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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Resource Type: Pamphlet
Geothermal Energy & Our Environment

Geothermal Energy & Our Environment

Date: 1980?
Creator: unknown
Description: A pamphlet on the impact of geothermal energy on the environment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Austin, Texas: Solar in Action [Brochure]

Austin, Texas: Solar in Action [Brochure]

Date: October 1, 2011
Creator: unknown
Description: This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Austin, Texas, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ahorro Energia: Consejos Sobre Como Ahorrar Dinero y Energia en su Casa [Brochure]

Ahorro Energia: Consejos Sobre Como Ahorrar Dinero y Energia en su Casa [Brochure]

Date: July 1, 2012
Creator: unknown
Description: The Spanish-language version of U.S. Department of Energy's consumer guide to saving energy and money at home and on the road.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results

Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results

Date: July 1, 2013
Creator: unknown
Description: The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Your Government and the Indian

Your Government and the Indian

Date: 1961
Creator: unknown
Description: Pamphlet describing the citizenship, education, and legal rights of American Indians.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
What Libraries Learned from the War.

What Libraries Learned from the War.

Date: January 1922
Creator: Milam, Carl Hastings, 1884-1963
Description: Pamphlet containing lessons learned by librarians during their service in World War I. Topics covered include how men were not influenced by books or libraries, that libraries must be organized, and that libraries could be used to foster the understanding of world problems.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Brief History of Measurement Systems: with a Chart of the Modernized Metric System

Brief History of Measurement Systems: with a Chart of the Modernized Metric System

Date: August 1976
Creator: United States. National Bureau of Standards.
Description: Pamphlet issued by the United States National Bureau of Standards providing an overview of the English system of measurement used in the United States and of the metric system. The internal pages of the pamphlet contain a chart labeled "The Modernized Metric System" which includes tables of common conversions and a chart of the seven base units: meter/length, kilogram/mass, second/time, ampere/electric current, kelvin/temperature, mole/amount of substance, and candela/luminous intensity, as well as two supplementary units: radian/plane angle and steradian/solid angle. There is also a graphic representation of yards versus meters in ruler form at the bottom.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Some References on Metric Information, Including a Chart on All You Need to Know About Metric

Some References on Metric Information, Including a Chart on All You Need to Know About Metric

Date: January 1977
Creator: United States. National Bureau of Standards.
Description: Pamphlet issued by the United States National Bureau of Standards containing a list of government pamphlets, reports, and other resources related to the metric system of measurement. It includes a form for ordering materials from the Government Printing Office as well as an illustrated description of everyday conversions for weight, volume, length, and temperature.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
What About Metric?

What About Metric?

Date: October 1976
Creator: Barbrow, Louis E. & Halpin, Suellen
Description: Pamphlet issued by the United States National Bureau of Standards discussing the reasons that the U.S. decided passed the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and provides tables, illustrations, and formulas for converting between customary units and metric units of measuring weight, length, volume, and temperature. It also includes a discussion of how one might expect to use metric measurements in the marketplace, in the home, and at work.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
America Joins a Metric World

America Joins a Metric World

Date: February 1976
Creator: United States. National Bureau of Standards.
Description: Pamphlet issued by the United States National Bureau of Standards discussing the Metric Conversion Act of 1975, the work of the U.S. Metric Board, and how government agencies are facilitating a switch to the metric system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Frost and the Prevention of Damage by It

Frost and the Prevention of Damage by It

Date: 1920
Creator: United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
Description: "All frost protection methods, from the simplest to the most complicated, can be carried on more successfully if the processes by which the earth's surface cools at night and the factors which influence the rate of cooling are well understood. In the first part of this bulletin an attempt has been made to describe in a simple, elementary manner the changes that take place at and near the earth's surface on a frosty night, so that persons protecting plants or trees may be able to understand how their protective devices operate to prevent damage and in what manner they are most efficient. In treating a matter of this kind it is practically impossible to eliminate all technical terms, but so far as possible these have been carefully explained in simple language. The larger portion is given over to a discussion of the various methods and devices now being used for protection against frost, together with a chapter on temperatures injurious to plants, blossoms, and fruit." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Brucellosis of Cattle (Bang's Disease, Infectious Abortion)

