Network maintenance July 27th between 7:30AM and 8:00AM CDT may cause service disruptions.

  You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1990-1999
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Beamline Initiative. Conceptual Design Report
The DOE is building a new generation 6-7 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source known as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility, to be completed in FY 1996, can provide 70 x-ray sources of unprecedented brightness to meet the research needs of virtually all scientific disciplines and numerous technologies. The technological research capability of the APS in the areas of energy, communications and health will enable a new partnership between the DOE and US industry. Current funding for the APS will complete the current phase of construction so that scientists can begin their applications in FY 1996. Comprehensive utilization of the unique properties of APS beams will enable cutting-edge research not currently possible. It is now appropriate to plan to construct additional radiation sources and beamline standard components to meet the excess demands of the APS users. In this APS Beamline Initiative, 2.5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on four straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional four bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these eight x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build standard beamline components to meet scientific and technological research demands of the Collaborative Access Teams. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Beamline Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. The document also describes the preconstruction R & D plans for the Beamline Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R & D. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283143/
7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Instrumentation Initiative. Conceptual Design Report
In this APS Instrumentation Initiative, 2.5-m-long and 5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on 9 straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional 9 bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these 18 x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build state-of-the-art insertion-device beamlines to meet scientific and technological research demands well into the next century. This new initiative will also include four user laboratory modules and a special laboratory designed to meet the x-ray imaging research needs of the users. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Instrumentation Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. According to these plans, this new initiative begins in FY 1994 and ends in FY 1998. The document also describes the preconstruction R & D plans for the Instrumentation Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R & D. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283119/
Actinide Recovery Using Aqueous Biphasic Extraction: Initial Developmental Studies
Aqueous biphasic extraction systems are being developed to treat radioactive wastes. The separation technique involves the selective partitioning of either solutes or colloid-size particles between two scible aqueous phases. Wet grinding of plutonium residues to an average particle size of one micron will be used to liberate the plutonium from the bulk of the particle matrix. The goal is to produce a plutonium concentrate that will integrate with existing and developing chemical recovery processes. Ideally, the process would produce a nonTRU waste stream. Coupling physical beneficiation with chemical processing will result in a substantial reduction in the volume of mixed wastes generated from dissolution recovery processes. As part of this program, we will also explore applications of aqueous biphasic extraction that include the separation and recovery of dissolved species such as metal ions and water-soluble organics. The expertise and data generated in this work will form the basis for developing more cost-effective processes for handling waste streams from environmental restoration and waste management activities within the DOE community. This report summarizes the experimental results obtained during the first year of this effort. Experimental efforts were focused on elucidating the surface and solution chemistry variables which govern partitioning behavior of plutonium and silica in aqueous biphasic extraction systems. Additional efforts were directed toward the development of wet grinding methods for producing ultrafine particles with diameters of one micron or less. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283129/
Activities and Operations of Argonne's Advanced Computing Research Facility : February 1990 through April 1991
This report reviews the activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) from February 1990 through April 1991. The ACRF is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The facility's principal objective is to foster research in parallel computing. Toward this objective, the ACRF operates experimental advanced computers, supports investigations in parallel computing, and sponsors technology transfer efforts to industry and academia. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283049/
Activities and Operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility : January 1989-January 1990
This report reviews the activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) for the period January 1, 1989, through January 31, 1990. The ACRF is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The facility's principal objective is to foster research in parallel computing. Toward this objective, the ACRF continues to operate experimental advanced computers and to sponsor new technology transfer efforts and new research projects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283006/
Advanced Evaporator Technology Progress Report FY 1992
