You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Resource Type: Text
Secondary succession, community assembly and restoration in grasslands and savannas.

Secondary succession, community assembly and restoration in grasslands and savannas.

Date: February 1, 2010
Creator: Foster, Bryan, L. & Aschenbach, Todd
Description: A final report made to the US Forest Service that addresses savannah restoration research findings from research conducted at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

Date: December 1, 2009
Creator: Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R. & Rondorf, Neil, E.
Description: On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Responses of upland herpetofauna to the restoration of Carolina Bays and thinning of forested Bay Margins.

Responses of upland herpetofauna to the restoration of Carolina Bays and thinning of forested Bay Margins.

Date: May 1, 2008
Creator: Ledvina, Joseph A.
Description: Research on the effects of wetland restoration on reptiles and amphibians is becoming more common, but almost all of these studies have observed the colonization of recently disturbed habitats that were completely dry at the time of restoration. In a similar manner, investigations herpetofaunal responses to forest management have focused on clearcuts, and less intensive stand manipulations are not as well studied. To evaluate community and population responses of reptiles and amphibians to hydrology restoration and canopy removal in the interior of previously degraded Carolina bays, I monitored herpetofauna in the uplands adjacent to six historically degraded Carolina bays at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for four years after restoration. To evaluate the effects of forest thinning on upland herpetofauna, forests were thinned in the margins of three of these bays. I used repeated measures ANOVA to compare species richness and diversity and the abundance of selected species and guilds between these bays and with those at three reference bays that were not historically drained and three control bays that remained degraded. I also used Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) to look for community-level patterns based treatments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.

Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.

Date: April 1, 2009
Creator: Davis, Justin, Charles
Description: Abstract -The majority of studies investigating the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to forest- floor vertebrates have taken place in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountains, while comparative studies in the southeastern Coastal Plain are lacking. My study was a continuation of a long-term project investigating the importance of CWD as a habitat component for shrew and herpetofaunal communities within managed pine stands in the southeastern Coastal Plain. Results suggest that addition of CWD can increase abundance of southeastern and southern short-tailed shrews. However, downed wood does not appear to be a critical habitat component for amphibians and reptiles. Rising petroleum costs and advances in wood utilization technology have resulted in an emerging biofuels market with potential to decrease CWD volumes left in forests following timber harvests. Therefore, forest managers must understand the value of CWD as an ecosystem component to maintain economically productive forests while conserving biological diversity.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications

A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications

Date: March 1, 2011
Creator: Misra, Vishal
Description: This is the final project report of award "A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications", given by DOE in 2003 to Vishal Misra at Columbia University.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Metabolomic Functional Analysis of Bacterial Genomes: Final Report

Metabolomic Functional Analysis of Bacterial Genomes: Final Report

Date: January 1, 2008
Creator: Sayavedra-Soto, Daniel J. Arp Luis A.
Description: The availability of the complete DNA sequence of the bacterial genome of Nitrosomonas europaea offered the opportunity for unprecedented and detailed investigations of function. We studied the function of genes involved in carbohydrate and Fe metabolism. N. europaea has genes for the synthesis and degradation of glycogen and sucrose but cannot grow on substrates other than ammonia and CO2. Granules of glycogen were detected in whole cells by electron microscopy and quantified in cell-free extracts by enzymatic methods. The cellular glycogen and sucrose content varied depending on the composition of the growth medium and cellular growth stage. N. europaea also depends heavily on iron for metabolism of ammonia, is particularly interesting since it lacks genes for siderophore production, and has genes with only low similarity to known iron reductases, yet grows relatively well in medium containing low Fe. By comparing the transcriptomes of cells grown in iron-replete medium versus iron-limited medium, 247 genes were identified as differentially expressed. Mutant strains deficient in genes for sucrose, glycogen and iron metabolism were created and are being used to further our understanding of ammonia oxidizing bacteria.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
State Research, Outreach, and Technical Assistance to Imrove the Nation's Transmission & Distribution System

State Research, Outreach, and Technical Assistance to Imrove the Nation's Transmission & Distribution System

Date: May 20, 2009
Creator: Fox, J.; Keogh, M. & Spahn, A.
Description: The broad purpose of this project was to work cooperatively with the DOE to explore technology nad policy issues associated with more efficient, reliable, and affordable electric transmission and distribution use.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

Date: March 31, 2009
Creator: Eyring, Edward & Konya, Gabor
Description: One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Doing Business with the Federal Government (Fact Sheet)

Doing Business with the Federal Government (Fact Sheet)

Date: June 1, 2009
Creator: unknown
Description: To do business with the Federal Government, it is best to target the appropriate program. This document outlines resources for doing business with the Federal Government.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Enhancing Condensers for Geothermal Systems: the Effect of High Contact Angles on Dropwise Condensation Heat Transfer

Enhancing Condensers for Geothermal Systems: the Effect of High Contact Angles on Dropwise Condensation Heat Transfer

Date: October 6, 2009
Creator: Kennedy, John M.; Kim, Sunwoo & Kim, Kwang J.
Description: Phase change heat transfer is notorious for increasing the irreversibility of, and therefore decreasing the efficiency of, geothermal power plants. Its significant contribution to the overall irreversibility of the plant makes it the most important source of inefficiency in the process. Recent studies here have shown the promotion of drop wise condensation in the lab by means of increasing the surface energy density of a tube with nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology has allowed the creation of surface treatments which discourage water from wetting a tube surface during a static test. These surface treatments are unique in that they create high- contact angles on the condensing tube surfaces to promote drop wise condensation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Ohio River Valley CO2 Storage Project AEP Mountaineer Plant, West Virginia Numerical Simulation and Risk Assessment Report

The Ohio River Valley CO2 Storage Project AEP Mountaineer Plant, West Virginia Numerical Simulation and Risk Assessment Report

Date: March 31, 2008
Creator: Gupta, Neeraj
Description: A series of numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection were conducted as part of a program to assess the potential for geologic sequestration in deep geologic reservoirs (the Rose Run and Copper Ridge formations), at the American Electric Power (AEP) Mountaineer Power Plant outside of New Haven, West Virginia. The simulations were executed using the H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl operational mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator (White and Oostrom, 2006). The objective of the Rose Run formation modeling was to predict CO{sub 2} injection rates using data from the core analysis conducted on the samples. A systematic screening procedure was applied to the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage site utilizing the Features, Elements, and Processes (FEP) database for geological storage of CO{sub 2} (Savage et al., 2004). The objective of the screening was to identify potential risk categories for the long-term geological storage of CO{sub 2} at the Mountaineer Power Plant in New Haven, West Virginia. Over 130 FEPs in seven main classes were assessed for the project based on site characterization information gathered in a geological background study, testing in a deep well drilled on the site, and general site conditions. In evaluating ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

Date: December 1, 2009
Creator: McGrail, B. P.; Sullivan, E. C.; Spane, F. A.; Bacon, D. H.; Hund, G.; Thorne, P. D. et al.
Description: The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
LLE Review 116 (July-September 2008)

LLE Review 116 (July-September 2008)

Date: March 12, 2010
Creator: Marozas, J.A., editor
Description: This issue has the following articles: (1) Optimizing Electron-Positron Pair Production on kJ-Class High-Intensity Lasers for the Purpose of Pair-Plasma Creation; (2) Neutron Yield Study of Direct-Drive, Low-Adiabat Cryogenic D2 Implosions on OMEGA; (3) Al 1s-2p Absorption Spectroscopy of Shock-Wave Heating and Compression in Laser-Driven Planar Foil; (4) A Measurable Lawson Criterion and Hydro-Equivalent Curves for Inertial Confinement Fusion; (5) Pulsed-THz Characterization of Hg-Based, High-Temperature Superconductors; (6) LLE's Summer High School Research Program; (7) FY08 Laser Facility Report; and (8) National Laser Users Facility and External Users Programs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
LLE Review 117 (October-December 2008)

LLE Review 117 (October-December 2008)

Date: May 28, 2009
Creator: Bittle, W., editor
Description: This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2008, features 'Demonstration of the Shock-Timing Technique for Ignition Targets at the National Ignition Facility' by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, J. A. Marozas, T. C. Sangster, D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE), D. Munro, P. M. Celliers, D. G. Hicks, G. W. Collins, H. F. Robey, O. L. Landen (LLNL), and R. E. Olson (SNL). In this article (p. 1) the authors report on a technique to measure the velocity and timing of shock waves in a capsule contained within hohlraum targets. This technique is critical for optimizing the drive profiles for high-performance inertial-confinement-fusion capsules, which are compressed by multiple precisely timed shock waves. The shock-timing technique was demonstrated on OMEGA using surrogate hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV and fitted with a re-entrant cone and quartz window to facilitate velocity measurements using velocity interferometry. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were also used to validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
LLE Review 118 (January-March 2009)

LLE Review 118 (January-March 2009)

Date: August 3, 2009
Creator: Bittle, W., editor
Description: This issue has the following articles: (1) Applied Plasma Spectroscopy: Laser-Fusion Experiments; (2) Relativistic Electron-Beam Transport Studies Using High-Resolution, Coherent Transition Radiation Imaging; (3) Pressure-Driven, Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Interchange Instabilities in Laser-Produced, High-Energy-Density Plasmas; (4) Extended Model for Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flake Reorientation and Relaxation; (5) Modeling the Effects of Microencapsulation on the Electro-Optic Behavior of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flakes; (6) Capillarity and Dielectrophoresis of Liquid Deuterium; and (7) A Stable Mid-IR, GaSb-Based Diode Laser Source for Cryogenic Target Layering at the OMEGA Laser Facility.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
LLE Review 119 (April-June 2009)

LLE Review 119 (April-June 2009)

Date: October 22, 2009
Creator: Edgell, D.H., editor
Description: This issue has the following articles: (1) Shock-Ignition Experiments on OMEGA at NIF-Relevant Intensities; (2) Laser-Driven Magnetic-Flux Compression in High-Energy-Density Plasmas; (3) Lorentz Mapping of Magnetic Fields in Hot, Dense Plasmas; (4) Characterization and Optimization of Yb-Doped Photonic-Crystal Fiber Rod Amplifiers Using Spatially Resolved Spectral Interferometry; (5) Optical Differentiation and Multimillijoule {approx}150-ps Pulse Generation in a Regenerative Amplifier with a Temperature-Tuned Intracavity Volume Bragg Grating; (6) Slow Crack Growth During Radiatiave Cooling of LHG8 and BK7 Plates; and (7) Finite Element Simulation of Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photoconductor.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
LLE Review 120 (July-September 2009)

LLE Review 120 (July-September 2009)

Date: February 19, 2001
Creator: Edgell, D.H., editor
Description: This issue has the following articles: (1) The Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop; (2) The Effect of Condensates and Inner Coatings on the Performance of Vacuum Hohlraum Targets; (3) Zirconia-Coated-Carbonyl-Iron-Particle-Based Magnetorheological Fluid for Polishing Optical Glasses and Ceramics; (4) All-Fiber Optical Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Faraday Rotation in Highly Terbium Doped Fiber; (5) Femtosecond Optical Pump-Probe Characterization of High-Pressure-Grown Al{sub 0.86}Ga{sub 0.14}N Single Crystals; (6) LLE's Summer High School Research Program; (7) Laser Facility Report; and (8) National Laser Users Facility and External Users Programs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

Date: March 28, 2009
Creator: Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Heebink, Loreal; Hassett, David; Dockter, Bruce; Eylands, Kurt; Buckley, Tera et al.
Description: The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

Date: March 29, 2009
Creator: Laumb, Jason; Kay, John; Jones, Michael; Pavlish, Brandon; Lentz, Nicholas; McCollor, Donald et al.
Description: The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Institute for Multiscale Modeling of Biological Interactions

Institute for Multiscale Modeling of Biological Interactions

Date: December 26, 2009
Creator: Lenhoff, Michael E. Paulaitis Bertrand Garcia-Moreno Abraham
Description: The Institute for Multiscale Modeling of Biological Interactions (IMMBI) has two primary goals: Foster interdisciplinary collaborations among faculty and their research laboratories that will lead to novel applications of multiscale simulation and modeling methods in the biological sciences and engineering; and Building on the unique biophysical/biology-based engineering foundations of the participating faculty, train scientists and engineers to apply computational methods that collectively span multiple time and length scales of biological organization. The success of IMMBI will be defined by the following: Size and quality of the applicant pool for pre-doctoral and post-doctoral fellows; Academic performance; Quality of the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral research; Impact of the research broadly and to the DOE (ASCR program) mission; Distinction of the next career step for pre-doctoral and post-doctoral fellows; and Faculty collaborations that result from IMMBI activities. Specific details about accomplishments during the three years of DOE support for IMMBI have been documented in Annual Progress Reports (April 2005, June 2006, and March 2007) and a Report for a National Academy of Sciences Review (October 2005) that were submitted to DOE on the dates indicated. An overview of these accomplishments is provided.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Lateral Gene Transfer Among Subsurface Bacteria‭: ‬Horizontal Gene Flow in Microbial Communities‭: ‬A Special Focus issue‭, ‬Web Focus and Supplement

Lateral Gene Transfer Among Subsurface Bacteria‭: ‬Horizontal Gene Flow in Microbial Communities‭: ‬A Special Focus issue‭, ‬Web Focus and Supplement

Date: November 9, 2009
Creator: Barkay, Tamar
Description: A final report - publication of the results from a workshop held in June 2004 on Horizontal Gene Transfer in the Enviornment
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Distributed Energy Systems Integration Group (Fact Sheet)

Distributed Energy Systems Integration Group (Fact Sheet)

Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: unknown
Description: Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Distributed Energy Systems Integration Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fourth Quarter FY 2008 and Final Report

Fourth Quarter FY 2008 and Final Report

Date: February 4, 2011
Creator: Weston, Frederick
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Portable and Transparent Message Compression in MPI Libraries to Improve the Performance and Scalability of Parallel Applications

Portable and Transparent Message Compression in MPI Libraries to Improve the Performance and Scalability of Parallel Applications

Date: April 17, 2009
Creator: Albonesi, David & Burtscher, Martin
Description: The goal of this project has been to develop a lossless compression algorithm for message-passing libraries that can accelerate HPC systems by reducing the communication time. Because both compression and decompression have to be performed in software in real time, the algorithm has to be extremely fast while still delivering a good compression ratio. During the first half of this project, they designed a new compression algorithm called FPC for scientific double-precision data, made the source code available on the web, and published two papers describing its operation, the first in the proceedings of the Data Compression Conference and the second in the IEEE Transactions on Computers. At comparable average compression ratios, this algorithm compresses and decompresses 10 to 100 times faster than BZIP2, DFCM, FSD, GZIP, and PLMI on the three architectures tested. With prediction tables that fit into the CPU's L1 data acache, FPC delivers a guaranteed throughput of six gigabits per second on a 1.6 GHz Itanium 2 system. The C source code and documentation of FPC are posted on-line and have already been downloaded hundreds of times. To evaluate FPC, they gathered 13 real-world scientific datasets from around the globe, including satellite data, crash-simulation data, and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST