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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. IV - Manufacturing Irregularities, 5, Manufacturing Irregularities

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. IV - Manufacturing Irregularities, 5, Manufacturing Irregularities

Date: February 1, 1938
Creator: Robinson, Russell G.
Description: Tests were made in the NACA 8-foot high speed wind tunnel of a metal-covered, riveted, 'service' wing of average workmanship to determine the aerodynamic effects of the manufacturing irregularities incident to shop fabrication. The wing was of 5-foot chord and of NACA 23012 section and was tested in the low-lift range at speeds from 90 to 450 miles per hour corresponding to Reynolds numbers from 4,000,000 to 18,000,000. At a cruising condition the drag of the service wing was 46% higher than the drag of a smooth airfoil, whereas the drag of an accurately constructed airfoil having the same arrangement of 3/32-inch brazier-head rivets and lap joints showed a 29% increase. The difference, or 17% of the smooth-wing drag, is apparently the drag caused by the manufacturing irregularities: sheet waviness, departures from true profile, and imperfect laps. the service wing, for one condition at least, showed a drag increase due to compressibility at a lower air speed than did the more accurate airfoil.
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The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag, 3, Roughness

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag, 3, Roughness

Date: February 1, 1938
Creator: Hood, Manley J.
Description: Tests have been made in the N.A.C.A. 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel of the drag caused by roughness on the surface of an airfoil of N.A.C.A. 23012 section and 5-foot chord. The tests were made at speeds from 80 t o 500 miles per hour at lift coefficients from 0 to 0.30. For conditions corresponding to high-speed flight, the increase in the drag was 30 percent of the profile drag of the smooth airfoil for the roughness produced by spray painting and 63 percent for the roughness produced. by 0.0037-inch carborundum grains. About one-half the drag increase was caused by the roughness on the forward one-fourth of the airfoil. Sandpapering the painted surface with No. 400 sandpaper made it sufficiently smooth that the drag was no greater than when the surface was polished. In the lower part of the range investigated the drag due to roughness increased rapidly with Reynolds Number.
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Large-Scale Boundary-Layer Control Tests on Two Wings in the NACA 20-Foot Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Large-Scale Boundary-Layer Control Tests on Two Wings in the NACA 20-Foot Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Date: April 1, 1935
Creator: Freeman, Hugh B.
Description: Tests were made in the N.A.C.A. 20-foot wind tunnel on: (1) a wing, of 6.5-foot span, 5.5-foot chord, and 30 percent maximum thickness, fitted with large end plates and (2) a 16-foot span 2.67-foot chord wing of 15 percent maximum thickness to determine the increase in lift obtainable by removing the boundary layer and the power required for the blower. The results of the tests on the stub wing appeared more favorable than previous small-scale tests and indicated that: (1) the suction method was considerably superior to the pressure method, (2) single slots were more effective than multiple slots (where the same pressure was applied to all slots), the slot efficiency increased rapidly for increasing slot widths up to 2 percent of the wing chord and remained practically constant for all larger widths tested, (3) suction pressure and power requirements were quite low (a computation for a light airplane showed that a lift coefficient of 3.0 could be obtained with a suction as low as 2.3 times the dynamic pressure and a power expenditure less than 3 percent of the rated engine power), and (4) the volume of air required to be drawn off was quite high (approximately 0.5 cubic ...
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The Effect of Compressibility on the Growth of the Laminar Boundary Layer on Low-Drag Wings and Bodies

The Effect of Compressibility on the Growth of the Laminar Boundary Layer on Low-Drag Wings and Bodies

Date: January 1, 1943
Creator: Allen, H. Julian & Nitzberg, Gerald E.
Description: The development of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid is considered. Formulas are given for determining the boundary-layer thickness and the ratio of the boundary-layer Reynolds number to the body Reynolds number for airfoils and bodies of revolution. It i s shown that the effect of compressibility will profoundly alter the Reynolds number corresponding to the upper limit of the range of the low-drag coefficients . The available data indicate that for low-drag and high critical compressibility speed airfoils and bodies of revolution, this effect is favorable.
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Tests in the Variable-Density Tunnel of Seven Tapered Wings Having N.A.C.A. 230 Mean Lines, Special Report

