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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: Farmers' bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture)
Diseases of Watermelons

Diseases of Watermelons

Date: 1922
Creator: Orton, W. A. (William Allen), 1877-1930 & Meier, F. C.
Description: This bulletin discusses diseases which commonly afflict watermelons, including wilt, root-knot, gummy stem blight, ground-rot, anthracnose, stem-end rot, and diseases which primarily develop during transport to markets. Disease control measures are also discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Chinch Bug and Its Control

The Chinch Bug and Its Control

Date: 1922
Creator: Horton, J. R. & Satterthwait, A. F.
Description: This bulletin discusses the chinch bug, an insect which destroys corn, wheat, oats, and forage sorghums in the United States. The chinch bug's life cycle and habits are discussed as well as conditions favorable to chinch bug outbreads and control measures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Hard Red Winter Wheats

The Hard Red Winter Wheats

Date: 1922
Creator: Clark, J. Allen (Jacob Allen), b. 1888 & Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893-
Description: This bulletin discusses the classes and varieties of hard red winter wheats and the areas in which they are successfully grown. Among the varieties discussed are Turkey, Kharkof, Kanred, Blackhull, Minturki, and Baeska.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An Improved Method of Making Sugar-Beet Sirup

An Improved Method of Making Sugar-Beet Sirup

Date: 1921
Creator: Townsend, C. O. & Sherwood, S. F.
Description: "This bulletin tells how to grow sugar beets in the garden and describes a simple process of making from them a palatable and nutritious table sirup with a pleasant flavor. A patent for the process of making the sirup has been issued for the benefit of the public, so that anyone is free to use it. Tests have proved the process to be practicable. Sugar beets may be grown in any locality which has tillable soil that is capable of producing good crops of vegetables. A small piece of ground is sufficient for planting a few rows of beets -- enough to furnish the family with sirup. The tools needed are necessary in any garden operation -- a spade, a hoe, and a rake. All mature sugar beets, if properly handled, will produce a sirup. The beets are cleaned, peeled, cut into thin slices, and soaked in hot water to extract the sugar. The liquid is then treated and boiled down to the thickness desired. Detailed directions are given in the following pages." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Red-Necked Raspberry Cane-Borer

The Red-Necked Raspberry Cane-Borer

Date: 1922
Creator: Chittenden, F. H. (Frank Hurlbut), 1858-1929
Description: "A 'flat-headed,' milk-white borer, the larva or young of a small, slender, black beetle with bronze-red head and coppery red or golden thorax ('neck'), causes a reduction in the crops of raspberry, blackberry, and dewberry in the eastern half of the United States by its injury to the canes. The beetle, also, does some injury by feeding on the leaves of the plants. This insect may be controlled by cutting out the infested canes in the fall or winter, or in early spring before the beetles have emerged from them, and promptly burning the cuttings. Cooperation in the observance of this measure, including the same precautions on wild plants, for successive years, is highly desirable." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Green Manuring

Green Manuring

Date: 1922
Creator: Piper, Charles V. (Charles Vancouver), 1867-1926 & Pieters, A. J.
Description: "Green manuring means turning under suitable crops to enrich the soil. Such crops may be turned under green or when ripe. Green manuring adds organic matter and, directly or indirectly, nitrogen to the soil. Leguminous crops are most desirable for green manuring, since they add to the soil nitrogen gathered from the air in addition to the organic matter which they carry. Besides the nitrogen in the legumes turned under, an additional supply of nitrogen is fixed in the soil by the action of bacteria, using the carbon in the organic matter as a source of energy. Turning under an entire crop is advised only when the soil is poor and for the purpose of starting a rotation. Turning under catch crops or winter-grown green crops is an economical and successful method of supplying nitrogen." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Take-All of Wheat and Its Control

Take-All of Wheat and Its Control

Date: 1921
Creator: Humphrey, H. B. (Harry Baker), 1873-1955; Johnson, Aaron G. & McKinney, Harold H.
Description: This bulletin discusses take-all, a fungal disease of wheat, and methods for controlling it. It also describes the distribution, symptoms, and causes of take-all.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Methods of Poultry Management at the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station

Methods of Poultry Management at the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station

Date: 1909
Creator: Pearl, Raymond, 1879-1940
Description: This bulletin discusses the methods of poultry management employed at the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Maine Agricultural Experiment Station. It contains recommendations for breeding, natural and artificial incubation, feeding practices, and sheltering.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Standard Varieties of Chickens: III. The Asiatic, English, and French Classes

Standard Varieties of Chickens: III. The Asiatic, English, and French Classes

Date: 1919
Creator: Slocum, Rob R. (Rob Roy), 1883-1944
Description: "The breeds of chickens included in the Asiatic, English, and French classes are in the main of a relatively large size, and have been developed primarily as meat breeds. They are not so commonly kept in this country [the United States] as either the general-purpose or the egg breeds. The best-known meat breeds in the United States are those of the Asiatic class. However, the breeds of the English and French classes, while averaging somewhat smaller in size than those of the Asiatic class, were developed for their table qualities and therefore are popularly grouped among the meat breeds. In the opinion of many persons the Sussex and Orpington breeds, both English, are general-purpose breeds. The Orpington, in particular, is a fairly common and popular farm fowl in the United States. The best-known section of the United States in which large table fowls of superior quality are produced in considerable quantities is the South Shore distrct of Massachusetts, near Boston. The chicks are hatched in the fall or early winter, and both males and females are grown to a good size and marketed as South Shore roasters. The males usually are caponized, but are marketed as roasters rather than capons, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Standard Varieties of Chickens: III. The Asiatic, English, and French Classes

Standard Varieties of Chickens: III. The Asiatic, English, and French Classes

Date: 1921
Creator: Slocum, Rob R. (Rob Roy), 1883-1944
Description: Revised edition. "The breeds of chickens included in the Asiatic, English, and French classes are in the main of a relatively large size, and have been developed primarily as meat breeds. They are not so commonly kept in this country [the United States] as either the general-purpose or the egg breeds. The best-known meat breeds in the United States are those of the Asiatic class. However, the breeds of the English and French classes, while averaging somewhat smaller in size than those of the Asiatic class, were developed for their table qualities and therefore are popularly grouped among the meat breeds. In the opinion of many persons the Sussex and Orpington breeds, both English, are general-purpose breeds. The Orpington, in particular, is a fairly common and popular farm fowl in the United States. The best-known section of the United States in which large table fowls of superior quality are produced in considerable quantities is the South Shore distrct of Massachusetts, near Boston. The chicks are hatched in the fall or early winter, and both males and females are grown to a good size and marketed as South Shore roasters. The males usually are caponized, but are marketed as roasters rather ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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