This report summarizes the work that was completed in FY 1992 on the program "Technology Development for Concentrating Process Streams." The purpose of this program is to evaluate and develop evaporator technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process. Concentrating these streams and minimizing the volume of waste generated can significantly reduce disposal costs; however, equipment to concentrate the streams and recycle the decontaminated condensates must be installed. LICON, Inc., is developing an evaporator that shows a great deal of potential for this application. In this report, concepts that need to be incorporated into the design of an evaporator operated in a radioactive environment are discussed. These concepts include criticality safety, remote operation and maintenance, and materials of construction. Both solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data are needed to design an effective process for concentrating process streams. Therefore, literature surveys were completed and are summarized in this report. A model that is being developed to predict vapor phase compositions is described. A laboratory-scale evaporator was purchased and installed to study the evaporation process and to collect additional data. This unit is described in detail. Two new LICON evaporators are being designed for installation at Argonne-East in FY 1993 to process low-level radioactive waste generated throughout the laboratory. They will also provide operating data from a full-sized evaporator processing radioactive solutions. Details on these evaporators are included in this report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283090/
Analytical Electron Microscopy Characterization of Fernald soils. Annual Report, October 1993 - September 1994
A combination of backscattered electron imaging and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) with electron diffraction have been used to determine the physical and chemical properties of uranium contamination in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project in Ohio. The information gained from these studies has been used in the development and testing of remediation technologies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283105/
Analytical Electron Microscopy Characterization of Uranium-Contaminated Soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 Report
A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 micrometers in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283104/
ANL Technical Support Program for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management
A program was established for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to evaluate factors that are anticipated to affect waste glass reaction during repository disposal, especially in an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283098/
ANL Technical Support Program for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Annual Report for October 1991 - September 1992
Management (EM) to evaluate factors that are anticipated to affect waste glass reaction during repository disposal, especially in an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283097/
ANL Technical Support Program for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Annual Report October 1990 - September 1991
A program has been established for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to evaluate factors that are likely to affect waste glass reaction during repository disposal, with emphasis on an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283096/
ANL Technical Support Program for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Annual Report October 1993 - September 1994
A program was established for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to evaluate factors that are anticipated to affect waste glass reaction during repository disposal, especially in an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283099/
Annual Technical Report
Highlights of the Chemical Technology Division's activities during 1990, including electrochemical technology and advanced batteries and fuel cells, technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion, methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste, and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste, the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283045/
Annual Technical Report
Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes; (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) method, for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283005/
The Application of Automated Reasoning to Proof Translation and to Finding Proofs with Specified Properties: a Case Study in Many-Valued Sentential Calculus
In both mathematics and logic, many theorems exist such that each can be proved in entirely different ways. For a striking example, there exist theorems from group theory that can be proved by relying solely on equality and (from the viewpoint of automated reasoning) the use of paramodulation, but can also be proved in a notation in which equality is totally absent and the inference rule is condensed detachment (captured with a single clause and the rule hyper-resolution). A study of such examples immediately shows how far from obvious is the problem of producing a proof in one system even in the presence of a proof in another; such problems can be viewed as ones of translation, where the rules of translation and the translation itself are frequently difficult to obtain. In this report, we discuss in detail various techniques that can be applied by the automated reasoning program OTTER to address the translation problem to obtain a proof in one notation and inference system given a proof in a completely different notation and inference system. To illustrate the techniques, we present a full treatment culminating in a successful translation'' of a proof of a theorem from many-valued sentential calculus. To our delight and amazement, instead of the expected translation consisting of approximately 175 applications of condensed detachment, OTTER obtained a far shorter proof. We also touch on techniques for finding shorter proofs and techniques for finding proofs satisfying some given property. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283048/
Application of NMR Spectroscopy and Multidimensional Imaging to the Gelcasting Process and in-situ Real-Time Monitoring of Cross-Linking Polyacrylamide Gels
