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User`s manual for the radioactive decay and accumulation code RADAC

User`s manual for the radioactive decay and accumulation code RADAC

Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L. & Ashline, R.C.
Description: The RADAC computer code calculates radioactive decay and accumulation of decayed products using an algorithm based on the direct use of the Bateman equations and referred to here as the yield factor method. This report explains the yield factor method, gives an overview of the various modules in the RADAC code system, and describes the decay and accumulation code in detail. The RADAC code has capacity for two waste types and can accommodate up to 60 years of annual waste inputs. Decay times as high as 1 million years can be calculated. The user supplies the undecayed composition and radioactivity of the waste placed in storage each year. The code calculates the decayed composition, radioactivity, and thermal power of the accumulated waste at the end of each year and gives the results in terms of grams and curies of individual radionuclides. Calculations can be made for up to 19 waste storage sites in a single run. For each site and each waste type, calculations can be made by 1-year steps up to 60 years, by 10-year steps to 160 years, and by 6 discrete steps to 1 million years. Detailed outputs can be printed for each waste site and each ...
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Stratigraphic data for wells at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

Stratigraphic data for wells at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Anderson, S.R.; Ackerman, D.J.; Liszewski, M.J. & Frieburger, R.M.
Description: A stratigraphic data base containing 230 stratigraphic units in 333 wells was constructed for deposits that make up the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near INEL in eastern Idaho. Stratigraphic units, which were identified and correlated using data from numerous outcrops, 26 continuous cores, and 328 natural-gamma logs available in Dec. 1993, include 121 basalt-flow groups, 102 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 1 rhyolite dome. By volume, basalt flows make up about 90% of the deposits underlying most of this 890 mi{sup 2} area. Basalt, sediment, andesite, and rhyolite were identified from outcrops and cores that were selectively evaluated. Stratigraphic units were correlated using these data and natural-gamma logs. Best correlations were for basalt and sediment at Test Area North, the Naval Reactors Area, the Test Reactor Area, ICPP, and the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), where most cores and 2/3 of the logs were obtained. Correlations range from good at the RWMC to uncertain the eastern half of the study area. A computer diskette containing the data is included.
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Evaluation of a non-cyanide gold plating process for switch tubes

Evaluation of a non-cyanide gold plating process for switch tubes

Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Norwood, D.P. & Martinez, F.E.
Description: Switch tubes are used in nuclear weapon firing sets and are required to be reliable and impervious to gas permeation for many years. To accomplish this, a gold plated coating of approximately 25 microns is required over all metal surfaces on the tube exterior. The gold has historically been plated using gold cyanide plating chemistry. In this work we proposed to replace the cyanide plating bath with an environmentally friendlier sulfite gold plating bath. Low and high pH sulfite plating chemistries were investigated as possible replacements for the cyanide gold plating chemistry. The low pH plating chemistry demonstrated a gold plated coating which met the high purity, grain size, and hardness requirements for switch tubes. The high pH chemistry was rejected primarily because the hardness of the gold plated coatings was too high and exceeded switch tube coating requirements. A problem with nodule formation on the gold plated surface using the low pH chemistry had to be resolved during this evaluation. The nodule formation was postulated to be produced by generation of SO{sub 2} in the low pH bath causing gold to be precipitated out when the sulfite concentration falls below a minimum level. The problem was resolved by maintaining ...
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Formulation and make-up of simulate dilute water, low ionic content aqueous solution

Formulation and make-up of simulate dilute water, low ionic content aqueous solution

Date: April 4, 1997
Creator: Gdowski, G.
Description: This procedure describes the formulation and make-up of Simulated Dilute Water (SOW), a low-ionic-content water to be used for Activity E-20-50, Long-Term Corrosion Studies. This water has an ionic content which is nominally a factor of ten higher than that of representative waters at or near Yucca Mountain. Representative waters were chosen as J-13 well water [Harrar, 1990] and perched water at Yucca Mountain [Glassley, 1996]. J-13 well water is obtained from ground water that is in contact with the Topopah Spring tuff, which is the repository horizon rock. The perched water is located in the Topopah Spring tuff, but below the repository horizon and above the water table. A nominal times ten higher ionic content was chosen to simulate the effect of ionic concentrating due to elevated temperature water flowing through fractures where salts and minerals have been deposited due to evaporation and boiling.
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ORNL contribution to the IAEA bcnchmark problem on fission reactor decommissioning

ORNL contribution to the IAEA bcnchmark problem on fission reactor decommissioning

Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Broadhead, B.L. & Childs, R.L.
Description: Recently the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) selected a benchmark problem for calculation of radioactivity inventories and dose estimates necessary for fission reactor decommissioning. Several researchers were invited to participate in the solution of this benchmark problem set. The contribution from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is presented in this paper.
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Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A. & Arasteh, D.
Description: Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic ...
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Assessment of mercury in the Savannah River Site environment

Assessment of mercury in the Savannah River Site environment

Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Kvartek, E.J.; Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.; Eldridge, L. & Newman, M.C.
Description: Mercury has been valued by humans for several millennia. Its principal ore, cinnabar, was mined for its distinctive reddish-gold color and high density. Mercury and its salts were used as medicines and aphrodisiacs. At SRS, mercury originated from one of the following: as a processing aid in aluminum dissolution and chloride precipitation; as part of the tritium facilities` gas handling system; from experimental, laboratory, or process support facilities; and as a waste from site operations. Mercury is also found in Par Pond and some SRS streams as the result of discharges from a mercury-cell-type chlor-alkali plant near the city of Augusta, GA. Reactor cooling water, drawn from the Savannah River, transported mercury onto the SRS. Approximately 80,000 kg of mercury is contained in the high level waste tanks and 10,000 kg is located in the SWDF. Additional quantities are located in the various seepage basins. In 1992, 617 wells were monitored for mercury contamination, with 47 indicating contamination in excess of the 0.002-ppm EPA Primary Drinking Water Standard. More than 20 Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) reports and publications pertinent to mercury (Hg) have been generated during the last two decades. They are divided into three groupings: SRS-specific studies, basic ...
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Applications of RQMD to Bose-Einstein correlations

Applications of RQMD to Bose-Einstein correlations

Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Sullivan, J.P.
Description: Source size parameters measured via two-particle interferometry in experiment NA44 for 200 GeV/nucleon S+Pb collisions are compared to calculations using the RQMD event generator. Reasonable agreement is found in most cases. Based on this agreement, the model is used to study some of the interesting details of the collision dynamics which are not easily measured. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.
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Measurements of laser imprint by XUV radiography using an x-ray laser

Measurements of laser imprint by XUV radiography using an x-ray laser

Date: May 30, 1996
Creator: Kalantar, D.H.; DaSilva, L.B. & Glendinning, S.
Description: We have developed a technique for studying the imprint of a laser beam on a thin foil using an x-ray laser as an XUV backlighter and XUV multilayer optics. This technique allows us to measure small fractional variations in the foil thickness due to hydrodynamics imprinted by direct laser irradiation. We present results of imprinted modulation and growth due to a low intensity 0.53 {mu}m drive beam incident on a 2 {mu}m Al foil using a germanium x-ray laser at the Vulcan facility. We present measurements of the modulation due to static RPP, SSD smoothed, and ISI smoothed speckle patterns at 0.53 {mu}m irradiation.
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Validation of nuclear criticality safety software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Revision 1

Validation of nuclear criticality safety software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Revision 1

Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Lee, B.L. Jr. & D`Aquila, D.M.
Description: The original validation report, POEF-T-3636, was documented in August 1994. The document was based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This revision is written to clarify the margin of safety being used at Portsmouth for nuclear criticality safety calculations. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Lockheed Martin Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. For calculations of Portsmouth systems using the specified codes and systems covered by this validation, a maximum k{sub eff} including 2{sigma} of 0.9605 or lower shall be considered as subcritical to ensure a calculational margin of safety of 0.02. The validation ...
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