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MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY

Date: December 31, 2008
Creator: Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D & Ned Bibler, N
Description: This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 ...
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Solid State Lighting Program

Solid State Lighting Program

Date: November 30, 2007
Creator: Moustakas, Theodore D.
Description: The project had two main tasks: One addressed the materials and device development and it was carried out at Boston University. The second addressed the theory and simulation of materials and devices and it was carried out at Science Application International Corporation (SAIC). Each task had a number of sub-tasks which are described in the following table. Progress in these tasks is described in this section.
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Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Ryon, Michael G; Parr, Patricia Dreyer & Cohen, Kari
Description: Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.
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Mechanisms of disease: epithelial-mesenchymal transition and back again: does cellular plasticity fuel neoplastic progression?

Mechanisms of disease: epithelial-mesenchymal transition and back again: does cellular plasticity fuel neoplastic progression?

Date: February 13, 2008
Creator: Bissell, Mina J; Turley, Eva A.; Veiseh, Mandana; Radisky, Derek C. & Bissell, Mina J.
Description: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a conversion that facilitates organ morphogenesis and tissue remodeling in physiological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing. A similar phenotypic conversion is also detected in fibrotic diseases and neoplasia, which is associated with disease progression. EMT in cancer epithelial cells often seems to be an incomplete and bi-directional process. In this Review, we discuss the phenomenon of EMT as it pertains to tumor development, focusing on exceptions to the commonly held rule that EMT promotes invasion and metastasis. We also highlight the role of the RAS-controlled signaling mediators, ERK1, ERK2 and PI3-kinase, as microenvironmental responsive regulators of EMT.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Search for Higgs boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

Search for Higgs boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

Date: December 1, 2006
Creator: Kusakabe, Yoshiaki & U., /Waseda
Description: We performed a search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with W boson (p{bar p} {yields} W{sup {+-}}H {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The search uses the data collected between February 2002 and February 2006 at Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1}. The experimental final state of WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} process is lepton (e{sup {+-}}/{mu}{sup {+-}}), missing transverse energy and two jets. The largest background in lepton+jets events is W+light flavor process, therefore the identification of jets as b-jets reduces this kind of background significantly. We used displaced SECondary VerTeX b-tagging (SECVTX) technique, which utilizes the signature that b-jets have secondary vertex displaced away from primary vertex because of the long life time of B-mesons. However, there is still much contamination in SECVTX b-tagged jets. Finite resolution of secondary vertex tracking measurements results in false tags, and c-jets are also identified as b-jets due to the long life time of D-mesons frequently. For the purpose of increasing the purity of the SECVTX b-tagged jets, we applied Neural Network to SECVTX tagged jets for the first time by using secondary vertex ...
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Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Other Particle Methods for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Fractured and Porous Media

Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Other Particle Methods for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Fractured and Porous Media

Date: June 1, 2008
Creator: Meakin, Paul & Xu, Zhijie
Description: Particle methods are much less computationally efficient than grid based numerical solution of the Navier Stokes equation, and they have been used much less extensively, particularly for engineering applications. However, they have important advantages for some applications. These advantages include rigorous mast conservation, momentum conservation and isotropy. In addition, there is no need for explicit interface tracking/capturing. Code development effort is relatively low, and it is relatively simple to simulate flows with moving boundaries. In addition, it is often quite easy to include coupling of fluid flow with other physical phenomena such a phase separation. Here we describe the application of three particle methods: molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics. While these methods were developed to simulate fluids and other materials on three quite different scales – the molecular, meso and continuum scales, they are very closely related from a computational point of view. The mesoscale (between the molecular and continuum scales) dissipative particle dynamics method can be used to simulate systems that are too large to simulate using molecular dynamics but small enough for thermal fluctuations to play an important role. Important examples include polymer solutions, gels, small particle suspensions and membranes. In these applications inter ...
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How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

Date: May 10, 2008
Creator: Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W. & Ritchie, R.O.
Description: Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses ...
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The influence of deep-seabed CO2 sequestration on small metazoan (meiofaunal) viability and community structure: final technical report

The influence of deep-seabed CO2 sequestration on small metazoan (meiofaunal) viability and community structure: final technical report

Date: September 30, 2008
Creator: Thistle, D
Description: Since the industrial revolution, the burning of fossil fuel has produced carbon dioxide at an increasing rate. Present atmospheric concentration is about ~1.5 times the preindustrial level and is rising. Because carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas, its increased concentration in the atmosphere is thought to be a cause of global warming. If so, the rate of global warming could be slowed if industrial carbon dioxide were not released into the atmosphere. One suggestion has been to sequester it in the deep ocean, but theory predicts that deep-sea species will be intolerant of the increased concentrations of carbon dioxide and the increased acidity it would cause. The aim of our research was to test for consequences of carbon dioxide sequestration on deep-sea, sediment-dwelling meiofauna. Recent technical advances allowed us to test for effects in situ at depths proposed for sequestration. The basic experimental unit was an open-topped container into which we pumped ~20 L of liquid carbon dioxide. The liquid carbon dioxide mixed with near-bottom sea water, which produced carbon dioxide-rich sea water that flowed out over the near-by seabed. We did 30-day experiments at several locations and with different numbers of carbon dioxide-filled containers. Harpacticoid copepods (Crustacea) were our ...
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Significant Lifetime and Background Improvements in PEP-II by Reducing the 3rd Order Chromaticity in LER with Orbit Bumps

Significant Lifetime and Background Improvements in PEP-II by Reducing the 3rd Order Chromaticity in LER with Orbit Bumps

Date: December 18, 2007
Creator: Decker, F.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Sullivan, M.; Yocky, G. & /SLAC
Description: Orbit bumps in sextupoles are routinely used for tuning the luminosity in the PEP-II B-Factory. Anti-symmetric bumps at a pair of identical sextupoles separated by -I section generate the net dispersion, while symmetric horizontal bumps induce a tune shift and beta beat. By combining two of these symmetric bumps with opposite signs, where the second pair is 90{sup o} away, the tune shift cancels and the beta beat doubles. In the low energy ring (LER), there are four -I sextupole pairs per arc, located one after another 90{sup o} apart, where pairs 1 and 3 are at the same phase and pairs 2 and 4 are 90{sup o} away. By making two symmetric bumps with opposite sign in pairs 1 and 3, the tune shift and beta beat outside this region cancel, but there is a local change of phase and beta in the 2nd sextupole pair located in the middle. By using this bump knob, the LER lifetime improved by a factor of 3, losses by a factor of 5, and the beam-beam background in the drift chamber of the BaBar detector by 20%. Optics analysis showed that the local phase change at the 2nd sextupole pair can compensate ...
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The Two-Loop Six-Point MHV Amplitude in Maximally Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory

The Two-Loop Six-Point MHV Amplitude in Maximally Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory

Date: March 12, 2008
Creator: Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Kosower, D.A.; Roiban, R.; Spradlin, M.; Vergu, C. et al.
Description: We give a representation of the parity-even part of the planar two-loop six-gluon MHV amplitude of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory, in terms of loop-momentum integrals with simple dual conformal properties. We evaluate the integrals numerically in order to test directly the ABDK/BDS all-loop ansatz for planar MHV amplitudes. We find that the ansatz requires an additive remainder function, in accord with previous indications from strong-coupling and Regge limits. The planar six-gluon amplitude can also be compared with the hexagonal Wilson loop computed by Drummond, Henn, Korchemsky and Sokatchev in arXiv:0803.1466 [hep-th]. After accounting for differing singularities and other constants independent of the kinematics, we find that the Wilson loop and MHV-amplitude remainders are identical, to within our numerical precision. This result provides non-trivial confirmation of a proposed n-point equivalence between Wilson loops and planar MHV amplitudes, and suggests that an additional mechanism besides dual conformal symmetry fixes their form at six points and beyond.
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Microalgae Culture Collection: 1984-1985

Microalgae Culture Collection: 1984-1985

Date: September 1, 1984
Creator: Available, Not
Description: The Microalgae Culture Collection at the Solar Energy Research Institute has been established for the maintenance and distribution of strains that have been characterized for biomass fuel applications.
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MODIFICATION OF SURFACE AND TRIBOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF DLC FILMS BY ADDING SILVER CONTENT

MODIFICATION OF SURFACE AND TRIBOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF DLC FILMS BY ADDING SILVER CONTENT

Date: June 12, 2008
Creator: Zhang, Hanshen S.; Endrino, Jose L. & Anders, Andre
Description: The incorporation of silver into the diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings has shown excellent potential in various applications; therefore the surface and tribological properties of silver-containing DLC thin films deserve to be investigated. In this study we have deposited silver-containing hydrogenated and hydrogen-free DLC coatings by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano-scratch tests were used to study the surface and tribological properties. The silver incorporation had only slight effects on hydrogenated DLC coatings. However, the incorporation of silver has significant effect on hydrogen-free DLC of smoothing the surface and increasing the surface energy. Those effects have been illustrated and explained in the context of experimental results.
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Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

Date: September 1, 2008
Creator: Kelly, Dana L. & Rasmuson, Dale M.
Description: This paper describes the approach taken by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the treatment of common-cause failure in probabilistic risk assessment of operational events. The approach is based upon the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, and examples are illustrated using the alpha-factor parameterization, the approach adopted by the NRC in their Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared common-cause failure potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g., failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper. These methods are being applied by the NRC in assessing the risk significance of operational events for the Significance Determination Process (SDP) and the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program.
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High gain FEL amplification of charge modulation caused by a hadron

High gain FEL amplification of charge modulation caused by a hadron

Date: August 24, 2008
Creator: Litvinenko,V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Pozdeyev, E.; Wang, G. et al.
Description: In scheme of coherent electron cooling (CeC) [1,2], a modulation of electron beam density induced by a copropagation hadron is amplified in high gain FEL. The resulting amplified modulation of electron beam, its shape, form and its lethargy determine number of important properties of the coherent electron cooling. In this talk we present both analytical and numerical (using codes RON [3] and Genesis [4]) evaluations of the corresponding Green functions. We also discuss influence of electron beam parameters on the FEL response.
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Characterization of Direct-Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms

Characterization of Direct-Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms

Date: December 21, 2007
Creator: Brown, Christopher F.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Iovin, Cristian et al.
Description: Geochemical tests provide evidence for the transit of a plume of caustic waste solution through the sediment column at the Hanford 241-B and -BX Tank Farms. Direct-push samples recovered from boreholes surrounding Tanks 241-B-110 and 241-BX-102 and related waste transfer lines and diversion boxes included sediments typical of those previously recovered from other localities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford formation sediments are dominantly quartzo-feldspathic sands strewn with lithic fragments, displaying a range of particle size distributions and sorting characteristics. Some moderately well-sorted, fine-grained lithologies are interpreted as lenticular bodies irregularly dispersed in coarser-grained, more poorly sorted sediments. Tier I tests conducted on the vadose zone sediments revealed an inverse correlation between moisture content and sediment size fraction (i.e., there is greater moisture content in finer-grained sediments). The Tier I tests also showed that the pore water solutions were likely sodium-rich, moderately saline, and possessed higher pH values than background (untainted) sediments. These data are characteristic of sediments that have encountered sodium-rich, saline, caustic waste solution, as documented in other reports at other suspect contamination sites around Hanford. Analyses of solutions from 1:1 water extracts reveal relatively balanced cation and anion concentrations, indicating that most of the geochemical species have ...
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Submittal of Final Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, December 2007

Submittal of Final Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, December 2007

Date: January 31, 2008
Creator: Restoration, NSTec Environmental
Description: This letter serves as the post-closure monitoring letter report for the above Corrective Action Unit (CAU) for calendar year 2007. CAU 91 is inspected every six months. The first inspection was conducted on March 29,2007, and the second inspection was conducted on September 27, 2007. Vegetation growth around the edge of the aboveground monument concrete pad was observed during the March inspection. This vegetation was removed on May 24,2007. All access roads, fences, gates, and signs were in excellent condition. No settling, cracking, or erosion was observed on the cover, and the use restriction had been maintained. No issues were identified, and no corrective actions were needed as a result of the September inspection. The post-closure inspection checklists for CAU 91 are attached. Photographs and field notes taken during site inspections are maintained in the project files.
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Reliability R&D; DOE Program Review (Presentation)

Reliability R&D; DOE Program Review (Presentation)

Date: April 1, 2008
Creator: Quintana, M. A. & Kurtz, S. R.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

Date: May 1, 2008
Creator: Bryant, Nathan
Description: This document presents a summary and framework of available transport data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater transport model. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.
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Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2007 Data

Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2007 Data

Date: March 1, 2008
Creator: Analysis and Evaluation, Science Education Programs
Description: The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2006, and August 1, 2007, and fall 2007 enrollments. Thirty-one academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2007, and data was obtained for all thirty-one.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Longitudinal Density Modulation and Energy Conversion in Intense Beams

Longitudinal Density Modulation and Energy Conversion in Intense Beams

Date: February 17, 2006
Creator: Harris, J; Neumann, J; Tian, K & O'Shea, P
Description: Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may under some circumstances be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams, and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New York (Fact Sheet)

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New York (Fact Sheet)

Date: June 1, 2008
Creator: Available, Not
Description: The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New York. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New York to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,230 million gallons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

Date: January 10, 2008
Creator: Sulloway, E. J. Farris and H. M.
Description: This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
2005 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

2005 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

Date: February 1, 2006
Creator: Nevada, Bechtel
Description: This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2005 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. In additon to providing groundwater monitoring results, this report also includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Ny County, Nevada.
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Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory Drain Field Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-020

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory Drain Field Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-020

Date: October 16, 2008
Creator: Capron, J. M.
Description: The 331 Life Sciences Laboratory Drain Field (LSLDF) septic system waste site consists of a diversion chamber, two septic tanks, a distribution box, and a drain field. This septic system was designed to receive sanitary waste water, from animal studies conducted in the 331-A and 331-B Buildings, for discharge into the soil column. However, field observations and testing suggest the 331 LSLDF septic system did not receive any discharges. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of the 331 LSLDF waste site to No Action. This site does not have a deep zone or other condition that would warrant an institutional control in accordance with the 300-FF-2 ROD under the industrial land use scenario.
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