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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Collection: USDA Farmers' Bulletins
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Date: 1932
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P.
Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preventing Soil Blowing on the Southern Great Plains

Preventing Soil Blowing on the Southern Great Plains

Date: 1937
Creator: Chilcott, E. F. (Ellery Franklin), 1885-
Description: "Soil blowing is often a serious problem from December to May [in the Southern Great Plains], when the soil is, in many cases, bare and winds are high. This period is often referred to as the 'blow season.' The whole art of preventing and controlling soil blowing consists in keeping nonblowing materials on the surface. These may be crops, crop residues, or clods. When crops are absent, the essential feature in preventing soil blowing is the use of implements that lift clods and other nonblowing materials to the surface rather than implements that pulverize or destroy them.... Since tillage is dependent on implements, it seems of first importance to consider the implements that may be used to discuss their merits and shortcomings in relation to soil blowing.... From the general principles stated and the specific examples of implement use given, most farmers can probably decide on the correct applications for their farms." -- p. 1-3
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Saving Soil with Sod in the Ohio Valley Region

Saving Soil with Sod in the Ohio Valley Region

Date: 1939
Creator: Welton, Kenneth
Description: Clearing of forests, overgrazing, and soil erosion have greatly depleted the soil of the Ohio Valley in the United States. Farmers should implement agricultural practices that encourage the growth of sod, which has the potential to restore the soil. "The use of grass in increasing the productivity of farm land, in conserving soil on pasture and cropland, and in protecting smaller eroded or erodible areas is discussed in this bulletin." -- p. i
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Removing Spray Residue From Apples and Pears

Removing Spray Residue From Apples and Pears

Date: 1931
Creator: Diehl, H. C.
Description: This bulletin gives instructions for removing spray residue from apples and pears. "Control of the codling moth has become essential in the production of marketable apples and pears in practically all deciduous-fruit districts of the United States, and through spraying with lead-aresenate has been for many years the accepted control method. Apples and pears sprayed with lead arsenate bear at harvest time an arsenical residue, and this residue must be removed in the interest of public health." -- p. 1
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Grading Wool

Grading Wool

Date: 1939
Creator: Christie, James W.
Description: Revised edition. "Most wool growers need to know more about wool grading, whether they expect to grade wool or not. This bulletin contains information about the subject so growers interested may improve their position when they are ready to sell their wool. It also suggests ways to handle the wool so that its quality will be maintained through the shearing and the preparation of the fleece." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Making Lime on the Farm

Making Lime on the Farm

Date: 1938
Creator: Kessler, N. A.
Description: "The farmer can buy lime from commercial sources in the form and degree of purity desired; he can produce his own if he has a convenient supply of raw material; or he can cooperate with his neighbors in working a deposit. This bulletin deals with factors which should be considered by a farmer or a group of farmers before investing in equipment for obtaining lime from limestone or marl." -- p. 1
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Infectious Anemia (Swamp Fever)

Infectious Anemia (Swamp Fever)

Date: 1938
Creator: Gochenour, William S. (William Sylva), b. 1891
Description: Infectious anemia (which is also known as swamp fever) is a disease which afflicts horses and mules and results in significant financial losses for farms every year. This bulletin discusses the causes and forms of the disease, the accompanying anatomical changes in infected animals, the diagnostic process, and control measures which can be taken to prevent further spread of this serious illness.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Soil Defense in the Northeast

Soil Defense in the Northeast

Date: 1938
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-
Description: This bulletin discusses methods of soil conservation in the northeastern United States that can prevent erosion. Soil conservation practices vary with the type of agriculture being used. In addition to general farming, conservation for dairying, orcharding, market gardening, and single-crop farming are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Terrace Outlets and Farm Drainageways

Terrace Outlets and Farm Drainageways

Date: 1939
Creator: Hamilton, C. L.
Description: "This bulletin is a compilation of the best information now available for farmers on the construction and use of terrace outlets and the protection, improvement, and maintenance of other sloping drainageways. The term "drainageways" as used in this bulletin refers primarily to channels of surface drainage in the upper reaches of watersheds or in unit drainage basins. 'Outlet' is a more restricted term and refers only to drainageways that are provided to receive and convey the discharge from the ends of terraces. The scope of this material is limited to surface runoff-disposal measures required in upland or rolling terrain where slopes are steep enough to cause channel erosion. It does not cover surface drainage or underdrainage of flatlands where natural drainage is inadequate." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Farm Practice with Lespedeza

Farm Practice with Lespedeza

Date: 1934
Creator: Miller, H. A.
Description: "The use of lespedeza as a farm crop has rapidly increased during the past few years. The increase in the use of lespedeza is due partly to the excellent results that have been obtained by the farmers who have been growing the Common variety, for hay and for pasture and soil improvement, but more particularly to the introduction of some new varieties that produce better yields, are adapted to a wider range of climatic conditions, and are generally better suited to the needs of the average farm than is the Common variety. This bulletin is based on information collected from farmers located in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky who are growing lespedeza regularly as a farm crop. The information includes methods of seeding, varieties used, the place in the cropping system usually occupied by lespedeza, and practices that have developed in connection with the production and use of the crop in these States." -- p. 1
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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