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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Collection: USDA Farmers' Bulletins
Grasshoppers and Their Control

Grasshoppers and Their Control

Date: 1939
Creator: Parker, J. R.
Description: "Grasshoppers in a single year have destroyed crops valued at over a hundred million dollars. The best way to prevent losses is the use of poisoned bait supplemented by tillage and seeding methods which restrict egg laying and imprison the young grasshoppers in the ground after they hatch. Bait is most effective while grasshoppers are still on their hatching grounds or massed along field margins. It should be put out when grasshoppers are doing their first feeding of the day. This usually occurs between 6 and 10 a.m. at temperatures of 70° to 80°F. Bait should not be spread unless grasshoppers are actively feeding. In mixing and distributing the poisoned bait care should be taken to prevent injury to persons and farm animals. Seeding grain only on plowed or summer-fallowed ground and plowing infested stubble before the eggs hatch greatly reduces the quantity of bait needed for control and decreases the liability of crop injury. Cooperation in the use of control methods by all the farmers in a community is necessary for best results." -- p. i
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Date: 1939
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-
Description: "This bulletin briefly traces the circumstances which have created the soil problems in the southern Great Plains and shows how the hand of man has hastened present troubles. But it goes further and deals with the methods now being used to solve the problem on nature's own terms." -- p. 2-3. Some of the solutions discussed include contour farming, terraces, water conservation techniques, crop lines, and revegetation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Culture and Pests of Field Peas

Culture and Pests of Field Peas

Date: 1938
Creator: McKee, Roland & Schoth, H. A. (Harry August), b. 1891
Description: This bulletin discusses the culture of the field and diseases and insects which commonly afflict it. Diseases discussed include leaf spot, stem blight, bacterial blight, left blotch, powdery mildew, downy mildew, anthracnose, fusarium wilt, root rot, and mosaic. The pea weevil, aphid, and moth are the insects discussed, as well as the nematode.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Hotbeds and Coldframes

Hotbeds and Coldframes

Date: 1935
Creator: W. R. (William Renwick) Beattie, b. 1870
Description: This bulletin describes the uses of hotbeds and coldframes in starting early plants. The hotbeds discussed include manure hotbeds, fuel-heated beds, and electric heating in beds and greenhouses. Coverings and care and maintenance are also discussed. Possible plants for early growth include tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, squashes, cucumbers, muskmelons, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and celery.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Date: 1932
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Date: 1930
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Chestnut Blight

Chestnut Blight

Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.
Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Farmer Looks Ahead

The Farmer Looks Ahead

Date: 1937
Creator: United States. Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Description: This bulletin provides criteria by which farmers may determine how much they should plan to produce in a given year. There "are four major yardsticks: 1) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of the requirements of domestic consumers, plus; 2) What they can expect to ship to foreign countries in the next few years? 3) How much should they produce, thinking only of the requirements of soil conservation? 4) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of their incomes?" -- p. 3
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Farm Practice with Lespedeza

Farm Practice with Lespedeza

Date: 1934
Creator: Miller, H. A.
Description: "The use of lespedeza as a farm crop has rapidly increased during the past few years. The increase in the use of lespedeza is due partly to the excellent results that have been obtained by the farmers who have been growing the Common variety, for hay and for pasture and soil improvement, but more particularly to the introduction of some new varieties that produce better yields, are adapted to a wider range of climatic conditions, and are generally better suited to the needs of the average farm than is the Common variety. This bulletin is based on information collected from farmers located in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky who are growing lespedeza regularly as a farm crop. The information includes methods of seeding, varieties used, the place in the cropping system usually occupied by lespedeza, and practices that have developed in connection with the production and use of the crop in these States." -- p. 1
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Infectious Anemia (Swamp Fever)

Infectious Anemia (Swamp Fever)

Date: 1938
Creator: Gochenour, William S. (William Sylva), b. 1891; Stein, C. D. (Clarence Dinsmore), b. 1889 & Osteen, Oswald L. (Oswald Lamont), b. 1908
Description: Infectious anemia (which is also known as swamp fever) is a disease which afflicts horses and mules and results in significant financial losses for farms every year. This bulletin discusses the causes and forms of the disease, the accompanying anatomical changes in infected animals, the diagnostic process, and control measures which can be taken to prevent further spread of this serious illness.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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