating at 110 GHz, the second harmonic resonance frequency on DIII-D, with each system generating nominally 1 MW. The three systems will use one GYCOM (Russian) gyrotron and two CPI (formerly Varian) gyrotrons, all with windowless evacuated corrugated low loss transmission lines. The first two of three 1 MW ECH systems is operating routinely at DIII-D with injected power at 110 GHz of approximately 1.5 MW with good power accountability. Transport experiments using modulated ECH have been performed confirming the power deposition location. On-axis and off-axis current drive experiments have been successfully performed with on-axis ECCD currents of 170 kA being observed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3(omega) damage threshold evaluation of final optics components using Beamlet mule and off-line testing

3(omega) damage threshold evaluation of final optics components using Beamlet mule and off-line testing

Date: July 27, 1998
Creator: Kozlowski, M. F.; Maricle, S.; Mouser, R.; Schwartz, S.; Wegner, P. & Weiland, T.
Description: A statistics-based model is being developed to predict the laser-damage-limited lifetime of UV optical components on the NIF laser. In order to provide data for the model, laser damage experiments were performed on the Beamlet laser system at LLNL. An early prototype NIF focus lens was exposed to twenty 35 1 nm pulses at an average fluence of 5 J/cm{sup 2}, 3ns. Using a high resolution optic inspection system a total of 353 damage sites was detected within the 1160 cm{sup 2} beam aperture. Through inspections of the lens before, after and, in some cases, during the campaign, pulse to pulse damage growth rates were measured for damage initiating both on the surface and at bulk inclusions. Growth rates as high as 79 {micro}m/pulse (surface diameter) were observed for damage initiating at pre-existing scratches in the surface. For most damage sites on the optic, both surface and bulk, the damage growth rate was approximately l0{micro}m/pulse. The lens was also used in Beamlet for a subsequent 1053 {micro}m/526 {micro}m campaign. The 352 {micro}m-initiated damage continued to grow during that campaign although at generally lower growth rate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
3 Questions pertaining to DARPA, Leased Space, and DISA

3 Questions pertaining to DARPA, Leased Space, and DISA

Date: August 11, 2005
Creator: United States. Dept. of Defense.
Description: Department of Defense Clearinghouse Response: DoD Clearinghouse reply to a letter from the BRAC Commission regarding 3 Questions pertaining to DARPA, Leased Space, and DISA.
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A 3 TeV Muon Collider Lattice Design

A 3 TeV Muon Collider Lattice Design

Date: May 1, 2012
Creator: Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E. & /Fermilab
Description: A new lattice for 3 TeV c.o.m. energy with {beta}* = 5mm was developed which follows the basic concept of the earlier 1.5 TeV design but uses quad triplets for the final focus in order to keep the maximum magnet strength and aperture close to those in 1.5 TeV case. Another difference is employment of combined-function magnets with the goal to lower heat deposition in magnet cold mass and to eliminate bending field free regions which produce 'hot spots' of neutrino radiation that can be an issue at higher energy. The proposed lattice is shown to satisfy the requirements on luminosity, dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.
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3 V manganese oxide electrode materials for lithium batteries.

3 V manganese oxide electrode materials for lithium batteries.

Date: June 20, 2000
Creator: Johnson, C. S. & Thackeray, M. M.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A 3-year plan for beam science in the heavy-ion fusion virtual national laboratory

A 3-year plan for beam science in the heavy-ion fusion virtual national laboratory

Date: September 10, 2001
Creator: Logan, B. Grant
Description: In December 1998, LBNL Director Charles Shank and LLNL Director Bruce Tarter signed a Memorandum of Agreement to create the Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) with the purpose of improving the efficiency and productivity of heavy ion research through coordination of the two laboratories' efforts under one technical director. In 1999, PPPL Director Robert Goldston signed the VNL MOA for PPPL's heavy-ion fusion group to join the VNL. LBNL and LLNL each contribute about 45% of the $10.6 M/yr trilab VNL effort, and PPPL contributes currently about 10% of the VNL effort. The three labs carry out collaborative experiments, theory and simulations of a variety of intense beam scientific issues described below. The tri-lab HIF VNL program is part of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) fusion program. A short description of the four major tasks areas of HIF-VNL research is given in the next section. The task areas are: High Current Experiment, Final Focus/Chamber Transport, Source/Injector/Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), and Theory/Simulation. As a result of the internal review, more detailed reviews of the designs, costs and schedules for some of the tasks have been completed, which will provide more precision in the scheduled completion dates ...
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A 4.2 GS/S Synchronized Vertical Excitation System for SPS Studies - Steps Toward Wideband Feedback

A 4.2 GS/S Synchronized Vertical Excitation System for SPS Studies - Steps Toward Wideband Feedback

Date: October 18, 2013
Creator: Fox, J.D.; Olsen, J.; Rivetta, C.; Rivetta, I.; Turgut, O.; Uemura, S. et al.
Description: Abstract Not Provided
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A 4.2 GS/sec. Synchronized Vertical Excitation System for SPS Studies - Steps Toward Wideband Feedback

A 4.2 GS/sec. Synchronized Vertical Excitation System for SPS Studies - Steps Toward Wideband Feedback

Date: July 10, 2012
Creator: Fox, John
Description: A 4.2 GS/sec. beam excitation system with accelerator synchronization and power stages is described. The system is capable of playing unique samples (32 samples/bunch) for 15,000 turns on selected bunch(es) in the SPS in syn- chronism with the injection and acceleration cycle. The purpose of the system is to excite internal modes of single-bunch vertical motion, and study the bunch dynamics in the presence of developing Electron cloud or TMCI effects. The system includes a synchronized master oscillator, SPS timing functions, an FPGA based arbitrary waveform generator, 4.2 GS/sec. D/A system and four 80W 20-1000 MHz amplifiers driving a tapered stripline pickup/kicker. A software GUI allows specification of various modulation signals, selection of bunches and turns to excite, while a remote control interface allows simple control/monitoring of the RF power stages located in the tunnel. The successful use of this system for SPS MD measurements in 2011 is a vital proof-of-principle for wideband feedback using similar functions to correct the beam motion.
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