In the gelcasting process, a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers is cast in a mold. The process is different from injection molding in that it separates mold-filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging have been conducted for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and for mapping the polymerization. ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been obtained during polymerization of a premix of soluble reactive methacrylamide (monomer) and N, N'-methylene bisacrylamide (cross-linking molecules). The premix was polymerized by adding ammonium persulfate (initiator) and tetramethyl-ethylene-diamine (accelerator) to form long-chain, cross-linked polymers. The time-varying spin-lattice relaxation times T₁ during polymerization have been studied at 25 and 35 C, and the variation of spectra and T₁ with respect to extent of polymerization has been determined. To verify homogeneous polymerization, multidimensional NMR imaging was utilized for in-situ monitoring of the process. The intensities from the images are modeled and the correspondence shows a direct extraction of T₁ data from the images. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283183/
Application of the NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] Unsaturated Test Method to Actinide Doped SRL [Savannah River Laboratory] 165 Type Glass
The results of tests done using the Unsaturated Test Method are presented. These tests, done to determine the suitability of glass in a potential high-level waste repository as developed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, simulate conditions anticipated for the post-containment phase of the repository when only limited contact between the waste form and water is expected. The reaction of glass occurs via processes that are initiated due to glass/water vapor and glass/liquid water contact. Vapor interaction results in the initiation of an exchange process between water and the more mobile species (alkalis and boron) in the glass. The liquid reaction produces interactions similar to those seen in standard leaching tests, except due to the limited amount of water present and the presence of partially sensitized 304L stainless steel, the formation of reaction products greatly exceeds that found in MCC-1 type leach tests. The effect of sensitized stainless steel on the reaction is to enhance breakdown of the glass matrix thereby increasing the release of the transuranic elements from the glass. However, most of the plutonium and americium released is entrained by either the metal components of the test or by the reaction phases, and is not released to solution. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc282983/
Applied Physical Chemistry Progress Report, October 1991 - September 1992
This document reports on the work done in applied physical chemistry at the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in the period October 1991 through September 1992. this work includes research into the process that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor under development at ANL, and the properties of candidate tritium breeding materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283081/
Aqueous Biphasic Extraction of Uranium and Thorium from Contaminated Soils : Final Report
The aqueous biphasic extraction (ABE) process for soil decontamination involves the selective partitioning of solutes and fine particulates between two immiscible aqueous phases. The biphase system is generated by the appropriate combination of a water-soluble polymer (e.g., polyethylene glycol) with an inorganic salt (e.g., sodium carbonate). Selective partitioning results in 99 to 99.5% of the soil being recovered in the cleaned-soil fraction, while only 0.5 to 1% is recovered in the contaminant concentrate. The ABE process is best suited to the recovery of ultrafine, refractory material from the silt and clay fractions of soils. During continuous countercurrent extraction tests with soil samples from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site (Fernald, OH), particulate thorium was extracted and concentrated between 6- and 16-fold, while the uranium concentration was reduced from about 500 mg/kg to about 77 mg/kg. Carbonate leaching alone was able to reduce the uranium concentration only to 146 mg/kg. Preliminary estimates for treatment costs are approximately $160 per ton of dry soil. A detailed flowsheet of the ABE process is provided. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283192/
Argonne National Laboratory-East Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year
This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1990. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283035/
Argonne National Laboratory-East Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1989
This report discusses the results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for 1989. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk samples. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283003/
Argonne National Laboratory-East Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1991
This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1991. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283084/
Argonne National Laboratory-East Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1992
This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1992. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations .on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283085/
Argonne National Laboratory-East Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1993
This annual report on the ANL environmental protection program provides the DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the levels of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the vicinity of ANL and on the amounts, if any, added to the environment by ANL operations. It also summarizes compliance of ANL operations with applicable environmental laws and regulations and highlights significant accomplishments and problems related to environmental protection. The report follows the guidelines given in DOE Order 5400.1. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283086/
Argonne National Laboratory-East Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1994
This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1994. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283087/
