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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Determination of the profile drag of an airplane wing in flight at high Reynolds numbers

Determination of the profile drag of an airplane wing in flight at high Reynolds numbers

Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Bicknell, J.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

The 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Harris, Thomas A
Description: This report presents a description of the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel and associated apparatus of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Included also are calibration test results and characteristic test data of both static force tests and autorotation tests made in the tunnel.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experimental and analytical determination of the motion of hydraulically operated valve stems in oil engine injection systems

Experimental and analytical determination of the motion of hydraulically operated valve stems in oil engine injection systems

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Gelalles, A G
Description: This research on the pressure variations in the injection system of the N.A.C.A. Spray Photography Equipment and on the effects of these variations on the motion of the timing valve stem was undertaken in connection with the study of fuel injection systems for high-speed oil engines. The methods of analysis of the pressure variations and the general equation for the motion of the spring-loaded stem for the timing valve are applicable to a spring-loaded automatic injection valve, and in general to all hydraulically operated valves. A sample calculation for a spring-loaded automatic injection valve is included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effect of supercharger capacity on engine and airplane performance

The effect of supercharger capacity on engine and airplane performance

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Schey, O W
Description: This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the effect of different supercharger capacities on the performance of an airplane and its engine . The tests were conducted on a DH4-M2 airplane powered with a Liberty 12 engine. In this investigation four supercharger capacities, obtained by driving a roots type supercharger at 1.615, 1.957, 2.4, and 3 time engine speed, were used to maintain sea-level pressure at the carburetor to altitudes of 7,000, 11,500, 17,000, and 22,000 feet, respectively. The performance of the airplane in climb and in level flight was determined for each of the four supercharger drive ratios and for the unsupercharged condition. The engine power was measured during these tests by means of a calibrated propeller. It was found that very little sacrifice in sea-level performance was experienced with the larger supercharger drive ratios as compared with performance obtained when using the smaller drive ratios. The results indicate that further increase in supercharger capacity over that obtained when using 3:1 drive ratio would give a slight increase in ceiling and in high-altitude performance but would considerably impair the performance for an appreciable distance below the critical altitude. As the supercharger capacity was increased, the height ...
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Tests of five metal model propellers with various pitch distributions in a free wind stream and in combination with model VE-7 fuselage

Tests of five metal model propellers with various pitch distributions in a free wind stream and in combination with model VE-7 fuselage

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Lesley, E P
Description: This report describes the tests of five adjustable blade metal model propellers both in a free wind stream and in combination with a model fuselage with stub wings. The propellers are of the same form and cross section but have variations in radial distributions of pitch. By making a survey of the radial distribution of air velocity through the propeller plane of the model fuselage it was found that this velocity varies from zero at the hub center to approximately free stream velocity at the blade tip. The tests show that the efficiency of a propeller when operating in the presence of the airplane is, over the working range, generally less than when operating in a free wind stream, but that a propeller with a radial distribution of pitch of the same nature as the radial distribution of air velocity through the propeller plane suffers the smallest loss in efficiency.
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Full-scale turning characteristics of the U.S.S. Los Angeles

Full-scale turning characteristics of the U.S.S. Los Angeles

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Thompson, F L
Description: This paper present a description of the method employed and results obtained in full-scale turning trials on the rigid airship U. S. S. "Los Angeles". The results of this investigation are not sufficiently comprehensive to permit definite conclusions as to the variation of turning characteristics with changes in speed and rudder angle. They indicate however, that the turning radius compares favorably with that for other large airships, that the radius is independent of the speed, that the position of the point of zero yaw is nearly independent of the rudder angle and air speed, and that a theoretical relation between radius and angle of yaw in a turn gives a close approximation to actuality.
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Flight tests on U.S.S. Los Angeles. Part II : stress and strength determination

Flight tests on U.S.S. Los Angeles. Part II : stress and strength determination

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Burgess, C P
Description: The tests described in this report furnished data on the actual aerodynamic forces, and the resulting stresses and bending moments in the hull of the U. S. S. "Los Angeles" during as severe still-air maneuvers as the airship would normally be subjected to, and in straight flight during as rough air as is likely to occur in service, short of squall or storm conditions. The maximum stresses were found to be within the limits provided for in accepted practice in airship design. Normal flight in rough air was shown to produce forces and stresses about twice as great as the most severe still-air maneuvers. No light was thrown upon the forces which might occur in extreme or exceptional conditions, such as the storm which destroyed the "Shenandoah". The transverse aerodynamic forces on the hull proper were found to be small and irregular. Owing to the necessity of conserving helium, it was impossible to fly the airship in a condition of large excess of buoyancy or weight in order to determine the air pressure distribution at a fixed angle of pitch. However, there is every reason to believe that in that condition the forces on the actual airship are as close ...
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The torsion of members having sections common in aircraft construction

The torsion of members having sections common in aircraft construction

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Trayer, George W
Description: Within recent years a great variety of approximate torsion formulas and drafting-room processes have been advocated. In some of these, especially where mathematical considerations are involved, the results are extremely complex and are not generally intelligible to engineers. The principal object of this investigation was to determine by experiment and theoretical investigation how accurate the more common of these formulas are and on what assumptions they are founded and, if none of the proposed methods proved to be reasonable accurate in practice, to produce simple, practical formulas from reasonably correct assumptions, backed by experiment. A second object was to collect in readily accessible form the most useful of known results for the more common sections. Formulas for all the important solid sections that have yielded to mathematical treatment are listed. Then follows a discussion of the torsion of tubular rods with formulas both rigorous and approximate.
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The torsional strength of wings

The torsional strength of wings

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Burgess, C P
Description: This report describes a simple method for calculating the position of the elastic axis of a wing structure having any number of spars. It is shown that strong drag bracing near the top and bottom of a wing greatly increases the torsional strength. An analytical procedure for finding the contribution of the drag bracing to the torsional strength and stiffness is described, based upon the principle of least work, and involving only one unknown quantity. A coefficient for comparing the torsional rigidity of different wings is derived in this report.
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Aerodynamic theory and tests of strut forms. Part II

Aerodynamic theory and tests of strut forms. Part II

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Smith, R H
Description: This report presents the second of two studies under the same title. In this part five theoretical struts are developed from distributed sources and sinks and constructed for pressure and resistance tests in a wind tunnel. The surface pressures for symmetrical inviscid flow are computed for each strut from theory and compared with those found by experiment. The theoretical and experimental pressures are found to agree quantitatively near the bow, only qualitatively over the suction range, the experimental suctions being uniformly a little low, and not at all near the stern. This study is the strut sequel to Fuhrmann's research on airship forms, the one being a study in two dimensions, the other in three. A comparison of results indicates that the agreement between theory and experiment is somewhat better for bodies of revolution than for cylinders when both are shaped for slight resistance. The consistent deficiency of the experimental suctions which is found in the case of struts was not found in the case of airships, for which the experimental suctions were sometimes above sometimes below their theoretical values.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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