Brucellosis of Cattle (Bang's Disease, Infectious Abortion)

Date: 1941
Creator: Eichhorn, A. & Crawford, A. B.
Description: This bulletin discusses the infectious disease common in cattle called brucellosis (also known as Bang's disease), which causes abortion. The causes, symptoms, and diagnosis of the disease are discussed as well as various treatments, prevention and control measures, and attempts at eradication.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cost of Using Horses on Corn-Belt Farms

Cost of Using Horses on Corn-Belt Farms

Date: 1922
Creator: Cooper, M. R. (Martin Reese), b. 1887 & Williams, J. O.
Description: "The purpose of this bulletin is to present information on the cost of using horses in the Corn Belt that will acquaint the farmer with the extent of this yearly expense and suggest methods by which this time may be reduced on many farms." -- p. 1.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Corn Earworm As an Enemy of Vetch

The Corn Earworm As an Enemy of Vetch

Date: 1921
Creator: Luginbill, Philip & Beyer, A. H. (Adolph Harvey), b. 1882
Description: "Vetch, which has become an important forage crop throughout the Southeastern States, needs protection from the same insect that works such havoc on corn and cotton. This corn earworm, or cotton bollworm, is the most serious pest that growers of vetch have to combat. The caterpillars eat both the foliage and the seed pods, and, if the infestation is heavy, make the crop practically worthless. Vetch intended for a hay crop generally escapes serious injury, as it is cut before the caterpillars are large enough to do much damage. It is recommended that a crop intended for seed be carefully watched and if the insects become numerous an insecticide be applied at once or the vetch cut for hay. Spraying, dusting, the use of poisoned-bran bait, and other control measures are discussed and summarized in this bulletin." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Green Manuring

Green Manuring

Date: 1922
Creator: Piper, Charles V. (Charles Vancouver), 1867-1926 & Pieters, A. J.
Description: "Green manuring means turning under suitable crops to enrich the soil. Such crops may be turned under green or when ripe. Green manuring adds organic matter and, directly or indirectly, nitrogen to the soil. Leguminous crops are most desirable for green manuring, since they add to the soil nitrogen gathered from the air in addition to the organic matter which they carry. Besides the nitrogen in the legumes turned under, an additional supply of nitrogen is fixed in the soil by the action of bacteria, using the carbon in the organic matter as a source of energy. Turning under an entire crop is advised only when the soil is poor and for the purpose of starting a rotation. Turning under catch crops or winter-grown green crops is an economical and successful method of supplying nitrogen." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Grasshoppers and Their Control

Grasshoppers and Their Control

Date: 1939
Creator: Parker, J. R.
Description: "Grasshoppers in a single year have destroyed crops valued at over a hundred million dollars. The best way to prevent losses is the use of poisoned bait supplemented by tillage and seeding methods which restrict egg laying and imprison the young grasshoppers in the ground after they hatch. Bait is most effective while grasshoppers are still on their hatching grounds or massed along field margins. It should be put out when grasshoppers are doing their first feeding of the day. This usually occurs between 6 and 10 a.m. at temperatures of 70° to 80°F. Bait should not be spread unless grasshoppers are actively feeding. In mixing and distributing the poisoned bait care should be taken to prevent injury to persons and farm animals. Seeding grain only on plowed or summer-fallowed ground and plowing infested stubble before the eggs hatch greatly reduces the quantity of bait needed for control and decreases the liability of crop injury. Cooperation in the use of control methods by all the farmers in a community is necessary for best results." -- p. i
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
How Insects Affect the Rice Crop

How Insects Affect the Rice Crop

Date: 1920
Creator: Webb, J. L. (Jesse Lee), 1878-1942
Description: This pamphlet discusses insects that damage rice crops: "The slender, milk-white grub or 'maggot' of the rice water-weevil lives on the roots of rice, and whether it feeds little or much upon them, kills practically all the roots that it attacks. This pruning of the roots weakens the rice plant and often kills it. Another enemy of this staple crop of the South is the stink bug, which sucks the juices from the soft grains of rice. The fall army worm, when it becomes abundant, works great havoc in its attack upon young rice. Other insects also, such as the rice stalk-borer, infest the rice field, and the rice planter must constantly guard his crop against them. This bulletin tells when to plant, and when to flood and drain the fields in order to reduce the numbers of these pests, and recommends other measures that will prevent attack by the many minor species of insects which normally breed in and near rice fields." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Dusting Machinery for Cotton Boll Weevil Control

Dusting Machinery for Cotton Boll Weevil Control

Date: 1920
Creator: Johnson, Elmer & Coad, B. R.
Description: "This bulletin is intended to aid the prospective purchaser of dusting machinery for cotton boll weevil control in selecting a satisfactory model and one adapted to the needs of his particular farming conditions. Different localities frequently require different types of machinery, and the farmer should make sure he is securing one suitable for his needs." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Date: 1939
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-
Description: "This bulletin briefly traces the circumstances which have created the soil problems in the southern Great Plains and shows how the hand of man has hastened present troubles. But it goes further and deals with the methods now being used to solve the problem on nature's own terms." -- p. 2-3. Some of the solutions discussed include contour farming, terraces, water conservation techniques, crop lines, and revegetation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Culture and Pests of Field Peas

Culture and Pests of Field Peas

Date: 1938
Creator: McKee, Roland & Schoth, H. A. (Harry August), b. 1891
Description: This bulletin discusses the culture of the field and diseases and insects which commonly afflict it. Diseases discussed include leaf spot, stem blight, bacterial blight, left blotch, powdery mildew, downy mildew, anthracnose, fusarium wilt, root rot, and mosaic. The pea weevil, aphid, and moth are the insects discussed, as well as the nematode.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Hotbeds and Coldframes

Hotbeds and Coldframes

Date: 1935
Creator: W. R. (William Renwick) Beattie, b. 1870
Description: This bulletin describes the uses of hotbeds and coldframes in starting early plants. The hotbeds discussed include manure hotbeds, fuel-heated beds, and electric heating in beds and greenhouses. Coverings and care and maintenance are also discussed. Possible plants for early growth include tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, squashes, cucumbers, muskmelons, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and celery.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Diseases of Watermelons

Diseases of Watermelons

Date: 1922
Creator: Orton, W. A. (William Allen), 1877-1930 & Meier, F. C.
Description: This bulletin discusses diseases which commonly afflict watermelons, including wilt, root-knot, gummy stem blight, ground-rot, anthracnose, stem-end rot, and diseases which primarily develop during transport to markets. Disease control measures are also discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Hessian Fly and How to Prevent Losses from It

The Hessian Fly and How to Prevent Losses from It

Date: 1920
Creator: Walton, William Randolph, 1873-1952
Description: "The Hessian fly undoubtedly is the most injurious insect enemy of wheat in the United States. During the last 37 years at least seven general outbreaks of this pest have occurred in the States east of the Mississippi River. These invasions have averaged about one every five years, although they have occurred at rather irregular intervals. The last one was very destructive and was at its height during the period from 1914 to 1916.... A large proportion of such losses is preventable, although no remedy is known which will destroy the pest or save the crop once it has become thoroughly infested. Control and preventive measures are described on page 13 and summarized on page 16." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Hard Red Winter Wheats

The Hard Red Winter Wheats

Date: 1922
Creator: Clark, J. Allen (Jacob Allen), b. 1888 & Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893-
Description: This bulletin discusses the classes and varieties of hard red winter wheats and the areas in which they are successfully grown. Among the varieties discussed are Turkey, Kharkof, Kanred, Blackhull, Minturki, and Baeska.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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