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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1950-1959
Thrust Augmentation of a Turbojet Engine at Simulated Flight Conditions by Introduction of a Water-Alcohol Mixture into the Compressor

Thrust Augmentation of a Turbojet Engine at Simulated Flight Conditions by Introduction of a Water-Alcohol Mixture into the Compressor

Date: August 18, 1952
Creator: Useller, James W.; Auble, Carmon M. & Harvey, Ray W., Sr.
Description: An investigation was conducted at simulated high-altitude flight conditions to evaluate the use of compressor evaporative cooling as a means of turbojet-engine thrust augmentation. Comparison of the performance of the engine with water-alcohol injection at the compressor inlet, at the sixth stage of the compressor, and at the sixth and ninth stages was made. From consideration of the thrust increases achieved, the interstage injection of the coolant was considered more desirable preferred over the combined sixth- and ninth-stage injection because of its relative simplicity. A maximum augmented net-thrust ratio of 1.106 and a maximum augmented jet-thrust ratio of 1.062 were obtained at an augmented liquid ratio of 2.98 and an engine-inlet temperature of 80 F. At lower inlet temperatures (-40 to 40 F), the maximum augmented net-thrust ratios ranged from 1.040 to 1.076 and the maximum augmented jet-thrust ratios ranged from 1.027 to 1.048, depending upon the inlet temperature. The relatively small increase in performance at the lower inlet-air temperatures can be partially attributed to the inadequate evaporation of the water-alcohol mixture, but the more significant limitation was believed to be caused by the negative influence of the liquid coolant on engine- component performance. In general, it is concluded that ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Thrust augmentation of a turbojet engine by the introduction of liquid ammonia into the compressor inlet

Thrust augmentation of a turbojet engine by the introduction of liquid ammonia into the compressor inlet

Date: August 13, 1952
Creator: Harp, James L , Jr; Useller, James W & Auble, Carmon M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Thrust characteristics of a series of convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles at subsonic and supersonic flight speeds

Thrust characteristics of a series of convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles at subsonic and supersonic flight speeds

Date: March 12, 1954
Creator: Fradenburgh, Evan A; Gorton, Gerald C & Beke, Andrew
Description: An experimental investigation of a series of four convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles was conducted in the Lewis 8-by-6 foot supersonic wind tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.1, 0.6, 1.6, and 2.0 over a range of nozzle pressure ratios. The thrust characteristics of these nozzles were determined by a pressure-integration technique. From a thrust standpoint, a nozzle designed to give uniform parallel flow at the exit had no advantage over the simple geometric design with conical convergent and divergent sections. The rapid-divergent nozzles might be competitive with the more gradual-divergent nozzles since the relatively short length of these nozzles would be advantageous from a weight standpoint and might result in smaller thrust losses due to friction. The thrusts, with friction losses neglected, were predicted satisfactorily by one-dimensional theory for the nozzles with relatively gradual divergence. The thrusts of the rapid-divergent designs were several percentages below the theoretical values at the design pressure ratio or above, while at low pressure ratios there was a considerable effect of free-stream Mach number, with thrusts considerably above theoretical values at subsonic speeds and somewhat above theoretical values at supersonic speeds. This Mach numb effect appeared to be related to the variation of the model base pressure ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Thrust loading of the NACA 3-(3)(05)-05 eight-blade dual-rotating propeller as determined from wake surveys

Thrust loading of the NACA 3-(3)(05)-05 eight-blade dual-rotating propeller as determined from wake surveys

Date: October 30, 1952
Creator: Platt, Robert J , Jr
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Time correlator for problems in aerodynamics

Time correlator for problems in aerodynamics

Date: June 1, 1956
Creator: Skinner, George Tolmie
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Time-dependent buckling of a uniformly heated column

Time-dependent buckling of a uniformly heated column

Date: January 1, 1954
Creator: Ness, Nathan
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Time-dependent downwash at the tail and the pitching moment due to normal acceleration at supersonic speeds

Time-dependent downwash at the tail and the pitching moment due to normal acceleration at supersonic speeds

Date: February 1, 1950
Creator: Ribner, Herbert S
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Time histories of horizontal-tail loads, elevator loads, and deformations on a jet-powered bomber airplane during abrupt pitching maneuvers at approximately 20,000 feet

Time histories of horizontal-tail loads, elevator loads, and deformations on a jet-powered bomber airplane during abrupt pitching maneuvers at approximately 20,000 feet

Date: November 29, 1950
Creator: Wiener, Bernard & Harris, Agnes E
Description: Time histories are presented of horizontal-tail loads, elevator loads, and deformations on a jet-powered bomber during abrupt pitching maneuvers at a pressure altitude of approximately 20,000 feet. The normal and pitching accelerations measured varied from -0.90b to 3.41g and from -0.73 to 0.80 radian per second per second (sic), respectively, with a Mach number variation of from 0.40 to o.75. The maximum horizontal-tail load measured was 17,250 pounds down. The maximum elevator load was 1900 pounds up. The stabilizer twisted a maximum of 0.76 degrees leading edge down at the tip. The greatest fuselage deflection at the tail was about 1.7 inches down.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Time histories of horizontal-tail loads, elevator loads, and deformations on a jet-powered bomber airplane during wind-up turns at approximately 15,000 feet and 22,500 feet

Time histories of horizontal-tail loads, elevator loads, and deformations on a jet-powered bomber airplane during wind-up turns at approximately 15,000 feet and 22,500 feet

Date: August 17, 1950
Creator: Mcgowan, William A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Time histories of maneuvers performed with an F-86A airplane during squadron operations

Time histories of maneuvers performed with an F-86A airplane during squadron operations

Date: February 11, 1952
Creator: Hamer, Harold A & Henderson, Campbell
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department