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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1940-1949
 Year: 1940
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
Aerodynamic characteristics of horizontal tail surfaces

Aerodynamic characteristics of horizontal tail surfaces

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Silverstein, Abe & Katzoff, S
Description: Collected data are presented on the aerodynamic characteristics of 17 horizontal tail surfaces including several with balanced elevators and two with end plates. Curves are given for coefficients of normal force, drag, and elevator hinge moment. A limited analysis of the results has been made. The normal-force coefficients are in better agreement with the lifting-surface theory of Prandtl and Blenk for airfoils of low aspect ratio than with the usual lifting-line theory. Only partial agreement exists between the elevator hinge-moment coefficients and those predicted by Glauert's thin-airfoil theory.
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The application of basic data on planing surfaces to the design of flying-boat hulls

The application of basic data on planing surfaces to the design of flying-boat hulls

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Diehl, Walter S
Description: Basic lift data on planing surfaces have been analyzed and the data applied to the design of flying-boat hulls. It is shown that a balance between air and water forces requires that the beam of the planing area bear a relation to the wing area that is determined by the lift coefficient of the wing and by the angle of dead rise in the planing surface. It is also shown that the fore-and-aft extent of the required planing area depends on the angle of dead rise. Failure to provide sufficient length of planing area appears to be the main reason for the poor water performance sometimes obtained when a large angle of dead rise is used.
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The calculated effect of various hydrodynamic and aerodynamic factors on the take-off of a large flying boat

The calculated effect of various hydrodynamic and aerodynamic factors on the take-off of a large flying boat

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Olson, R E & Allison, J M
Description: Report presents the results of an investigation made to determine the influence of various factors on the take-off performance of a hypothetical large flying boat by means of take-off calculations. The factors varied in the calculations were size of hull (load coefficient), wing setting, trim, deflection of flap, wing loading, aspect ratio, and parasite drag. The take-off times and distances were calculated to the stalling speeds and the performance above these speeds was separately studied to determine piloting technique for optimum take-off.
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Correlation of cooling data from an air-cooled cylinder and several multicylinder engines

Correlation of cooling data from an air-cooled cylinder and several multicylinder engines

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Pinkel, Benjamin & Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr
Description: The theory of engine-cylinder cooling developed in a previous report was further substantiated by data obtained on a cylinder from a Wright r-1820-g engine. Equations are presented for the average head and barrel temperatures of this cylinder as functions of the engine and the cooling conditions. These equations are utilized to calculate the variation in cylinder temperature with altitude for level flight and climb. A method is presented for correlating average head and barrel temperatures and temperatures at individual points on the head and the barrel obtained on the test stand and in flight. The method is applied to the correlation and the comparison of data obtained on a number of service engines. Data are presented showing the variation of cylinder temperature with time when the power and the cooling pressure drop are suddenly changed.
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Design charts relating to the stalling of tapered wings

Design charts relating to the stalling of tapered wings

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Soule, H A & Anderson, R F
Description: An aid in airplane design, charts have been prepared to show the effects of wing taper, thickness ratio, and Reynolds number on the spanwise location of the initial stalling point. Means of improving poor stalling characteristics resulting from certain combinations of the variables have also been considered; additional figures illustrate the influence of camber increase to the wing tips, washout, central sharp leading edges, and wing-tip slots on the stalling characteristics. Data are included from which the drag increases resulting from the use of these means can be computed. The application of the data to a specific problem is illustrated by an example.
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Determination of ground effect from tests of a glider in towed flight

Determination of ground effect from tests of a glider in towed flight

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Wetmore, J W & Turner, L I , Jr
Description: Report presents the results of an investigation made to find the effect of ground on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Franklin PS-2 glider. The lift, the drag, and the angle of attack of the glider in towed flight were determined at several heights from 0.14 to 1.19 span lengths and at various speeds for each height. Two wing arrangements were tested: the plain wing, and the wing with a nearly full-span 30-percent-chord split flap deflected 45 degrees. The experimental results for the plain wing were in good agreement with theoretical values calculated by the method of Wieselsberger for both the angle of attack and the drag coefficient at a height of 0.21 span length; Tani's refinements of the theory had a practically negligible effect on the computed values in this case.
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Effect of exit-slot position and opening on the available cooling pressure for NACA nose-slot cowlings

Effect of exit-slot position and opening on the available cooling pressure for NACA nose-slot cowlings

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Stickle, George W; Naiman, Irven & Crigler, John L
Description: Report presents the results of an investigation of full-scale nose-slot cowlings conducted in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel to furnish information on the pressure drop available for cooling. Engine conductances from 0 to 0.12 and exit-slot conductances from 0 to 0.30 were covered. Two basic nose shapes were tested to determine the effect of the radius of curvature of the nose contour; the nose shape with the smaller radius of curvature gave the higher pressure drop across the engine. The best axial location of the slot for low-speed operation was found to be in the region of maximum negative pressure for the basic shape for the particular operating condition. The effect of the pressure operating condition on the available cooling pressure is shown.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of fuel-air ratio, inlet temperature, and exhaust pressure on detonation

Effect of fuel-air ratio, inlet temperature, and exhaust pressure on detonation

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Taylor, E S; Leary, W A & Diver, J R
Description: An accurate determination of the end-gas condition was attempted by applying a refined method of analysis to experimental results. The results are compared with those obtained in Technical Report no. 655. The experimental technique employed afforded excellent control over the engine variables and unusual cyclic reproducibility. This, in conjunction with the new analysis, made possible the determination of the state of the end-gas at any instant to a fair degree of precision. