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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Wind-Tunnel Development of Ailerons for the Curtiss XP-60 Airplanem Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Development of Ailerons for the Curtiss XP-60 Airplanem Special Report

Date: September 1, 1942
Creator: Rogallo, F. M. & Lowry, John G.
Description: An investigation was made in the LWAL 7- by 10-foot tunnel of internally balanced, sealed ailerons for the Curtiss XP-60 airplane. Ailerons with tabs and. with various amounts of balance were tested. Stick forces were estimated for several aileron arrangements including an arrangement recommended for the airplane. Flight tests of the recommended arrangement are discussed briefly in an appendix, The results of the wind-tunnel and flight tests indicate that the ailerons of large or fast airplanes may be satisfactorily balanced by the method developed.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Air Inlet and Outlet Openings for Aircraft, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Air Inlet and Outlet Openings for Aircraft, Special Report

Date: October 1, 1938
Creator: Rogallo, Francis M. & Gauvain, William E.
Description: An investigation was made in the NACA 5-foot vertical wind tunnel of a large variety of duct inlets and outlets to obtain information relative to their design for the cooling or the ventilation systems on aircraft. Most of the tests were of openings in a flat plate but, in order to determine the best locations and the effects of interference, a few tests were made of openings in an airfoil. The best inlet location for a system not including a blower was found to be at the forward stagnation point; for one including a blower, the best location was found to be in the region of lowest total head, probably in the boundary layer near the trailing edge. Design recommendations are given, and it is shown that correct design demands a knowledge of the external flow and of the internal requirements in addition to that obtained from the results of the wind tunnel tests.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an N.A.C.A. 23012 Airfoil with a Slotted Flap and Three Types of Auxiliary Flap

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an N.A.C.A. 23012 Airfoil with a Slotted Flap and Three Types of Auxiliary Flap

Date: December 1, 1938
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J. & Gauvain, Wiliam E.
Description: An investigation was made in the N.A.C.A. 7- by 10- foot wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic section characteristics of an N. A. C. A. 23012 airfoil with a single main slotted flap equipped successively with auxiliary flaps of the plain, split, and slotted types. A test installation mas used in which an airfoil of 7-foot span was mounted vertically between the upper and the lower sides of the closed test section so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. On the basis of maximum lift coefficient, low drag at moderate and high lift coefficients, and high drag at high lift coefficients, the optimum combination of the arrangements was found to be the double slotted flap . All the auxiliary flaps tested, however, increased the magnitudes of the pitching moments over those of the main slotted flap alone.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA 66,2-216 Low-Drag Wing with Split Flaps of Various Sizes, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA 66,2-216 Low-Drag Wing with Split Flaps of Various Sizes, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1941
Creator: Muse, Thomas C. & Neely, Robert H.
Description: An investigation was conducted in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel of a rectangular wing having NACA 66, 2-216 low-drag airfoil sections and various sizes of simple split flaps. The purpose of the investigation was, primarily, to determine the influence of these flap installations on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. Complete lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics were determined for a range of test Reynolds numbers from about 2,600,000 to 4,600,000 for each of the installations and for the plain wing. The results of this investigation indicate that values of maximum lift coefficient similar to those of wings with conventional airfoil sections and split flaps can be expected of wings having the NACA 66,2-216 low-drag sections. The increment of maximum lift due to the split flap was found to be practically independent of the Reynolds number over the range investigated. The optimum split flap on the basis of maximum lift appears to have a chord about 20% of the wing chord and a deflection of 60 degrees. The C(sub L) max of the wing with the 0.20c partial-span flap deflected 60 degrees is 2.07 at a Reynolds number of 4,600,000 while with the full-span flap it is approximately 2.53; the ...
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA Low-Drag Tapered Wing with Straight Trailing Edge and Simple Split Flaps, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA Low-Drag Tapered Wing with Straight Trailing Edge and Simple Split Flaps, Special Report

Date: December 1, 1941
Creator: Muse, Thomas C. & Neely, Robert H.
Description: An investigation was conducted in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel of a tapered wing with straight railing edge having NACA 66 series low-drag airfoil sections and equipped with full-span and partial-span simple split flaps. The airfoil sections used were the NACA 66,2-116 at the root and the 66,2-216 at the tip. The primary purpose of the investigation was to determine the effect of the split flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of the tapered wing. Complete lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients were determined for the plain wing and for each flap arrangement through a Reynold number range of 2,600,000 to 4,600,000. The results of this investigation indicate that values of maximum lift coefficient comparable to values obtained on tapered wings with conventional sections and similar flap installations can be obtained from wings with the NACA low-drag sections. The increment of maximum lift due to the split flap was found to vary somewhat with Reynold number over the range investigated. The C(sub L)max of the wing alone is 1.49 at a Reynolds number of 4,600,000; whereas with the partial-span simple split flap it is 2.22 and with the full-span arrangement, 2.80. Observations of wool tufts on the wing indicate that the ...
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Rectangular Air-Duct Entrances in the Leading Edge of an NACA 23018 Wing, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Rectangular Air-Duct Entrances in the Leading Edge of an NACA 23018 Wing, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1940
Creator: Biermann, David & McLellan, Charles H.
Description: A preliminary investigation of a number of duct entrances of rectangular shape installed in the leading edge of a wing was conducted in the NACA 20-foot tunnel to determine the external drag, the available pressure, the critical Mach numbers, and the effect on the maximum lift. The results showed that the most satisfactory entrances, which had practically no effect on the wing characteristics, had their lips approximately in the vertical plane of the leading edge of the wing. This requirement necessitated extending the lips outside the wing contour for all except the small entrances. Full dynamic pressure was found to be available over a fairly wide range of angle of attack. The critical Mach number for a small entrance was calculated to be as high as that for the plain wing but was slightly lower for the larger entrances tested.
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Wind-tunnel investigation of several factors affecting the performance of a high-speed pursuit airplane with air-cooled radial engine

Wind-tunnel investigation of several factors affecting the performance of a high-speed pursuit airplane with air-cooled radial engine

Date: November 1, 1941
Creator: Wenzinger, C. J.
Description: None
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Lift Characteristics of an NACA 27-212 Airfoil Equipped with Two Types of Flap, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Lift Characteristics of an NACA 27-212 Airfoil Equipped with Two Types of Flap, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1940
Creator: Swanson, Robert S. & Schuldenfrei, Marvin J.
Description: An investigation has been made in the NACA 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large chord NACA 27-212 airfoil with a 20% chord split flap and with two arrangements of a 25.66% chord slotted flap to determine the section lift characteristics as affected by flap deflection for the split flap and as affected by flap deflection, flap position, and slot shape for the slotted flap. For the two arrangements of the slotted flap, the flap positions for maximum section lift are given. Comparable data on the NACA 23012 airfoil equipped with similar flaps are also given. On the basis of maximum section lift coefficient, the slotted flap with an easy slot entry was slightly better than either the split flap or the slotted flap with a sharp slot entry. With both types of flap the decrease in the angle of attack, for maximum section lift coefficient, with flap deflection is large for the NACA 27-212 airfoil as compared with the NACA 23012 airfoil. Also with both flaps, the maximum section lift coefficient obtained with flaps is much lower for the NACA 27-212 airfoil than for the NACA 23012 airfoil.
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Wind-Tunnel Tests of Several Model Tractor-Propeller and Pusher-Propeller Wing Extension-Shaft Arrangements, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Tests of Several Model Tractor-Propeller and Pusher-Propeller Wing Extension-Shaft Arrangements, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1941
Creator: Harmon, Hubert N.
Description: Tests were made in the 20-foot propeller-research tunnel to investigate the possibility of obtaining increased net efficiencies of propeller-nacelle units by enclosing the engines in the wings and by using extension shafts. A wing of 5-foot chord was fitted with a propeller drive assembly providing for several axial locations of tractor propellers and pusher propellers. A three-blade 4-foot propeller and a three-blade 3 1/2-foot propeller of special design were tested in this wing with spinners and fairings ranging in diameter from 6 to 16 inches. A 16-inch NACA cowling was tested for comparative purposes. Two types of cuffs were also employed. It was found that the net efficiency of a conventional round-shank propeller mounted on an extension shaft in front of or behind a wing increased with an increase in the diameter of the spinner and the shaft housing within the scope of the tests. The largest spinner used had a diameter that might favorably compare with that of a radial engine cowling. The efficiencies for the pusher position appeared to be more critically affected by spinner size than those for the tractor position. The spinners with large diameters for the pusher position resulted in a higher efficiency than those ...
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Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

Date: February 1, 1940
Creator: Delano, James B.
Description: Investigations of the pressure distribution, the profile drag, and the location of transition for a 30-inch-chord 25-percent-thick N.A,C.A. 45-125 airfoil were made in the N.A.C.A 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of aiding in the development of a thick wing for high-speed airplanes. The tests were made at a lift coefficient of 0.1 for Reynolds Numbers from 1,750,000 to 8,690,000, corresponding to speeds from 80 to 440 miles per hour at 59 F. The effect on the profile drag of fixing the transition point was also investigated. The effect of compressibility on the rate of increase of pressure coefficients was found to be greater than that predicted by a simplified theoretical expression for thin wings. The results indicated that, for a lift coefficient of 0.1, the critical speed of the N.A.C,A. 45-125 airfoil was about 460 miles per hour at 59 F,. The value of the profile-drag coefficient at a Reynolds Number of 4,500,000 was 0.0058, or about half as large as the value for the N.A,C,A. 0025 airfoil. The increase in the profile-drag coefficient for a given movement of the transition point was about three times as large as the corresponding increase for the N.A.C,A. 0012 airfoil. Transition ...
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