Tests in the Variable-Density Tunnel of Seven Tapered Wings Having N.A.C.A. 230 Mean Lines, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1937
Creator: Anderson, Raymond F.
Description: At the request of the Materiel Division of the Army Air Corps, seven tapered wings having sections based on the N.A,C.A. 230 mean line were tested in the variable-density wind tunnel, The characteristics of the wings are given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. II - Lap Joints, 2, Lap Joints

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. II - Lap Joints, 2, Lap Joints

Date: February 1, 1938
Creator: Hood, Manley J.
Description: Tests have been made in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel of the drag caused by four types of lap joint. The tests were made on an airfoil of NACA 23012 section and 5-foot chord and covered in a range of speeds from 80 to 500 miles per hour and lift coefficients from 0 to 0.30. The increases in profile drag caused by representative arrangements of laps varied from 4 to 9%. When there were protruding rivet heads on the surface, the addition of laps increased the drag only slightly. Laps on the forward part of a wing increased the drag considerably more than those farther back.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of Three Exit-Area Control Devices on an N.A.C.A. Cowling, Special Report

Comparison of Three Exit-Area Control Devices on an N.A.C.A. Cowling, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1940
Creator: McHugh, James G.
Description: Adjustable cowling flaps, an adjustable-length cowling skirt, and a bottom opening with adjustable flap were tested as means of controlling the rate of cooling-air flow through an air-cooled radial-engine cowling. The devices were tested in the NACA 20-foot tunnel on a model wing-nacelle-propeller combination, through an airspeed range of 20 to 80 miles per hour, and with the propeller blade angle set 23 degrees at 0.75 of the tip radius. The resistance of the engine to air flow through the cowling was simulated by a perforated plate. The results indicated that the adjustable cowling flap and the bottom opening with adjustable flap were about equally effective on the basis of pressure drop obtainable and that both were more effective means of increasing the pressure drop through the cowling than the adjustable-length skirt. At conditions of equal cooling-air flow, the net efficiency obtained with the adjustable cowling flaps and the adjustable-length cowling skirt was about 1% greater than the net efficiency obtained with the bottom opening with adjustable flap.
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Notes on New French Commercial Airplanes

Notes on New French Commercial Airplanes

Date: April 4, 1935
Creator: unknown
Description: This document discusses the types of commercial planes ordered by Air France. Characteristics of the Wibault 670, the Dewoitine D.620, Bloch 300, and the Potez 620 airplanes are included. Pictures and diagrams of these aircraft are also included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Estimated Effect of Ring Cowl on the Climb and Ceiling of an Airplane, Special Report

Estimated Effect of Ring Cowl on the Climb and Ceiling of an Airplane, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1931
Creator: Louden, F. A.
Description: Although the application of a ring cowl to an airplane with an air-cooled engine increases the maximum L/D and the high speed to an appreciable extent, the performance in climb and ceiling is not increased as much as one would expect without analyzing the conditions. When a ring cowl is installed on an airplane, the propeller is set at a higher pitch to allow the engine to turn its rated r.p.m. at the increased high speed. V/nD is increased and the propeller efficiency at high speed is increased slightly. The ratio of r.p.m. at climbing speed, V(sub c) , to the r.p.m. at maximum speed, V (sub m) is dependent upon the ratio of V(sub c) to V(sub m). The increase in V(sub c) for all airplane with ring cowl i s not as great as the increase in V(sub m), so that the ratio V(sub c)/V(sub m) is less than for the airplane without ring. Consequently the r.p.m. and full throttle thrust power available are less at V(sub c) for the airplane with ring cowl and in spite of the increase in L/D due to the installation of the ring, the excess thrust power available for climbing is not ...
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Definition of Method of Measurement of Supporting and Control Surface Areas, Special Report

Definition of Method of Measurement of Supporting and Control Surface Areas, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1931
Creator: unknown
Description: Definitions of methods of measurements of supporting and control surface areas are presented. Methods for measuring the supporting surface, i.e., the wing area, and the control surfaces, i.e., the horizontal tail area, the vertical tail area, and the trailing control surface areas are defined. Illustrations of each of the areas are included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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