Automated Insertion of Sequences into a Ribosomal RNA Alignment: an Application of Computational Linguistics in Molecular Biology
This thesis involved the construction of (1) a grammar that incorporates knowledge on base invariancy and secondary structure in a molecule and (2) a parser engine that uses the grammar to position bases into the structural subunits of the molecule. These concepts were combined with a novel pinning technique to form a tool that semi-automates insertion of a new species into the alignment for the 16S rRNA molecule (a component of the ribosome) maintained by Dr. Carl Woese`s group at the University of Illinois at Urbana. The tool was tested on species extracted from the alignment and on a group of entirely new species. The results were very encouraging, and the tool should be substantial aid to the curators of the 16S alignment. The construction of the grammar was itself automated, allowing application of the tool to alignments for other molecules. The logic programming language Prolog was used to construct all programs involved. The computational linguistics approach used here was found to be a useful way to attach the problem of insertion into an alignment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283053/
Automotive Vehicle Sensors
This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283198/
Basic TRUEX Process for Rocky Flats Plant
The Generic TRUEX Model was used to develop a TRUEX process flowsheet for recovering the transuranics (plutonium, americium) from a nitrate waste stream at Rocky Flats Plant. T\ digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283167/
Beach and Borrow Site Sediment Investigation for a Beach Nourishment at Ocean City, Maryland
Report describing the methodology used to sample and analyze sediment at Ocean City, Maryland as part of a beach nourishment project. During the project, sediment was moved from borrow sites to construct parts of the beach area; both the borrow sites and native beach were tested. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc304010/
Birds of the Kilbuck and Ahklun Mountain Region, Alaska
Summary of the birds of the Kilbuck and Ahklun Mountain region, including geographical distribution, population status, migration habits, nesting habitat, and zoogeography. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700997/
BlockSolve v1. 1: Scalable Library Software for the Parallel Solution of Sparse Linear Systems
BlockSolve is a software library for solving large, sparse systems of linear equations on massively parallel computers. The matrices must be symmetric, but may have an arbitrary sparsity structure. BlockSolve is a portable package that is compatible with several different message-passing pardigms. This report gives detailed instructions on the use of BlockSolve in applications programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283133/
Boiling Heat Transfer of Refrigerant R-113 in a Small-Diameter, Horizontal Tube
Results of a study of boiling heat transfer from refrigerant R-113 in a small-diameter (2.92-mm) tube are reported. Local heat transfer coefficients over a range of heat fluxes, mass fluxes, and equilibrium mass qualities were measured. The measured coefficients were used to evaluate eight different heat transfer correlations, some of which have been developed specifically for refrigerants. High heat fluxes and low flow rates are inherent in small channels, and this combination results in high boiling numbers. The high boiling number of the collected data shows that the nucleation mechanism was dominant. As a result, the two-phase correlations that predicted this dominance also predicted the data best if they also properly modeled the physical parameters. The correlations of Lazarek and Black and of Shah, as modified in this study, predicted the data very well. It is also shown that a simple form, suggested by Stephan and Abdelsalam for nucleate boiling, correlates the data equally well. This study is part of a research program in multiphase flow and heat transfer, with the overall objective of developing validated design correlations and predictive methods that will facilitate the design and optimization of compact heat exchangers for use with environmentally acceptable alternatives for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants and refrigerant mixtures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283116/
Boiling Heat Transfer with Three Fluids in Small Circular and Rectangular Channels
Small circular and noncircular channels are representative of flow passages act evaporators and condensers. This report describes results of an experimental study on heat transfer to the flow boiling of refrigerants (R-12) and refrigerant-134a (R-134a) in a small horizontal circular-cross-section tube. The tube diameter of 2.46 mm was chosen to approximate the hydraulic diameter of a 4.06 x 1.70 mm rectangular channel previously studied with R-12, and a 2.92-mm-diameter circular tube previously studied with R-113. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of channel geometry and fluid properties on the heat transfer coefficient and to obtain additional insights relative to the heat transfer mechanism(s). The current circular flow channel for the R-12 and R-134a tests was made of brass and had an overall length of 0.9 in. The channel wall was electrically heated, and thermocouples were installed on the channel wall and in the bulk fluid stream. Voltage taps were located at the same axial locations as the stream thermocouples to allow testing over an exit quality range to 0.94 and a large range of mass flux (58 to 832 kg/m sq s) and heat flux (3.6 to 59 kW/m sq). Saturation pressure was nearly constant, averaging 0.82 MPa for most of the testing, with some tests performed at a lower pressure of 0.4--0.5 MPa. Local heat transfer coefficients were determined experimentally as a function of quality along the length of the test section. Analysis of all data for three tubes and three fluids supported the conclusion that a nucleation mechanism dominates for flow boiling in small channels. Nevertheless, a convection-dominant region was obtained experimentally in this study at very low values of wall superheat (<(approx) 2.75C). The circular and rectangular tube data for three fluids were successfully correlated in the nucleation-dominant region. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283179/
