You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Collection: USDA Farmers' Bulletins
Chestnut Blight

Chestnut Blight

Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.
Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Removing Spray Residue From Apples and Pears

Removing Spray Residue From Apples and Pears

Date: 1931
Creator: Diehl, H. C.; Lutz, J. M. (Jacob Martin), 1908-1968 & Ryall, A. Lloyd (Albert Lloyd), 1904-
Description: This bulletin gives instructions for removing spray residue from apples and pears. "Control of the codling moth has become essential in the production of marketable apples and pears in practically all deciduous-fruit districts of the United States, and through spraying with lead-aresenate has been for many years the accepted control method. Apples and pears sprayed with lead arsenate bear at harvest time an arsenical residue, and this residue must be removed in the interest of public health." -- p. 1
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Improving the Farm Environment for Wild Life

Improving the Farm Environment for Wild Life

Date: 1934
Creator: Grange, Wallace B. (Wallace Byron), 1905-1987 & McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962
Description: This bulletin discusses how farmers can improve their environment for wild life and game animals. Farmers should provide cover for wild life, ensure an adequate and continuous food supply, and take measures to protect wild life from farm operations, birds of prey, cats and dogs, diseases, etc.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Date: 1930
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Date: 1932
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Date: 1939
Creator: Hoover, Max M. (Max Manley), 1895-
Description: "The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Grading Wool

Grading Wool

Date: 1939
Creator: Christie, James W.
Description: Revised edition. "Most wool growers need to know more about wool grading, whether they expect to grade wool or not. This bulletin contains information about the subject so growers interested may improve their position when they are ready to sell their wool. It also suggests ways to handle the wool so that its quality will be maintained through the shearing and the preparation of the fleece." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Culture and Pests of Field Peas

Culture and Pests of Field Peas

Date: 1938
Creator: McKee, Roland & Schoth, H. A. (Harry August), b. 1891
Description: This bulletin discusses the culture of the field and diseases and insects which commonly afflict it. Diseases discussed include leaf spot, stem blight, bacterial blight, left blotch, powdery mildew, downy mildew, anthracnose, fusarium wilt, root rot, and mosaic. The pea weevil, aphid, and moth are the insects discussed, as well as the nematode.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Grading Dressed Turkeys

Grading Dressed Turkeys

Date: 1938
Creator: Heitz, Thomas W.
Description: "From the producer's standpoint, the correct grading of turkeys is a very important factor in the success of his enterprise. Without dependable grading, successful marketing is practically impossible, and without successful marketing, little profit may be expected. Whether the producer grades his own turkeys or has this done by a licensed grader, a familiarity with the grade descriptions and how the grades are applied will create a mutual understanding and be a source of satisfaction to producers, graders, and buyers. How to grade according to Government standards can be learned by any producer who makes a thorough study of the grade factors involved. This bulletin attempts to point out by description and illustration the most important of these factors." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Making Lime on the Farm

Making Lime on the Farm

Date: 1938
Creator: Kessler, N. A.
Description: "The farmer can buy lime from commercial sources in the form and degree of purity desired; he can produce his own if he has a convenient supply of raw material; or he can cooperate with his neighbors in working a deposit. This bulletin deals with factors which should be considered by a farmer or a group of farmers before investing in equipment for obtaining lime from limestone or marl." -- p. 1
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST