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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1990-1999
 Year: 1990
D-0 North End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results
The North endcap calorimeter vessel was recieved on July 1, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on July 10-11 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN107, and 3740.210-EN-110 for information about the CC cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 210 microns. Pumping on the vacuum space for the next 15 hours showed no progress and a leak detector was connected to the pumping line. A leak check showed a leak in a thermocouple feedthru on the vacuum space relief plate. After fixing the leak, the pressure dropped to 16 microns in less than one hour. A rate of rise test was performed starting at a pressure of 13 microns. The pressure rose to 39 microns within 8 minutes and then only rose to 43 microns in 2.5 hours (1.6 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. The lowest pressure achieved after 2 days of pumping was 80 microns. Valving out the pump for 30 minutes resulted in a 5 micron per minute rate of rise. The rate of rise was considered acceptable since there were known leak paths through the bolts of the signal ports. The EC North vessel was rolled outside of Lab A in preparation for a 5000 gallon liquid nitrogen trailer which arrived July, 10 at 8:00am. Before filling the vessel, the vacuum space pump was valved off. The pressure in the vacuum space was 12 microns at that point. During the next 24 hours of the test, the vacuum space pressure decreased to 5 microns. A plot of the vacuum space pressure with time is included at the end of this note. The liquid nitrogen was pressure transferred from the trailer at 29 psig to the pressure vessel at 1 psig for ten hours. At that time there was sufficient (16-inch) of liquid nitrogen in the vessel to turn the LN2 trailer delivery pump on. Thirteen and one half hours after starting the fill, the vessel had 50-inch of LN2 collected. During the latter part of the filling, about twelve loud metallic bangs were heard. The noises came at random intervals with sometimes five minutes between and other times an hour between. The best way to describe the sound is to imagine the sound made if someone was trapped inside the vessel with a baseball bat and took a good swing. The trailer was disconnected and the the vessel was left overnight for ten hours. Due to the slow LN2 fill rate, the temperature gradient in the pressure vessel shell was not very large, only about 25 kelvin difference was found from a RTD in the warm-up nozzle of the vessel and the resistors of the liquid level probe. A temperature versus time graph is included at the end of this note. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc831688/
D-0 South End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results
The South endcap calorimeter vessel was moved into Lab A on Sept. 18, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on Sept. 26 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. The test of the ECS was performed in the same manner using the same equipment as the ECN cold test. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN-I07, and 3740.210-EN-II0 for information about the CC cold test. Reference EN-260 for the results of the ECN cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 40 microns. The pumping continued overnight (another 16 hours). In the morning the pressure was 11.5 microns. A rate of rise test was performed. With the pump valved off, the pressure rose to 14 microns within 5 minutes and then rose to 16 microns in 6 hours (0.33 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. After 18 hours, the pressure vessel was down to 270 microns. An additional day of pumping took the pressure down to only 250 microns. A leak was then found and fixed around the seal of the rupture disc. The pump was put on line again. The pressure vessel with pump on line was 27 microns after 16.5 hours. A rate of rise was then conducted. The pressure was 90 microns after valving out the pump. After 30 minutes the pressure increased to 107 microns. (34 microns/hr). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc838127/
3-D computer simulations of EM fields in the APS vacuum chamber: Part 1, Frequency-domain analysis
The vacuum chamber proposed for the storage ring of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) basically consists of two parts: the beam chamber and the antechamber, connected to each other by a narrow gap. A sector of 1-meter-long chamber with dosed end plates, to which are attached the 1-inch-diameter beampipes centered at the beam chamber, has been built for experimental purposes. The 3-D code MAFIA has been used to simulate the frequency-domain behaviors of EM fields in this setup. The results are summarized in this note and are compared with that previously obtained from 2-D simulations and that from network analyzer measurements. They are in general agreement. A parallel analysis in the time-domain is reported in a separate note. The method of our simulations can be briefly described as follows. The 1-inch diameter beampipes are terminated by conducting walls at a length of 2 cm. The whole geometry can thus be considered as a cavity. The lowest RF modes of this geometry are computed using MAFIA. The eigenfrequencies of these modes are a direct output of the eigenvalue solver E3, whereas the type of each mode is determined by employing the postprocessor P3. The mesh sizes are chosen such that they are small enough for computations in the frequency region in which we are interested (the sampling theorem), while the total number of mesh points is still well within the range that our computer system can cope with. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc625418/
1989 OCRWM [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] Bulletin compilation and index
The OCRWM Bulletin is published by the Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to provide current information about the national program for managing spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This document is a compilation of issues from the 1989 calendar year. A table of contents and one index have been provided to assist in finding information contained in this year`s Bulletins. The pages have been numbered consecutively at the bottom for easy reference. 7 figs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc620406/
1990 Fischer Standard study
The purpose of this work is to develop a set of Titanium areal density standards for calibration and maintenance of the Fischer`s X-ray Fluorescence measurement system characterization curve program. The electron microprobe was calibrated for Titanium films on ceramic substrates using an existing set of laboratory standards (Quantity: 6 Range: 0.310 to 1.605). Fourteen source assemblies were measured and assigned values. These values are based on a mean calculation, of five separate readings, from best curve fit equations developed form the plot of the laboratory standards areal density (Source Measure) versus electron microprobe measurement (reading). The best fit equations were determined using the SAS General Linear Modeling (GLM) procedure. Four separate best fit equations were evaluated (Linear, Quadratic, Cubic and Exponential). Areal density values for the Fischer Standards appear here ordered by best fit equation based on maximum R{sup 2}. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc675224/
31st Annual Report
The ACIR Library is composed of publications that study the interactions between different levels of government. This document is an annual report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1301/
Acceleration of compact toruses and fusion applications
The Compact Torus (Spheromak-type) is a near ideal plasma confinement configuration for acceleration. The fields are mostly generated by internal plasma currents, plasma confinement is toroidal, and the compact torus exhibits resiliency and stability in virtue of the ``rugged`` helicity invariant. Based on these considerations we are developing a coaxial rail-gun type Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA). In the CTA, the CT ring is formed between coaxial electrodes using a magnetized Marshall gun, it is quasistatically ``precompressed`` in a conical electrode section for inductive energy storage, it is accelerated in a straight-coaxial electrode section as in a conventional rail-gun, and it is focused to small size and high energy and power density in a final ``focus`` cone section. The dynamics of slow precompression and acceleration have been demonstrated experimentally in the RACE device with results in good agreement with 2-D MHD code calculations. CT plasma rings with 100 {micro}gms mass have been accelerated to 40 Kj kinetic energy at 20% efficiency with final velocity = 1 X 10{sup 8} cm/s (= 5 KeV/H{sup +}). Preliminary focus tests exhibi dynamics of radius compression, deceleration, and bouncing. Compression ratios of 2-3 have been achieved. A scaled-up 10-100 MJ CTA is predicted to achieve a focus radius of several cm to deliver = 30 MJ ring kinetic energy in 5-10 nsec. This is sufficient energy, power, and power density to enable the CTA to act as a high efficiency, low cost ICF driver. Alternatively, the focused CT can form the basis for an magnetically insulated, inertial confinement fusion (MICF) system. Preliminary calculations of these fusion systems will be discussed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc692373/
Access to Space: The Future of U.S. Space Transportation Systems
This report is the final, summarizing report in a series of products from a broad assessment of space transportation technologies undertaken by OTA for the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39959/
Activities and Operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility : January 1989-January 1990
This report reviews the activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) for the period January 1, 1989, through January 31, 1990. The ACRF is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The facility's principal objective is to foster research in parallel computing. Toward this objective, the ACRF continues to operate experimental advanced computers and to sponsor new technology transfer efforts and new research projects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283006/
The Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (ALS, LBL)
The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation, in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1-1.9 GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. In this paper we describe the main accelerator components of the ALS, the variety of insertion devices, the radiation spectra expected from these devices, and the complement of experiments that have been approved for initial operation, starting in April 1993. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc846632/
Affordable Spacecraft: Design and Launch Alternatives
This background paper examines several proposals for reducing the costs of spacecraft and other payloads and describes launch systems for implementing them. It is one of a series of products of a broad assessment of space transportation technologies undertaken by OTA at the request of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39960/
Agricultural Research and Technology Transfer Policies for the 1990s: a special report of OTA's assessment on emerging agricultural technology: issues for the 1990s
This report addresses the central issues in the debate of the 1990 Farm Bill. It was requested as part of a larger study examining emerging agricultural technologies and related issues for the 1990s by the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry and the House Committee on Agriculture. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39961/
Los Alamos National Laboratory corregated metal pipe saw facility preliminary safety analysis report. Volume I
This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and design operation of the processing systems in the Corrugated Metal Pipe Saw Facility with respect to normal and abnormal conditions. Potential hazards are identified, credible accidents relative to the operation of the facility and the process systems are analyzed, and the consequences of postulated accidents are presented. The risk associated with normal operations, abnormal operations, and natural phenomena are analyzed. The accident analysis presented shows that the impact of the facility will be acceptable for all foreseeable normal and abnormal conditions of operation. Specifically, under normal conditions the facility will have impacts within the limits posted by applicable DOE guidelines, and in accident conditions the facility will similarly meet or exceed the requirements of all applicable standards. 16 figs., 6 tabs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc696986/
Alaskan Water for California?: The Subsea Pipeline Option
This background paper focuses on one technological option for increasing the supply of fresh water to the Southwest-that of building a freshwater subsea pipeline to transport water from Alaska to California. Originally a suggestion by Governor Walter Hickel of Alaska, the proposal has recently attracted attention in southern California. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39693/
Alternative configurations for the waste-handling building at the Yucca Mountain Repository
Two alternative configurations of the waste-handling building have been developed for the proposed nuclear waste repository in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One configuration is based on criteria and assumptions used in Case 2 (no monitored retrievable storage facility, no consolidation), and the other configuration is based on criteria and assumptions used in Case 5 (consolidation at the monitored retrievable storage facility) of the Monitored Retrievable Storage System Study for the Repository. Desirable waste-handling design concepts have been selected and are included in these configurations. For each configuration, general arrangement drawings, plot plans, block flow diagrams, and timeline diagrams are prepared. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc622061/
Alternative ways to develop a national consensus and program plan related to actinide burning
This paper discusses the merits of differing strategies that the Department of Energy might care to adopt for developing a broader consensus within the United States on whether the US should proceed with a major program on actinide burning and if so, in what manner. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc667372/
Analysis and Correction of the Closed Orbit Distortion for RHIC
. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc868281/
Analysis of a third-order sum resonance
It is worth considering an experiment on a sum resonance. I will give an analytic treatment of a third-order sum resonance. The treatment parallels that in LS-132 for the Walkinshaw difference resonance. Although the algebra is essentially the same as for the difference resonance, the sum resonance appears to have a richer structure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc682150/
Analysis of heat and mass transport processes near an emplaced nuclear waste canister; Final report
A review has been performed of the models and experimental plans for evaluation of the spent fuel canister environment in a nuclear repository, e.g., the planned Yucca Mountain facilities. Special emphasis was placed on the relevance of the models and experiments to the 100 to 10,000 year prediction. The question was addressed whether one could justify testing in materials other than Yucca Mountain rock and obtain results in a relatively short time which would be relevant to the long time in Yucca Mountain. The paper discusses steam evolution in calculations and experiments, fracture models, possible measurements of relative permeability, and long time scale effects. 5 figs. (MB) digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc624541/
An analysis of repository waste-handling operations
