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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
The physical effects of detonation in a closed cylindrical chamber

The physical effects of detonation in a closed cylindrical chamber

Date: January 1, 1935
Creator: Draper, C S
Description: Detonation in the internal-combustion engine is studied as a physical process. It is shown that detonation is accompanied by pressure waves within the cylinder charge. Sound theory is applied to the calculation of resonant pressure-wave frequencies. Apparatus is described for direct measurement of pressure-wave frequencies. Frequencies determined from two engines of different cylinder sizes are shown to agree with the values calculated from sound theory. An outline of the theoretically possible modes of vibration in a right circular cylinder with flat ends is included. An appendix by John P. Elting gives a method of calculating pressure in the sound wave following detonation.
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General airplane performance

General airplane performance

Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Rockfeller, W C
Description: Equations have been developed for the analysis of the performance of the ideal airplane, leading to an approximate physical interpretation of the performance problem. The basic sea-level airplane parameters have been generalized to altitude parameters and a new parameter has been introduced and physically interpreted. The performance analysis for actual airplanes has been obtained in terms of the equivalent ideal airplane in order that the charts developed for use in practical calculations will for the most part apply to any type of engine-propeller combination and system of control, the only additional material required consisting of the actual engine and propeller curves for propulsion unit. Finally, a more exact method for the calculation of the climb characteristics for the constant-speed controllable propeller is presented in the appendix.
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Elastic instability of members having sections common in aircraft construction

Elastic instability of members having sections common in aircraft construction

Date: January 1, 1932
Creator: Trayer, George W & March, H W
Description: Two fundamental problems of elastic stability are discussed in this report. In part one formulas are given for calculating the critical stress at which a thin, outstanding flange of a compression member will either wrinkle into several waves or form into a single half wave and twist the member about its longitudinal axis. A mathematical study of the problem, which together with experimental work has led to these formulas, is given in an appendix. Results of test substantiating the recommended formulas are also presented. In part two the lateral buckling of beams is discussed. The results of a number of mathematical studies of this phenomenon have been published prior to this writing, but very little experimentally determined information relating to the problem has been available heretofore. Experimental verification of the mathematical deductions is supplied.
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Air propellers in yaw

Air propellers in yaw

Date: January 1, 1937
Creator: Lesley, E P; Worley, George F & Moy, Stanley
Description: Report presents the results of tests conducted at Stanford University of a 3-foot model propeller at four pitch settings and at 0 degree, 10 degrees, 20 degrees, and 30 degrees yaw. In addition to the usual propeller coefficients, cross-wind and vertical forces and yawing, pitching, and rolling moments were determined about axes having their origin at the intersection of the blade axis and the axis of rotation. The tests showed that the maximum efficiency was reduced only slightly for angles of yaw up to 10 degrees but that at 30 degrees yaw the loss in efficiency was about 10 percent. In all cases the cross-wind force was found to be greater than the cross-wind component of the axial thrust. With a yawed propeller an appreciable thrust was found for v/nd for zero thrust at zero yaw. Yawing a propeller was found to induce a pitching moment that increased in magnitude with yaw.
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Application of practical hydrodynamics to airship design

Application of practical hydrodynamics to airship design

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Upson, Ralph H & Klikoff, W A
Description: The purpose of the first two parts of this report is to present in concise format all the formulas required for computation of the hydrodynamic forces, so that they can be easily computed for either straight or curvilinear flight. Improved approximations are also introduced having a high degree of accuracy throughout the entire range of practical proportions. The remaining two parts of the report are devoted respectively to stability and skin friction, as functions of the same hydrodynamic forces.
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A proof of the theorem regarding the distribution of lift over the span for minimum induced drag

A proof of the theorem regarding the distribution of lift over the span for minimum induced drag

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Durand, W F
Description: The proof of the theorem that the elliptical distribution of lift over the span is that which will give rise to the minimum induced drag has been given in a variety of ways, generally speaking too difficult to be readily followed by the graduate of the average good technical school of the present day. In the form of proof this report makes an effort to bring the matter more readily within the grasp of this class of readers.
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Aircraft woods: their properties, selection, and characteristics

