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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Resource Type: Pamphlet
Homes for birds

Homes for birds

Date: 1936
Creator: Kalmbach, E. R. (Edwin Richard), 1884- & McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962.
Description: Describes various types of birdhouses, where to place them, how to maintain them, and how to protect them against enemies of birds.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Back-yard poultry keeping.

Back-yard poultry keeping.

Date: 1924
Creator: Slocum, Rob R. (Rob Roy), 1883-1944. & Lee, Alfred R., b. 1887.
Description: Describes the advantages of keeping poultry at home; provides instructions for building, maintaining, and operating a poultry house.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Good proportions in the diet.

Good proportions in the diet.

Date: 1923
Creator: Hunt, Caroline Louisa, 1865-1927.
Description: Provides advice for planning meals and buying the appropriate amount of food for a family that does active, but not hard muscular work.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Rural planning : the social aspects of recreation places.

Rural planning : the social aspects of recreation places.

Date: 1924
Creator: Nason, W. C. (Wayne Crocker), b. 1874.
Description: Describes the trend toward establishing planned recreation areas in rural communities, and the economic and social benefits they provide to farmers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tobacco soils.

Tobacco soils.

Date: 1908
Creator: United States. Department of Agriculture.
Description: Discusses tobacco growing in terms of soil, climate, and distribution.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The cherry blossoms, Washington DC

The cherry blossoms, Washington DC

Date: 1969
Creator: United States. Dept. of the Interior.
Description: A brochure and map describing the history and locations of Japanese cherry trees in Washington, D.C.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Bird Houses and How to Build Them

Bird Houses and How to Build Them

Date: 1914
Creator: Dearborn, Ned, 1865-
Description: "A few years ago only four species were commonly regarded as house birds -- the house wren, the bluebird, the tree swallow, and the martin. Since the movement to protect birds and make neighbors of them began, however, their natures and needs have become better understood, and it is now known that many other species will avail themselves of houses constructed for them by their human friends. The practice of erecting bird houses in this country, while now nation-wide, is not so common and uniformly distributed as it should be, and more extended provisions of this nature can not fail to result in a largely increased number of house birds." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Good Seed Potatoes and How to Produce Them

Good Seed Potatoes and How to Produce Them

Date: 1913
Creator: Stuart, William, 1865-1951
Description: Report discussing seed selection practices for potatoes and the development of high-grade seed potatoes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Destroy the Common Barberry

Destroy the Common Barberry

Date: August 1919
Creator: E. C. (Elvin Charles) Stakman, 1885-1979
Description: Discusses the importance of eradicating the common barberry bush in order to prevent the spread of the disease black stem rust to wheat, oats, barley, rye, and wild grasses. Farmers are advised to dig up all common barberry bushes; however, Japanese barberry bushes are harmless and can remain, or farmers may even replace common barberry bushes with Japanese barberry bushes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Destroy the Common Barberry

Destroy the Common Barberry

Date: May 1919
Creator: E. C. (Elvin Charles) Stakman, 1885-1979
Description: Discusses the importance of eradicating the common barberry bush in order to prevent the spread of the disease black stem rust to wheat, oats, barley, rye, and wild grasses. Farmers are advised to dig up all common barberry bushes; however, Japanese barberry bushes are harmless and can remain, or farmers may even replace common barberry bushes with Japanese barberry bushes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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