This report has been prepared to document the operational analysis of waste-handling facilities at a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. The site currently under investigation for the geologic repository is located at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The repository waste-handling operations have been identified and analyzed for the year 2011, a steady-state year during which the repository receives spent nuclear fuel containing the equivalent of 3000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and defense high-level waste containing the equivalent of 400 MTU. As a result of this analysis, it has been determined that the waste-handling facilities are adequate to receive, prepare, store, and emplace the projected quantity of waste on an annual basis. In addition, several areas have been identified where additional work is required. The recommendations for future work have been divided into three categories: items that affect the total waste management system, operations within the repository boundary, and the methodology used to perform operational analyses for repository designs. 7 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc628563/
Analysis of solute transport in an intermediate-scale unsaturated flow experiment
Radioactive waste disposal in the unsaturated zone and its subsequent migration and decay calls for prediction with the aid of transport models. Usually, such models consist of a system of partial differential equations for the concentration C (function of space and time) that has to be solved with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. These equations are based on physical first principles, but contain a number of parameters that have to be determined experimentally. Hence, experiments are crucial for validating the equations and their solution and for determining parameter values. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has initiated and performed a series of experiments at an intermediate scale, in caissons much larger than laboratory columns, of depth comparable with natural soil, but of limited horizontal extent. These experiments were conducted with both nonreactive and reactive solutes, and are described in a series of reports. Their main advantage is in expanding the scale on one hand, while permitting careful control and measurements on the other. 8 refs., 2 figs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619678/
Analytic Studies of Decapole Correction Schemes
. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc866794/
Annual Technical Report
Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes; (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) method, for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283005/
Anthracite R&D needs - CRADA 89-001. Final report
The purpose of this research is to foster the development of one or more high performance, anthracite-fired boiler systems suitable for meeting space heating and hot water requirements of large buildings. The boiler system research would include fuel handling, combustion and heat transfer, ash handling, and control systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc692813/
Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization
One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619017/
Application of the NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] Unsaturated Test Method to Actinide Doped SRL [Savannah River Laboratory] 165 Type Glass
The results of tests done using the Unsaturated Test Method are presented. These tests, done to determine the suitability of glass in a potential high-level waste repository as developed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, simulate conditions anticipated for the post-containment phase of the repository when only limited contact between the waste form and water is expected. The reaction of glass occurs via processes that are initiated due to glass/water vapor and glass/liquid water contact. Vapor interaction results in the initiation of an exchange process between water and the more mobile species (alkalis and boron) in the glass. The liquid reaction produces interactions similar to those seen in standard leaching tests, except due to the limited amount of water present and the presence of partially sensitized 304L stainless steel, the formation of reaction products greatly exceeds that found in MCC-1 type leach tests. The effect of sensitized stainless steel on the reaction is to enhance breakdown of the glass matrix thereby increasing the release of the transuranic elements from the glass. However, most of the plutonium and americium released is entrained by either the metal components of the test or by the reaction phases, and is not released to solution. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc282983/
Application of the NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] unsaturated test method to actinide doped SRL [Savannah River Laboratory] 165 type glass
The results of tests done using the Unsaturated Test Method are presented. These tests, done to determine the suitability of glass in a potential high-level waste repository as developed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, simulate conditions anticipated for the post-containment phase of the repository when only limited contact between the waste form and water is expected. The reaction of glass occurs via processes that are initiated due to glass/water vapor and glass/liquid water contact. Vapor interaction results in the initiation of an exchange process between water and the more mobile species (alkalis and boron) in the glass. The liquid reaction produces interactions similar to those seen in standard leaching tests, except due to the limited amount of water present and the presence of partially sensitized 304L stainless steel, the formation of reaction products greatly exceeds that found in MCC-1 type leach tests. The effect of sensitized stainless steel on the reaction is to enhance breakdown of the glass matrix thereby increasing the release of the transuranic elements from the glass. However, most of the Pu and Am released is entrained by either the metal components of the test or by the reaction phases, and is not released to solution. 16 refs., 20 figs., 17 tabs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc625241/
The application of vertical seismic profiling and cross-hole tomographic imaging for fracture characterization at Yucca Mountain
In order to obtain the necessary characterization for the storage of nuclear waste, much higher resolution of the features likely to affect the transport of radionuclides will be required than is normally achieved in conventional surface seismic reflection used in the exploration and characterization of petroleum and geothermal resources. Because fractures represent a significant mechanical anomaly seismic methods using are being investigated as a means to image and characterize the subsurface. Because of inherent limitations in applying the seismic methods solely from the surface, state-of-the-art borehole methods are being investigated to provide high resolution definition within the repository block. Therefore, Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) and cross-hole methods are being developed to obtain maximum resolution of the features that will possible affect the transport of fluids. Presented here will be the methods being developed, the strategy being pursued, and the rational for using VSP and crosshole methods at Yucca Mountain. The approach is intended to be an integrated method involving improvements in data acquisition, processing, and interpretation as well as improvements in the fundamental understanding of seismic wave propagation in fractured rock. 33 refs., 4 figs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc622406/
Approach to developing a ground-motion design basis for facilities important to safety at Yucca Mountain
The Department of Energy has proposed a methodology for developing a ground-motion design basis for prospective facilities at Yucca Mountain that are important to safety. The methodology utilizes a quasi-deterministic construct that is designed to provide a conservative, robust, and reproducible estimate of ground motion that has a one-in-ten chance of occurring during the preclosure period. This estimate is intended to define a ground-motion level for which the seismic design would ensure minimal disruption to operations; engineering analyses to ensure safe performance in the unlikely event that the design basis is exceeded are a part of the proposed methodology. 8 refs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc618832/
APS control system operating system choice
The purpose of this document is to set down the reasons and decisions regarding what is an important choice for the APS Control System design staff, namely the choice of an operating system for its principle computer resources. Since the choice also may affect cost estimates and the design handbook, there is a further need to document the process. The descriptions and explanations which follow are intended for reading by other APS technical area managers and will contain a minimum of buzz-words, and where buzz-words are used, they will be explained. The author hopes that it will help in understanding the current trends and developments in the volatile and fast-developing computer field. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc681591/
APS storage ring vacuum chamber tests for dimensional stability after bakeout cycling while under vacuum
Vacuum chamber sections No. 1 and No. 2 were used for these tests. Section No. 1, a short straight section, is representative in these tests of Sections No. 3 and No. 5 as well. Section No. 2 is the longer curved section used within the dipole bend magnets and is representative of the similar Section No. 4. The combination of Sections No. 1 and No. 2 joined by a connected bellows was mounted as presently planned for the final installation. This afforded an early testing of chamber positional stability after bakeout cycling. Tests of chamber dimensional stability were also made during vacuum cycling. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793194/
Arbitrary function generator for APS injector synchrotron correction magnets
The APS injector synchrotron ring measures about 368 m in circumference. In order to obtain the precision of the magnetic field required for the positron acceleration from 450 Mev to 7.7 Gev with low beam loss, eighty correction magnets are distributed around its circumference. These magnets provide the vernier field changes required for beam orbit correction during the acceleration phase of the injector synchrotron cycle. Because of mechanical imperfections in the construction, as well as installation of real dipole and multi-pole magnets, the exact field correction required at each correction magnet location is not known until a beam is actually accelerated. It is therefore essential that a means is provided to generate a correction field that is a function of the beam energy from injection until extraction for each correction magnet. The fairly large number of correction magnets in the system requires that the arbitrary function generator design be as simple as possible yet provide the required performance. An important, required performance feature is that the function can be changed or modified ``on the fly``, to provide the operator with a real-time feel during the tune up process. The arbitrary function generator described in this report satisfies these requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793747/
An Archaeological Reconnaissance Survey in the Geothermal Resource Subzone of Upper Kaimu, Makuu, Kaohe, Kehena, Kaapahu and Kamaili, Puna, Hawaii
No abstract prepared. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc892575/
The architecture of a network level intrusion detection system
This paper presents the preliminary architecture of a network level intrusion detection system. The proposed system will monitor base level information in network packets (source, destination, packet size, and time), learning the normal patterns and announcing anomalies as they occur. The goal of this research is to determine the applicability of current intrusion detection technology to the detection of network level intrusions. In particular, the authors are investigating the possibility of using this technology to detect and react to worm programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc684139/
Argon Spill Trough Bellows - Leak Test
The four argon spill trough bellows were leak tested with helium during the week of March 12, 1990. Three passed without incident, but the fourth was found to have a leak in the weld at one of the ring/clamps. The hole was approximately 1/32-inch in diameter (a likely result of a welding burn through) and located on an inflexible portion of the bellows, the ring/clamp. Frank Juravic, who conducted the tests, suggested using grey structural epoxy to plug the leak. The epoxy is metallic with some inherent flexibility. The epoxy was applied and the bellows retested in the same manner as before. The repair was a success as the bellows proved to be leaktight. The bellows were then put in their original shipping crates and placed in storage at Lab C. Included in this report is the manufacturer's spec sheets on the bellows, a copy of the Quality Control Report form and a sketch of the test setup with an explanation of the procedure. On the bellows data sheet entitled 'Analysis of Stress in Bellows', the analysis output is obtained through a theoretical bellows program that uses quadratic equations to approximate characteristic curves for such data as axial, lateral and angular movement and spring rates. The program is best suited for bellows with a wall thickness of at least 0.015-inch and an operating pressure significantly above atmospheric. Thus EJS Inc. warned that the output data would not be very accurate in some instances. The data given on the EJS Inc. sketch sheet should be taken as accurate, though, for it was taken from the actual bellows delivered. The 72-inch length includes the 64.64-inch of bellows section, the (3) 1/2-inch ring/clamps and the (2) 1-1/2-inch end bands. The remainder of the discrepancy is accounted for by a 2.75-inch factory elongation of the bellows from the original free length. The 40-inch compression capability includes the 2.75-inch of factory elongation, the program determined 31.9-inch of compression from free length and 5.35-inch of elastic compression of the bellows convolutions due to such a thin bellows wall. EJS Inc. ran a single (16-3/16-inch) bellows section through a 10-inch compression stroke for 1000 cycles with no sign of rupture or plastic deformation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc834441/
Argon Test Cell (ATC) Cryostat Engineering Note
No abstract prepared. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc846511/
Argonne National Laboratory-East Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1989
This report discusses the results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for 1989. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk samples. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283003/
Arming Our Allies: Cooperation and Competition in Defense Technology
This Special Report is the frost product of OTA assessment of international collaboration in defense technology. It provides an overview of the subject and analyzes the impact that changes in the environment of defense technology and reduced East-West tensions will exert on defense industrial cooperation and associated alliance relations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc39962/
ASME Code Data Report for the CC Cryostat
No abstract prepared. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc837630/
An Assessment of Freeze Brand and PIT Tag Recovery Data for Juvenile Salmonids at McNary Dam, 1988 Annual Report.
This study evaluated mark recovery data from PIT-tagged and freeze-branded river-run yearling and subyearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Q. nerka), and steelhead (0. mykiss) at McNary Dam in 1988. Double-marked (PIT-tagged and freeze-branded) juvenile salmonids were released within the McNary Dam collection system upstream from the PIT-tag detectors and brand sampling system. Results indicate that brands were recovered in smaller proportions than PIT tags and the variability of brand data was considerable. Most of the error associated with brands was attributable to human error inherent in brand detection and interpretation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc879112/
An Asymmetric B-Meson Factory at PEP
A preliminary design for a B-factory has been made using asymmetric collisions between positrons in the PEP storage ring and electrons in a new, low-energy ring. The design utilizes small-aperture, permanent-magnet quadrupoles close to the interaction point (IP). Optimization of optical and beam parameters at the IP will be discussed, as well as the lattice design of the interaction region and of the rings. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc837550/
Augmented Fish Health Monitoring in Idaho, 1989-1990 Annual Report.
The Idaho augmented fish health monitoring contract DE-A179-87BP65903 was awarded in June 1987 and fully implemented in January 1988. The third annual report of activities serviced under this contract is presented. The prevailing fish health problems in 1989 include persistent infections caused by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), by Myxobolus (Myxosoma) cerebralis, Renibacterium salmoninarum and drug resistant Aeromonas salmonicida at select hatcheries on Idaho's upper Columbia River tributaries. Administrative focus during the year was to fill vacant positions and still maintain the monitoring effort at levels agreed on under contract. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to eleven Idaho anadromous facilities. The present report describes work done to meet contract agreements and summarizes the fish health findings of anadromous stocks reared at and returning to Idaho's facilities during 1989. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc786527/
Background studies in support of a feasibility assessment on the use of copper-base materials for nuclear waste packages in a repository in tuff
This report combines six work units performed in FY`85--86 by the Copper Development Association and the International Copper Research Association under contract with the University of California. The work includes literature surveys and state-of-the-art summaries on several considerations influencing the feasibility of the use of copper-base materials for fabricating high-level nuclear waste packages for the proposed repository in tuff rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The general conclusion from this work was that copper-base materials are viable candidates for inclusion in the materials selection process for this application. 55 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc621449/
L-Band High Power Amplifiers for CEBAF Linac
The high power portion of the CEBAF RF system utilizes 340 5kW klystrons providing 339 separately controlled outputs. Modulating anodes have been included in the klystron design to provide for economically efficient operation. The design includes shunt regulator-type modulating anode power supplies running from the cathode power supply, and switching filament power supplies. Remotely programmable filament voltage allows maximum cathode life to be realized. Klystron operating setpoint and fast klystron protection logic are provided by individual external CEBAF RF control modules. A single cathode power supply powers a block of eight klystrons. The design includes circulators and custom extrusion and hybrid waveguide components which have allowed reduced physical size and lower cost in the design of the WR-650 waveguide transmission system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc925889/
Barium concentration in rock varnish: Implications for calibrated rock varnish dating curves
Cation-ratio dating rock varnish is a recently developed technique for obtaining surface exposure ages of a wide variety of geomorphic surfaces. As originally proposed, the technique utilizes a ratio among minor cations [(K + Ca)/Ti] in rock varnish. Although this varnish cation ratio is related to the Ti concentration, it can also be affected by the presence of Ba that may be partially included in the analyzed concentration of Ti. During energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Ba L-alpha and L-beta peaks overlap with Ti K-alpha and K-beta peaks. We have compared the effect of Ba concentration on calculated varnish cation ratios using quantitative EDS with the scanning electron microscope (SEM), quantitative wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) with a Cameca electron probe microanalyzer (EPM) and qualitative EDS with the SEM that does not decompose Ti and Ba lines. In this paper we document that, in fact, such separation of Ba from Ti is possible using both a quantitative (MICRO Q) and a semi-quantitative (SQ) Tracor Northern EDS analytical programs that decompose Ti and Ba lines. We also document that SEM EDS analyses may yield markedly similar results to wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) analyses of the same varnish using an EPM. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619696/
Basaltic volcanic episodes of the Yucca Mountain region
The purpose of this paper is to summarize briefly the distribution and geologic characteristics of basaltic volcanism in the Yucca Mountain region during the last 10--12 Ma. This interval largely postdates the major period of silicic volcanism and coincides with and postdates the timing of major extensional faulting in the region. Field and geochronologic data for the basaltic rocks define two distinct episodes. The patterns in the volume and spatial distribution of these basaltic volcanic episodes in the central and southern part of the SNVF are used as a basis for forecasting potential future volcanic activity in vicinity of Yucca Mountain. 33 refs., 2 figs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc618397/
Basic research for assessment of geologic nuclear waste repositories: What solubility and speciation studies of transuranium elements can tell us
Solubility and speciation data are important in understanding aqueous radionuclide transport through the geosphere. They define the source term for transport retardation processes such as sorption and colloid formation. Solubility and speciation data are useful in verifying the validity of geochemical codes that are part of predictive transport models. Results from solubility and speciation experiments of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2} {sup +}, {sup 239}Pu{sup 4+}, and {sup 241}Am{sup 3+}/Nd{sup 3+} in J-13 groundwater (from the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada, which is being investigated as a candidate high-level nuclear waste disposal site) at three different temperatures (25{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 90{degrees}C) and pH values (6, 7, and 8.5) are presented and compared with published modeling calculations. The comparison results indicate that there is a great need for experimental data on the solubility and speciation of transuranium elements under a wide range of conditions, for example, pH, Eh, temperature, and composition of groundwaters. Additionally, the influence of alpha radiation and the radiolysis of the secondary transuranium solids on solubility and speciation should be studies. Solubility studies and model calculations should be extended to other important long-lived nuclear waste radionuclides such as nickel, zirconium, cadmium, radium, and thorium. 14 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619835/
Beach and Borrow Site Sediment Investigation for a Beach Nourishment at Ocean City, Maryland
Report describing the methodology used to sample and analyze sediment at Ocean City, Maryland as part of a beach nourishment project. During the project, sediment was moved from borrow sites to construct parts of the beach area; both the borrow sites and native beach were tested. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc304010/
Beam loss and radiation effects in the SSC lattice elements
The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is designed to be an advanced machine with relatively low beam loss-induced radiation levels. However, a fraction of the beam lost in the lattice due to pp-collisions at the interaction points, beam-gas scattering, bearn-halo scraping, various instabilities and errors will result in the irradiation of conventional and superconducting components of the accelerator and experimental apparatus. The level of the beam loss and its distribution along the machine structure has impact on all of the three crucial radiation effects at the SSC: quenching of the superconducting magnets, survivability of the accelerator and detectors components in the near-beam regions, and influence to the environment. This paper, based on the full-scale Monte Carlo simulation, will explore all major sources of beam loss in the Collider and measures to reduce the irradiation of the accelerator components. Basic parameters of the Super Collider accepted throughout this report are as follows: Proton energy E{sub 0} = 20 TeV, injection energy is 2 TeV, number of protons circulating in each of the collider rings is N = 1.3 {times} 10{sup 14}, circumference is 87.12 km, the transverse normalized emittance {var_epsilon}{sub N}({sigma}) = 1 {pi} mm-mrad, for the regular lattice ({beta} = 305 m) the beam R.M.S. sizes are {sigma} = 0.12 mm at 20 TEV and {sigma} = 0.38 mm at the injection energy. The dipole length is 15.815 m with the effective field length of 15.165 m. The magnetic field map for B{sub 0} = 6.5999 T has been calculated with the POISSON program by Greg Snitchler. The turn angle of each dipole is {alpha} = 1.50027 mrad. The dipole aperture is 50 mm. The two beam pipe diameters are studied 33 and 40 mm. The operating temperature is T{sub 0} = 4.35 K. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793303/
The Beam Loss Monitors at CEBAF
The CEBAF beam will carry about 800 kW of power concentrated into a 200 zm diameter. Current estimates are that a stray beam will burn through the vacuum wall within 50226100 zsec. The CEBAF Fast Shutdown (FSD) system have been designed to prevent such an occurrence.Intial estimates of the time constraints dictated that FSD sensor functions would have about 10 zsec to detect and forward a fault to the FSD. The BLM is one of the sensor functions; therefore, we designed it to this specification. Reliability of the FSD was a critical concern that dictated a 5 MHz permission signal sent from the sensor function; permission exists when the signal is present, and is removed if the signal is not present for any reason, including system failure. A strong desire was expressed among the CEBAF design community for a short history of the radiation levels before a fault condition. All these considerations went into the design of the BLM system. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc934641/
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