Aircraft woods: their properties, selection, and characteristics

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Markwardt, L J
Description: Strength values of various woods for aircraft design for a 15 per cent moisture condition of material and a 3-second duration of stress are presented, and also a discussion of the various factors affecting the values. The toughness-test method of selecting wood is discussed, and a table of acceptance values for several species is given.
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A method of calculating the ultimate strength of continuous beams

A method of calculating the ultimate strength of continuous beams

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Newlin, J A & Trayer, George W
Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the strength of continuous beams after the elastic limit has been passed. As a result, a method of calculation, which is applicable to maximum load conditions, has been developed. The method is simpler than the methods now in use and it applies properly to conditions where the present methods fail to apply.
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Stability of thin-walled tubes under torsion

Stability of thin-walled tubes under torsion

Date: January 1, 1935
Creator: Donnell, L H
Description: In this report a theoretical solution is developed for the torsion on a round thin-walled tube for which the walls become unstable. The results of this theory are given by a few simple formulas and curves which cover all cases. The differential equations of equilibrium are derived in a simpler form than previously found, it being shown that many items can be neglected.
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An extended theory of thin airfoils and its application to the biplane problem

An extended theory of thin airfoils and its application to the biplane problem

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Millikan, Clark B
Description: The report presents a new treatment, due essentially to von Karman, of the problem of the thin airfoil. The standard formulae for the angle of zero lift and zero moment are first developed and the analysis is then extended to give the effect of disturbing or interference velocities, corresponding to an arbitrary potential flow, which are superimposed on a normal rectilinear flow over the airfoil. An approximate method is presented for obtaining the velocities induced by a 2-dimensional airfoil at a point some distance away. In certain cases this method has considerable advantage over the simple "lifting line" procedure usually adopted. The interference effects for a 2-dimensional biplane are considered in the light of the previous analysis. The results of the earlier sections are then applied to the general problem of the interference effects for a 3-dimensional biplane, and formulae and charts are given which permit the characteristics of the individual wings of an arbitrary biplane without sweepback or dihedral to be calculated. In the final section the conclusions drawn from the application of the theory to a considerable number of special cases are discussed, and curves are given illustrating certain of these conclusions and serving as examples to indicate ...
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On the theory of laminar boundary layers involving separation

On the theory of laminar boundary layers involving separation

Date: January 1, 1934
Creator: Von Karman, TH & Millikan, C
Description: This paper presents a mathematical discussion of the laminar boundary layer, which was developed with a view of facilitating the investigation of those boundary layers in particular for which the phenomenon of separation occurs. The treatment starts with a slight modification of the form of the boundary layer equation first published by Von Mises. Two approximate solutions of this equation are found, one of which is exact at the outer edge of the boundary layer while the other is exact at the wall. The final solution is obtained by joining these two solutions at the inflection points of the velocity profiles. The final solution is given in terms of a series of universal functions for a fairly broad class of potential velocity distributions outside of the boundary layer. Detailed calculations of the boundary layer characteristics are worked out for the case in which the potential velocity is a linear function of the distance from the upstream stagnation point. Finally, the complete separation point characteristics are determined for the boundary layer associated with a potential velocity distribution made up of two linear functions of the distance from the stagnation point. It appears that extensions of the detailed calculations to more complex ...
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The design of plywood webs for airplane wing beams

The design of plywood webs for airplane wing beams

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Trayer, George W
Description: This report deals with the design of plywood webs for wooden box beams to obtain maximum strength per unit weight. A method of arriving at the most efficient and economical web thickness, and hence the most suitable unit shear stress, is presented and working stresses in shear for various types of webs and species of plywood are given. The questions of diaphragm spacing and required glue area between the webs and flange are also discussed.
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The design of airplane wing ribs

The design of airplane wing ribs

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Newlin, J A & Trayer, George W
Description: The purpose of this investigation was to obtain information for use in the design of truss and plywood forms, particularly with reference to wing ribs. Tests were made on many designs of wing ribs, comparing different types in various sizes. Many tests were also made on parallel-chord specimens of truss and plywood forms in place of the actual ribs and on parts of wing ribs, such as truss diagonals and sections of cap strips. It was found that for ribs of any size or proportions, when they were designed to obtain a well-balanced construction and were carefully manufactured, distinct types are of various efficiencies; the efficiency is based on the strength per unit of weight. In all types of ribs the heavier are the stronger per unit of weight. Reductions in the weight of wing ribs are accompanied even in efficient designs by a much greater proportional reduction in strength.
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Tables for pressure of air on coming to rest from various speeds

Tables for pressure of air on coming to rest from various speeds

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Zahm, A F & Louden, F A
Description: In Technical Report no. 247 of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics theoretical formulas are given from which was computed a table for the pressure of air on coming to rest from various speeds, such as those of aircraft and propeller blades. In that report, the table gave incompressible and adiabatic stop pressures of air for even-speed intervals in miles per hour and for some even-speed intervals in knots per hour. Table II of the present report extends the above-mentioned table by including the stop pressures of air for even-speed intervals in miles per hour, feet per-second, knots per hour, kilometers per hour, and meters per second. The pressure values in table II are also more exact than values given in the previous table. To furnish the aeronautical engineer with ready numerical formulas for finding the pressure of air on coming to rest, table I has been derived for the standard values specified below it. This table first presents the theoretical pressure-speed formulas and their working forms in C. G. S. Units as given in NACA Technical Report No. 247, then furnishes additional working formulas for several special units of speed. (author).
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Flow and Force Equations for a Body Revolving in a Fluid

Flow and Force Equations for a Body Revolving in a Fluid

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Zahm, A F
Description: Part I gives a general method for finding the steady-flow velocity relative to a body in plane curvilinear motion, whence the pressure is found by Bernoulli's energy principle. Integration of the pressure supplies basic formulas for the zonal forces and moments on the revolving body. Part II, applying this steady-flow method, finds the velocity and pressure at all points of the flow inside and outside an ellipsoid and some of its limiting forms, and graphs those quantities for the latter forms. Part III finds the pressure, and thence the zonal force and moment, on hulls in plane curvilinear flight. Part IV derives general equations for the resultant fluid forces and moments on trisymmetrical bodies moving through a perfect fluid, and in some cases compares the moment values with those found for bodies moving in air. Part V furnishes ready formulas for potential coefficients and inertia coefficients for an ellipsoid and its limiting forms. Thence are derived tables giving numerical values of those coefficients for a comprehensive range of shapes.
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The torsion of members having sections common in aircraft construction

The torsion of members having sections common in aircraft construction

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Trayer, George W & March, H W
Description: Within recent years a great variety of approximate torsion formulas and drafting-room processes have been advocated. In some of these, especially where mathematical considerations are involved, the results are extremely complex and are not generally intelligible to engineers. The principal object of this investigation was to determine by experiment and theoretical investigation how accurate the more common of these formulas are and on what assumptions they are founded and, if none of the proposed methods proved to be reasonable accurate in practice, to produce simple, practical formulas from reasonably correct assumptions, backed by experiment. A second object was to collect in readily accessible form the most useful of known results for the more common sections. Formulas for all the important solid sections that have yielded to mathematical treatment are listed. Then follows a discussion of the torsion of tubular rods with formulas both rigorous and approximate.
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Tests of five metal model propellers with various pitch distributions in a free wind stream and in combination with model VE-7 fuselage

Tests of five metal model propellers with various pitch distributions in a free wind stream and in combination with model VE-7 fuselage

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Lesley, E P & Reid, Elliott G
Description: This report describes the tests of five adjustable blade metal model propellers both in a free wind stream and in combination with a model fuselage with stub wings. The propellers are of the same form and cross section but have variations in radial distributions of pitch. By making a survey of the radial distribution of air velocity through the propeller plane of the model fuselage it was found that this velocity varies from zero at the hub center to approximately free stream velocity at the blade tip. The tests show that the efficiency of a propeller when operating in the presence of the airplane is, over the working range, generally less than when operating in a free wind stream, but that a propeller with a radial distribution of pitch of the same nature as the radial distribution of air velocity through the propeller plane suffers the smallest loss in efficiency.
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Stress analysis of beams with shear deformation of the flanges

Stress analysis of beams with shear deformation of the flanges

Date: January 1, 1937
Creator: Kuhn, Paul
Description: This report discusses the fundamental action of shear deformation of the flanges on the basis of simplifying assumptions. The theory is developed to the point of giving analytical solutions for simple cases of beams and of skin-stringer panels under axial load. Strain-gage tests on a tension panel and on a beam corresponding to these simple cases are described and the results are compared with analytical results. For wing beams, an approximate method of applying the theory is given. As an alternative, the construction of a mechanical analyzer is advocated.
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Working charts for the determination of propeller thrust at various air speeds

Working charts for the determination of propeller thrust at various air speeds

Date: January 1, 1935
Creator: Hartman, Edwin P
Description: A set of propeller performance charts, based on a torque speed coefficient has been constructed from full-sized metal propeller data obtained in the NACA propeller-research tunnel.
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Working charts for the determination of the lift distribution between biplane wings

Working charts for the determination of the lift distribution between biplane wings

Date: January 1, 1934
Creator: Kuhn, Paul
Description: In this report are presented empirical working charts from which the distribution of lift between wings, that is the fraction of the total lift borne by each, can be determined in the positive lift range for any ordinary biplane cellule whose individual wings have the same profile. The variables taken directly into account include airfoil section, stagger, gap/chord ratio, decalage, chord ratio, and overhang. It is shown that the influence of unequal sweepback and unequal dihedral in upper and lower wings may be properly provided for by utilizing the concepts of average stagger and average gap/chord ratio, respectively. The effect of other variables is discussed, but they have not been included in the charts either because their influence was obviously small or because insufficient data existed to make possible a complete determination of their influence. All available pertinent biplane data were analyzed in establishing the charts, and in some cases theoretical relationships were utilized to establish qualitative tendencies.
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Working charts for the selection of aluminum alloy propellers of a standard form to operate with various aircraft engines and bodies

Working charts for the selection of aluminum alloy propellers of a standard form to operate with various aircraft engines and bodies

Date: January 1, 1931
Creator: Weick, Fred E
Description: Working charts are given for the convenient selection of aluminum alloy propellers of a standard form, to operate in connection with six different engine-fuselage combinations. The charts have been prepared from full-scale test data obtained in the 20-foot propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. An example is also given showing the use of the charts.
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Turbulence factors of NACA wind tunnels as determined by sphere tests

Turbulence factors of NACA wind tunnels as determined by sphere tests

Date: January 1, 1937
Creator: Platt, Robert C
Description: Report presents the results of drag and pressure tests of spheres having diameters of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 inches in eight NACA wind tunnels, in the air ahead of the carriage in the NACA tank, and beneath an autogiro in flight .
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Wind-tunnel interference with particular reference to off-center positions of the wing and to the downwash at the tail

Wind-tunnel interference with particular reference to off-center positions of the wing and to the downwash at the tail

Date: January 1, 1937
Creator: Silverstein, Abe & White, James A
Description: The theory of wind tunnel boundary influence on the downwash from a wing has been extended to provide more complete corrections for application to airplane test data. The first section of the report gives the corrections of the lifting line for wing positions above or below the tunnel center line; the second section shows the manner in which the induced boundary influence changes with distance aft of the lifting line. Values of the boundary corrections are given for off-center positions of the wing in circular, square, 2:1 rectangular, and 2:1 elliptical tunnels. Aft of the wing the corrections are presented for only the square and the 2:1 rectangular tunnels, but it is believed that these may be applied to jets of circular and 2:1 elliptical cross sections. In all cases results are included for both open and closed tunnels.
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Two-dimensional subsonic compressible flow past elliptic cylinders

Two-dimensional subsonic compressible flow past elliptic cylinders

Date: January 1, 1938
Creator: Kaplan, Carl
Description: The method of Poggi is used to calculate, for perfect fluids, the effect of compressibility upon the flow on the surface of an elliptic cylinder at zero angle of attack and with no circulation. The result is expressed in a closed form and represents a rigorous determination of the velocity of the fluid at the surface of the obstacle insofar as the second approximation is concerned. Comparison is made with Hooker's treatment of the same problem according to the method of Janzen and Rayleight and it is found that, for thick elliptic cylinders, the two methods agree very well. The labor of computation is considerably reduced by the present solution.
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