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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Year: 1933
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
The 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

The 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Harris, Thomas A
Description: This report presents a description of the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel and associated apparatus of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Included also are calibration test results and characteristic test data of both static force tests and autorotation tests made in the tunnel.
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Aircraft speed instruments

Aircraft speed instruments

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Beij, K Hilding
Description: This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.
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Application of practical hydrodynamics to airship design

Application of practical hydrodynamics to airship design

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Upson, Ralph H
Description: The purpose of the first two parts of this report is to present in concise format all the formulas required for computation of the hydrodynamic forces, so that they can be easily computed for either straight or curvilinear flight. Improved approximations are also introduced having a high degree of accuracy throughout the entire range of practical proportions. The remaining two parts of the report are devoted respectively to stability and skin friction, as functions of the same hydrodynamic forces.
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The characteristics of 78 related airfoil sections from tests in the variable-density wind tunnel

The characteristics of 78 related airfoil sections from tests in the variable-density wind tunnel

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N
Description: An investigation of a large group of related airfoils was made in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel at a large value of the Reynolds number. The tests were made to provide data that may be directly employed for a rational choice of the most suitable airfoil section for a given application. The variation of the aerodynamic characteristics with variations in thickness and mean-line form were systematically studied. (author).
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The characteristics of a Clark y wing model equipped with several forms of low-drag fixed slots

The characteristics of a Clark y wing model equipped with several forms of low-drag fixed slots

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Weick, Fred E
Description: This investigation was undertaken to develop a low-drag fixed slot for an airplane wing which would avoid the complications and maintenance difficulties of the present movable-type Handley Page slot. Tests were conducted on a series of fixed slots in an attempt to reduce the minimum drag coefficient without decreasing the maximum lift coefficient or the stalling angle of the slotted wing. The tests were made in the NACA 5-foot vertical wind tunnel on a Clark Y basic section having a 10-inch chord.
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Characteristics of Clark Y airfoils of small aspect ratios

Characteristics of Clark Y airfoils of small aspect ratios

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Zimmerman, C H
Description: This report presents the results of a series of wind tunnel tests showing the force, moment, and autorotational characteristics of Clark Y airfoils having aspect ratios varying from 0.5 to 3. An airfoil of rectangular plan form was tested with rectangular tips, flared tips, and semicircular tips. Tests were also made on one airfoil of circular plan form and two airfoils of elliptical plan form. The tests revealed a marked delay of the stall and a decided increase in values of maximum lift coefficient and maximum resultant force coefficient for aspect ratios of the order of 1 as compared with values for aspect ratios of 2 and 3.
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Combustion in a high-speed compression-ignition engine

Combustion in a high-speed compression-ignition engine

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Rothrock, A M
Description: An investigation conducted to determine the factors which control the combustion in a high-speed compression-ignition engine is presented. Indicator cards were taken with the Farnboro indicator and analyzed according to the tangent method devised by Schweitzer. The analysis show that in a quiescent combustion chamber increasing the time lag of auto-ignition increases the maximum rate of combustion. Increasing the maximum rate of combustion increases the tendency for detonation to occur. The results show that by increasing the air temperature during injection the start of combustion can be forced to take place during injection and so prevent detonation from occurring. It is shown that the rate of fuel injection does not in itself control the rate of combustion.
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Drop and flight tests on NY-2 landing gears including measurements of vertical velocities at landing

Drop and flight tests on NY-2 landing gears including measurements of vertical velocities at landing

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Peck, W D
Description: This investigation was conducted to obtain quantitative information on the effectiveness of three landing gears for the NY-2 (consolidated training) airplane. The investigation consisted of static, drop, and flight tests on landing gears of the oleo-rubber-disk and the mercury rubber-chord types, and flight tests only on a landing gear of the conventional split-axle rubber-cord type. The results show that the oleo gear is the most effective of the three landing gears in minimizing impact forces and in dissipating the energy taken.
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The effect of area aspect ratio on the yawing moments of rudders at large angles of pitch on three fuselages

The effect of area aspect ratio on the yawing moments of rudders at large angles of pitch on three fuselages

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Dryden, Hugh L
Description: This reports presents the results of measurements made of yawing moments produced by rudder displacement for seven rudders mounted on each of three fuselages at angles of pitch of 0 degree, 8 degrees, 12 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees. The dimensions of the rudders were selected to cover the range of areas and aspect ratios commonly used, while the ratios of rudder area to fin area and of rudder chord to fin chord were kept approximately constant. An important result of the measurements is to show that increased aspect ratio gives increased yawing moments for a given area, provided the maximum rudder displacement does not exceed 25 degrees. If large rudder displacements are used, the effect of aspect ratio is not so great.
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The effect of humidity on engine power at altitude

The effect of humidity on engine power at altitude

Date: January 1, 1933
Creator: Brooks, D G
Description: From tests made in the altitude chamber of the Bureau of Standards, it was found that the effect of humidity on engine power is the same at altitudes up to 25,000 feet as at sea level. Earlier tests on automotive engines, made under sea-level conditions, showed that water vapor acts as an inert diluent, reducing engine power in proportion to the amount of vapor present. By combining the effects of atmospheric pressure, temperature, and humidity, it is shown that the indicated power obtainable from an engine is proportional to its mass rate of consumption of oxygen. This has led the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to adopt a standard basis for the correction of engine performance, in which the effect of humidity is included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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