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 Decade: 1940-1949
Research and Development Reports, Vol. V, No. 6

Research and Development Reports, Vol. V, No. 6

Date: September 30, 1948
Creator: none
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Abstracts of Research and Development Reports

Abstracts of Research and Development Reports

Date: September 1, 1947
Creator: AEC
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Technical Cooperation Program Visit of Lawroski and Stevenson (U.S.) to Chalk River on December 9-10, 1948

Technical Cooperation Program Visit of Lawroski and Stevenson (U.S.) to Chalk River on December 9-10, 1948

Date: April 8, 1949
Creator: Lawroski, S. & Stevenson, C.E.
Description: Minutes of conferences held at Chalk River, Ontario. The subjects discussed related primarily to separations processes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Technical report for the period August 1, 1944 to September 30, 1944

Technical report for the period August 1, 1944 to September 30, 1944

Date: October 2, 1944
Creator: Willson, K. S.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Report of Committee, Liquid Process Waste Disposal and Reclamation

Report of Committee, Liquid Process Waste Disposal and Reclamation

Date: October 7, 1948
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiments to Test the Validity of the Linear R-Dose/Mutation Frequency Relation in Drosophila at Low Dosage

Experiments to Test the Validity of the Linear R-Dose/Mutation Frequency Relation in Drosophila at Low Dosage

Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Spencer, W.P. & Stern, C.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Monthly Progress Report No. 61 for May, 1948

Monthly Progress Report No. 61 for May, 1948

Date: May 31, 1948
Creator: Authors, Various
Description: This is the University of California, Radiation Laboratory monthly progress report for May 1948. It discusses the following: (1) 184-inch Cyclotron Program; (2) 60-inch Cyclotron Program; (3) Synchrotron Program; (4) Linear Accelerator Program; (5) Experimental Physics; (6) Theoretical Physics, (7) Isotope Separation Program; (8) Chemistry Departments; (9) Medical Physics; and (10) Health Physics and Chemistry.
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The Isolation and Properties of Curium

The Isolation and Properties of Curium

Date: August 1, 1948
Creator: Werner, Louis B.
Description: The isolation of curium, element number 96, in relatively pure form has been accomplished. A method, involving a solvent extraction process, is given for the purification of americium from lanthanum and other ions. The discovery of a higher oxidation state of americium led to a method of separating americium from curium. Separation of the two elements was also accomplished by use of ion exchange resins. The details of the isolation of curium are given; the results of the spectrographic analysis, specific activity measurement, and calorimetric determination of half life showed the curium to be relatively pure. The absorption of light of various wave-lengths by an aqueous solution of Cm(III) is described, and some physical effects of the radiation from the curium are noted.
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Isolation and Propterties of Curium

Isolation and Propterties of Curium

Date: July 28, 1948
Creator: Werner, L.B. & Perlman, I.
Description: The isolation of curium, element number 96, in relatively pure form has been accomplished. A method, involving a solvent extraction process, is given for the purification of americium from lanthanum and other ions. The discovery of a higher oxidation state of americium led to a method of separating americium from curium. Separation of the two elements was also accomplished by use of ion exchange resins. The details of the isolation of curium are given; the results of the spectrographic analysis, specific activity measurement, and calorimetric determination of half life showed the curium to be relatively pure. The absorption of light of various wave-lengths by an aqueous solution of Cm(III) is described, and some physical effects of the radiation from the curium are noted.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Progress Report No. 63 June 15-July 15, 1948

Progress Report No. 63 June 15-July 15, 1948

Date: July 30, 1948
Creator: Authors, Various
Description: This is the University of California, Radiation Laboratory progress report for June 15-July 15, 1948. It discusses the following: (1) 184-inch Cyclotron Program; (2) 60-inch Cyclotron Program; (3) Synchrotron Program; (4) Linear Accelerator Program; (5) Experimental Physics; (6) Theoretical Physics, (7) Isotope Separation Program; (8) Chemistry Departments; (9) Medical Physics; and (10) Health Physics and Chemistry.
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Progress Report No. 69. Dec. 15, 1948 to Jan. 15, 1949

Progress Report No. 69. Dec. 15, 1948 to Jan. 15, 1949

Date: January 30, 1949
Creator: Authors, Various
Description: This is the progress report for the University of California, Radiation Laboratory for December 15, 1948-January 15, 1949. It discusses the following: (1) Bevatron; (2) 184-inch Cyclotron Program; (3) 60-inch Cyclotron Program; (4) Synchrotron Operation; (5) Linear Accelerator and Van de Graaff Operation; (6) Experimental Physics; (7) Theoretical Physics, (8) Isotope Separation; (9) Chemistry Departments; (10) Medical Physics; and (11) Health Physics and Chemistry.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Casting Uranium Bars as a Substitute for the Extrusion Process

Casting Uranium Bars as a Substitute for the Extrusion Process

Date: January 1, 1945
Creator: Lindlief, W. Earl
Description: The usual method of producing uranium slugs for the reaction pile is to cast the metal into billets which are extruded into rod about 1.45 inches in diameter. Slugs are then machined from this to the final size of 1.359 inches in diameter by 8 inches long. Extrusion is done in the gamma range at a temperature of about 1000 C, where the metal is soft enough to be extruded at relatively low pressures. This operation is difficult and expensive and the product is not entirely satisfactory. The billets must be protected from oxidation during heating and extruding and the extruded rod must likewise be protected during cooling. Loss of metal due to oxidation is appreciable and a relatively large amount of scrap is produced. The production of dies suitable for use at the high temperatures involved is troublesome. The extruded rod must be straightened before machining and frequently contains stringers of oxide and voids or other internal defects.
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Comparison of Normal Process and Single Process (XC) Uranium

Comparison of Normal Process and Single Process (XC) Uranium

Date: October 7, 1946
Creator: Cleaves, H. E.
Description: Certain difficulties have been encountered in attempts to substitute a 'one-step' casting process, developed at Iowa State College, for the 'normal' process generally used for the production of extrusion billets. In the 'one-step' process molten metal is delivered from the reduction bomb to the billet mold instead of allowing the metal to solidify in the bomb with subsequent vacuum remelting of the biscuit metal before casting in the billet mold. Routine analyses had failed to establish significant differences in the composition of normal and one-step metal. The one-step billets had been extruded satisfactorily, and finished slugs were prepared and subjected to the usual canning operation. In subsequent tests however, it was found that a large percentage of the canned slugs were badly defective. An investigation was requested to determine the differences in composition or structure of the X-C and normal metal which would account for the failure of the X-C slugs. Samples of the failed slugs and of metal from various stages of both the one-step and normal processes were supplied by Madison Square Area, for comparison on the basis of analyses, microstructure, or such other tests as seemed desirable.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Direct Pouring of Liquid Metal from the Reduction Bomb

The Direct Pouring of Liquid Metal from the Reduction Bomb

Date: March 9, 1945
Creator: Wilhelm, H. A.
Description: By the time regular crude biscuit production was interrupted at Ames on November 9, 1944, we had made well over 100 special experimental castings by pouring the liquid metal directly from the bomb. The workmen on the regular crude production line were alternating these special castings with the regular runs without the assistance of the research group. The process had reached a state of development 'wherein the castings were made by pouring batches of about 135 pounds of liquid metal directly from the bomb into a water-cooled steel mold in the presence of air at atmospheric pressure. The pouring operation was effected through a mechanically operated valve in the bottom of the bomb. The workability of such a process has been well established, and the quality of the metal has been proved through candling and chemical tests. The first sixty billets produced by this method have been extruded successfully. A number of changes, designed to improve the quality and yield of the product and to simplify the process, have been made since producing the metal for these tests. The first set-up to test the possibility of pouring the metal directly from the bomb was made on a small scale here ...
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Distribution of Boron in Processing of Carnotite Concentrate

Distribution of Boron in Processing of Carnotite Concentrate

Date: March 13, 1947
Creator: O'Connors, R. J.
Description: It was desired to determine the distribution of boron in the various steps of the processing of domestic ore concentrates containing high percentages of boron. The experiments described in this report were directed toward that end. Summary of this report are: (1) a black oxide containing 0.6 ppm of boron was prepared from material containing 350 ppm; (2) less than 0.02% of the boron in the original material appeared in the black oxide; (3) the iron step did not remove appreciable amounts of boron; (4) the bulk of the extracted boron was removed in the soda salt precipitation; and (5) some of the boron was removed in the acid leach and calcination steps.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Distribution of Impurities in the Ether Extraction Process

The Distribution of Impurities in the Ether Extraction Process

Date: January 22, 1947
Creator: Brimm, E. O., Dr. & Mohr, P
Description: When uranium is purified by the ether extraction method, black oxide is dissolved in nitric acid and ether is added; an ether layer containing uranium and an aqueous layer containing uranium and impurities are obtained. The distribution of some impurities between the two phases and the effect of such impurities on the extraction process were studied. the processing required in the preparation of pure uranyl nitrate might be decreased if, instead of uranosic oxide, sodium diuranate was used as a source of uranium. If it is assumed that uranosic oxide contains the same amounts of impurities as sodium diuranate, with the exception of soda, the extraction of soda by the wash of an ether solution of nitrate prepared from diuranate would be the criterion of suitability of sodium diuranate. The distribution and effect of sodium in the extraction process was therefore investigated, and the results are described in this report. For various of the impurities, the distribution in the process and the effect on uranium holdup in the insoluble cake was investigated. Particular attention was given to the behavior of boron, vanadium, chromium, and molybdenum.
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Extraction of Uranium from Iron Box Sludge

Extraction of Uranium from Iron Box Sludge

Date: March 11, 1947
Creator: O'Connors, R. J.
Description: It was desired to establish the adaptability of iron box sludge, a residue recovered in the initial concentration of domestic ores, as a raw material from the production of high purity U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This report summarizes the experimental work on the extraction of uranium from iron box sludge and that on the removal of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} from the solutions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Treatment of Torbernite

Treatment of Torbernite

Date: January 21, 1946
Creator: Brimm, E. O., Dr.
Description: Production of black oxide from torbernite was studied on a laboratory scale from the standpoint of uranium extraction, reagent requirements, and removal of impurities. A small portion of the material was examined for its mineral constituents, using optical properties, X-ray diffraction patterns, and chemical analysis for identification. About 50% of the material was quartz; 30% green crystals of a copper-uranium phosphate; 10% of a black mineral, which was not identified, but which appeared to be an oxide mixture of nickel, cobalt, copper, and molybdenum; and small amounts of gibbsite, laterite and feldspar. There were no lower oxides of uranium in the sample.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Uranium Peroxide

Uranium Peroxide

Date: April 14, 1947
Creator: Brimm, E. O., Dr. & Nohr, P.
Description: It was desired to investigate the precipitation of UO{sub 4} in acid solution, in order to determine the suitability of this reaction for use in the purification of uranium. A series of tests was performed to establish the conditions for precipitation of UO{sub 4}. It was found that uranium could be completely precipitated from pure uranyl sulfate solution at a pH of 2.5 to 3.5, with only silght excess of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The presence of sodium sulfate interferred with complete precipitation. It was established that vanadium was preferentially oxidized, when present.
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The Site B Foundry (Final Report on Part I of P.A. No. 151-ML-54-2, F.S. 41)

The Site B Foundry (Final Report on Part I of P.A. No. 151-ML-54-2, F.S. 41)

Date: February 12, 1945
Creator: Lauletta, Paul
Description: The Site B Foundry is equipped for the melting and casting of tuballoy and its alloys. Castings weighing up to 750 pounds and as long as 40 inches can be made. Melting can be carried out in the vacuum, in inert gases or under fluxes. Heating is by high frequency induction. A description of the generally foundry layout, the furnace construction and operation, and of the auxiliary equipment is given in this report. The casting technique used in the Site B Foundry is designed to minimize piping and cold shuts in the billets. The top of the mold is kept hot and freezing of the billet takes place from the bottom. This hot topping minimizes piping. Controlled pouring into warm molds minimized cold shuts.
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A Study of the Distribution of Impurities in the Extraction of Uranyl Nitrate with Ether from Aqueous Solutions

A Study of the Distribution of Impurities in the Extraction of Uranyl Nitrate with Ether from Aqueous Solutions

Date: April 1, 1946
Creator: Conard, C. R.
Description: Early in 1942 it had been found on a laboratory scale that certain impurities such as the Rare Earths were removed by small water washes from an ether solution of Uranyl Nitrate. It was hoped that in the large production units to be constructed that the water soluble impurities would all be washed out by the time the radioactive Thorium had been removed, so that the decrease in radioactivity could be used as an index of the amount of all kinds of impurity remaining in the ether layer. Experience has taught both the production and the laboratory chemist to view with suspicion a process which claims to separate one element from all others in the periodic system with a simple set of manipulations such as an extraction. Furthermore, there is the familiar example of iodide ion which anyone would expect to be oxidized to iodine and then be transferred almost quantitatively to the ether layer from which it would not wash out. It seemed reasonable that other elements or ions would be found which would fail to wash out of the ether layer. Since the objective was the removal of the neutron absorbers whether their danger coefficients were especially high ...
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Precipitation of Sodium Diuranate from Pitchblende Liquors

Precipitation of Sodium Diuranate from Pitchblende Liquors

Date: February 4, 1947
Creator: Brimm, E. O., Dr.
Description: In the treatment of carnotite concentrates, sodium diuranate was prepared by acidifying tricarbonate liquors to eliminate carbon dioxide, and then precipitating the sodium salt by the addition of caustic. Direct precipitation of uranium by the addition of caustic to tricarbonate liquors was used when pitchblende ores were processed, because this procedure was more effective in giving a product with a low molybdenum content. Tests of this method in the laboratory and Pilot Plant indicated that low uranium losses (0.2 to 0.3%) would be encountered with typical liquors if 1.7 to 2.0 lbs of caustic were added for every pound of uranosic oxide in solution. Since losses as high as 3% were incurred in plant operations, further work was undertaken, in an effort to reduce the uranium concentration in the waste liquors.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Precipitation of Uranium Peroxide in the Presence of Fluorides

The Precipitation of Uranium Peroxide in the Presence of Fluorides

Date: January 1, 1941
Creator: King, Edward J.
Description: The large-scale recovery of uranium from materials which also contained great quantities of fluorides did not give a product which had a low enough fluoride content to be treated satisfactorily by the other extraction process. The objective of the investigations carried out in this laboratory was a method of reducing the amount of fluoride which accompanied the uranium. The material from which the uranium was recovered in the industrial process was a slag containing (in addition to uranium) magnesium fluoride, calcium and dolomitic lines, crucible dross, and other waste products from the reaction of magnesium metal and uranium hexafluoride. Most of the fluoride was removed from this mixture by heating the roasted and ground slag with sulfuric acid. The residue was mixed with water and much of the caclium sulfate and fluoride, magnesium fluoride, and hydrated ferric oxide and alumina was precipitated by reducing the acidity. After filtering off the precipitate, ammonium sulfate was added to the solution and uranium peroxide (UO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O) was precipitated by addition of hydrogen peroxide. The pH of the solution was maintained between 3.0 and 3.5 during the precipitation by addition of sodium hydroxide. The uranium peroxide, even after washing, contained between ...
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Preparation and use of Ammonium Diuranate in the Ether Extraction Process

Preparation and use of Ammonium Diuranate in the Ether Extraction Process

Date: February 4, 1947
Creator: Brimm, E. O., Dr. & Mohr, P.
Description: In the ether extraction process, as originally developed, purified uranium dioxide was obtained by evaporation and calcination of the uranyl nitrate solution, followed by calcination of the resultant UO{sub 3}. It was suggested that an alternate procedure might be developed, involving the precipitation of uranium from the nitrate solution as ammonium diuranate. This material could then be calcined to uranosic acid, or reduced directly to the dioxide. It had already been established that ammonium diuranate could be precipitated completely from uranyl nitrate solutions. Experiments were carried out to determine whether a basic nitrate, analogous to a known sulfate salt, would be formed in the process. Both direct reduction of the diuranate to UO{sub 2} and calcination to uranosic acid were investigated to determine the physical characteristics and residual nitrogen of the resultant brown oxide.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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