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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Language: English
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Supplies and production of aircraft wood

Supplies and production of aircraft wood

Date: January 1, 1920
Creator: Sparhawk, W N
Description: The purpose of this report is to present in brief form such information as is available regarding the supplies of the kinds of wood that have been used or seem likely to become important in the construction of airplanes, and the amount of lumber of each species normally put on the market each year. A general statement is given of the uses to which each kind of wood is or may be put.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nomenclature for Aeronautics

Nomenclature for Aeronautics

Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: unknown
Description: The nomenclature for aeronautics presented in this Report No. 474 is a revision of the last previous report on this subject (i.e., Report no. 240.) This report is published for the purpose of encouraging greater uniformity and precision in the use of terms relating to aeronautics, both in official documents of the Government and in commercial publications. Terms in general use in other branches of engineering have been included only where they have some special significance in aeronautics, or form an integral part of its terminology.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis for the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis for the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

Date: January 1, 1943
Creator: Gerrish, Harold C. & Meem, J. Lawrence, Jr.
Description: An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy fuel Specification No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs for the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124.
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The effect of cowling on cylinder temperatures and performance of a Wright J-5 engine

The effect of cowling on cylinder temperatures and performance of a Wright J-5 engine

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Schey, Oscar W & Biermann, Arnold E
Description: This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine the effect of different amounts and kinds of cowling on the performance and cylinder temperatures of a standard Wright J-5 engine. These tests were conducted in conjunction with drag and propeller tests in which the same cowlings were used. Four different cowlings were investigated varying from the one extreme of no cowling on the engine to the other extreme of the engine completely cowled and the cooling air flowing inside the cowling through an opening in the nose and out through an annular opening at the rear of the engine. Each cowling was tested at air speeds of approximately 60, 80, and 100 miles per hour.
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Lifting-surface-theory aspect-ratio corrections to the lift and hinge-moment parameters for full-span elevators on horizontal tail surfaces

Lifting-surface-theory aspect-ratio corrections to the lift and hinge-moment parameters for full-span elevators on horizontal tail surfaces

Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Crandall, Stewart M & Swanson, Robert S
Description: A limited number of lifting-surface-theory solutions for wings with chordwise loadings resulting from angle of attack, parabolic-ac camber, and flap deflection are now available. These solutions were studied with the purpose of determining methods of extrapolating the results in such a way that they could be used to determine lifting-surface-theory values of the aspect-ratio corrections to the lift and hinge-moment parameters for both angle-of-attack and flap-deflection-type loading that could be used to predict the characteristics of horizontal tail surfaces from section data with sufficient accuracy for engineering purposes. Such a method was devised for horizontal tail surfaces with full-span elevators. In spite of the fact that the theory involved is rather complex, the method is simple to apply and may be applied without any knowledge of lifting-surface theory. A comparison of experimental finite-span and section value and of the estimated values of the lift and hinge-moment parameters for three horizontal tail surfaces was made to provide an experimental verification of the method suggested. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Icing-protection requirements for reciprocating-engine induction systems

Icing-protection requirements for reciprocating-engine induction systems

Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Rollin, V. G.; Coles, W. D. & Mulholland, D. R.
Description: None
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The Kiln Drying of Wood for Airplanes

The Kiln Drying of Wood for Airplanes

Date: January 1, 1919
Creator: Tiemann, Harry D
Description: This report is descriptive of various methods used in the kiln drying of woods for airplanes and gives the results of physical tests on different types of woods after being dried by the various kiln-drying methods.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A method of estimating the knock rating of hydrocarbon fuel blend

A method of estimating the knock rating of hydrocarbon fuel blend

Date: January 1, 1943
Creator: Sanders, Newell D
Description: The usefulness of the knock ratings of pure hydrocarbon compounds would be increased if some reliable method of calculating the knock ratings of fuel blends was known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of developing a method of predicting the knock ratings of fuel blends.
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A low-speed experimental investigation of the effect of a sandpaper type of roughness on boundary-layer transition

A low-speed experimental investigation of the effect of a sandpaper type of roughness on boundary-layer transition

Date: January 1, 1958
Creator: Horton, E. A. & Vondoenhoff, A. E.
Description: None
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Performance of B. M. W. 185-Horsepower Airplane Engine

Performance of B. M. W. 185-Horsepower Airplane Engine

Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Sparrow, S W
Description: This report deals with the results of a test made upon a B. M. W. Engine in the altitude chamber of the Bureau of Standards, where controlled conditions of temperature and pressure can be made to simulate those of the desired altitude. A remarkably low value of fuel consumption - 041 per B. H. P. hour - is obtained at 1,200 revolutions per minute at an air density of 0.064 pound per cubic foot and a brake thermal efficiency of 33 per cent and an indicated efficiency of 37 per cent at the above speed and density. In spite of the fact that the carburetor adjustment does not permit the air-fuel ratio of maximum economy to be obtained at air densities lower than 0.064, the economy is superior to most engines tested thus far, even at a density lower than 0.064, the economies superior to most engines tested thus far, even at a density (0.03) corresponding to an altitude of 25,000 feet. The brake mean effective pressure even at full throttle is rather low. Since the weight of much of the engine is governed more by its piston displacement than by the power developed, a decreased mean effective pressure usually ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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