CELEFUNT : a Portable Test Package for Complex Elementary Functions
This paper discusses CELEFUNT, a package of Fortran programs for testing complex elementary functions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283033/
Chaotic Dynamics of Loosely Supported Tubes in Crossflow
By means of the unsteady-flow theory and a bilinear mathematical model, a theoretical study was conducted of the chaotic dynamics associated with the fluid-elastic instability of loosely supported tubes. Calculations were performed for the RMS of tube displacement, bifurcation diagram, phase portrait, power spectral density, and Poincare map. Analytical results show the existence of chaotic, quasi-periodic, and periodic regions when flow velocity exceeds a threshold value. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283054/
Chaotic Vibrations of Nonlinearly Supported Tubes in Crossflow
By means of the unsteady-flow theory and a bilinear mathematical model, a theoretical study is presented for chaotic vibrations associated with the fluid-elastic instability of nonlinearly supported tubes in a crossflow. Effective tools, including phase portraits, power spectral density, Poincare maps, Lyapunov exponent, fractal dimension, and bifurcation diagrams, are utilized to distinguish periodic and chaotic motions when the tubes vibrate in the instability region. The results show periodic and chaotic motions in the region corresponding to fluid-damping-controlled instability. Nonlinear supports, with symmetric or asymmetric gaps, significantly affect the distribution of periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic motions of a tube exposed to various flow velocities in the instability region of the tube-support-plate-inactive mode. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283117/
Characterization of Plutonium-Bearing Wastes by Chemical Analysis and Analytical Electron Microscopy
This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO2, PuO₂x, and Pu4O7 phases, of about 1micrometer or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 micrometer to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283193/
Chemical Alteration of Limestone and Marble Samples Exposed to Acid Rain and Weathering in the Eastern United States, 1984-1988
In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering at four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc282991/
Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report: 1991
Annual report of the Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Technology Division (CMT) discussing the group's activities during 1991. These included electrochemical technology; fossil fuel research; hazardous waste research; nuclear waste programs; separation science and technology; integral fast reactor pyrochemical processes; actinite recovery; applied physical chemistry; basic chemistry research; analytical chemistry; research and development; and computer applications. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283070/
Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report: 1992
Annual report of the Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Technology Division (CMT) discussing the group's activities during 1992. These included electrochemical technology; fossil fuel research; hazardous waste research; nuclear waste programs; separation science and technology; integral fast reactor pyrochemical processes; actinide recovery; applied physical chemistry; basic chemistry research; analytical chemistry; applied research and development; and computer applications. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283071/
Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report: 1993
Annual report of the Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Technology Division (CMT) discussing the group's activities during 1992. These included electrochemical technology; fossil fuel research; hazardous waste research; nuclear waste programs; separation science and technology; integral fast reactor pyrochemical processes; actinide recovery; applied physical chemistry; basic chemistry research; and analytical chemistry. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283072/
Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report: 1994
Annual report of the Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Technology Division (CMT) discussing the group's activities during 1994. These included electrochemical technology; fossil energy research; hazardous waste research; nuclear waste programs; separation science and technology; electrometallurgical technology; actinide recovery; applied physical chemistry; basic chemistry research; analytical chemistry. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283073/
Color Measurements on Marble and Limestone Briquettes Exposed to Outdoor Environment in the Eastern United States
In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering at four field sites in the eastern United States. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283165/
COMMIX-1AR/P. a Three-Dimensional Transient Single-Phase Computer Program for Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of Single and Multicomponent Systems
The COMMIX-1AR/P computer code is designed for analyzing the steady-state and transient aspects of single-phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three spatial dimensions. This version is an extension of the modeling in COMMIX-1A to include multiple fluids in physically separate regions of the computational domain, modeling descriptions for pumps, radiation heat transfer between surfaces of the solids which are embedded in or surround the fluid, a k-{var epsilon} model for fluid turbulence, and improved numerical techniques. The porous-medium formulation in COMMIX allows the code to be applied to a wide range of problems involving both simple and complex geometrical arrangements. The basic equations, underlying assumptions, and solution techniques are presented for the entire computer code, covering both old and new features. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283028/
COMMIX-1AR/P. a Three-Dimensional Transient Single-Phase Computer Program for Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of Single and Multicomponent Systems, Volume 2: User's Guide
The COMMIX-1AR/P computer code is designed for analyzing the steady-state and transient aspects of single-phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three spatial dimensions. This version is an extension of the modeling in COMMIX-1A to include multiple fluids in physically separate regions of the computational domain, modeling descriptions for pumps, radiation heat transfer between surfaces of the solids which are embedded in or surround the fluid, a k-(epsilon) model for fluid turbulence, and improved numerical techniques. The porous-medium formulation in COMMIX allows the code to be applied to a wide range of problems involving both simple and complex geometrical arrangements. The input preparation and execution procedures are presented for the COMMIX-1AR/P program and several post processor programs which produce graphical displays of the calculated results. This document provides a step-by-step of how to use the program, including an input guide and a sample problem. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283126/
COMMIX-1AR/P. a Three-Dimensional Transient Single-Phase Computer Program for Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of Single and Multicomponent Systems, Volume 3: Programmer's Guide
The COMMIX-LAR/P computer program is designed for analyzing the steady-state and transient aspects of single-phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three spatial dimensions. This version is an extension of the modeling in COMMIX-lA to include multiple fluids in physically separate regions of the computational domain, modeling descriptions for pumps, radiation heat transfer between surfaces of the solids which are embedded in or surround the fluid, a keg model for fluid turbulence, and improved numerical techniques. The porous-medium formulation in COMMIX allows the program to be applied to a wide range of problems involving both simple and complex geometrical arrangements. The internal aspects of the COMMIX-LAR/P program are presented, covering descriptions of subprograms, variables, and files. This document provides a description of each subroutine and variable, showing linkage among these and their relation to the equations and variables presented in Volume 1. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283127/
COMMIX-PPC. a Three-Dimensional Transient Multicomponent Computer Program for Analyzing Performance of Power Plant Condensers
The COMMIX-PPC computer program is an extended and improved version of earlier COMMIX codes and is specifically designed for evaluating the thermal performance of power plant condensers. The COMMIX codes are general-purpose computer programs for the analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex industrial systems. In COMMIX-PPC, two major features have been added to previously published COMMIX codes. One feature is the incorporation of one-dimensional conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations on the tube side, and the proper accounting for the thermal interaction between shell and tube side through the porous medium approach. The other added feature is the extension of the three-dimensional conservation equations for shell-side flow to treat the flow of a multicomponent medium. COMMIX-PPC is designed to perform steady-state and transient three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow with heat transfer in a power plant condenser. However, the code is designed in a generalized fashion so that, with some modification, it can be used to analyze processes in any heat exchanger or other single-phase engineering applications. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283111/
COMMIX-PPC: A Three-Dimensional Transient Multicomponent Computer Program for Analyzing Performance of Power Plant Condensers, Volume 1: Equations and Numerics
Report on the COMMIX-PPC computer program, designed to evaluate the thermal performance of power plant condensers. This first volume "describes in detail the basic equations, formulation, solution procedures, and models for auxiliary phenomena" (p. iv). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283110/
A Comparative Study of Iron-, Nickel-, and Cobalt-Base Weldments Exposed in TVA 20-MW and Rocketdyne Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustors
Experimental iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-base weldment materials were exposed in TVA 20-MW and Rocketdyne atmospheric fluidized bed combustors (AFBCs) at 849 degrees C for 1261 h and 871 degrees C for 1000 h, respectively. Post-exposure analyses were conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. All specimens experienced different degrees of internal oxidation/sulfidation. Among eight filler materials, Marathon 25/35R and Haynes 188 showed the least corrosion attack, i.e., less than 0.5 mm/yr. A high nickel content in the weldment was unfavorable for corrosion resistance in the AFBC environment. Differences in the coal/bed chemistry of the TVA and Rocketdyne systems yielded different corrosion behavior in the materials. Calcium sulfate deposits on the specimens significantly affected the internal oxidation/sulfidation of the alloys. The results of this study supplement the material data base, in particular that of weldment performance, and aid in materials selection for AFBC applications. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283010/
Comparison of Cast-in-Place Concrete Versus Precast Concrete Stay-in-Place Forming Systems for Lock Wall Rehabilitation
"The objectives of this report are as follows: (a) To present the design and details utilized on the precast concrete panel rehabilitation at Troy Lock. (b) To compare the results of precast concrete panel rehabilitation with previous cast-in-place repairs, with respect to quality, cost, and schedule. (c) To recommend refinements in the details and methods of fabrication and erection of the precast panels, based on lessons learned from work performed at Troy Lock." (p. 2). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc303965/
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST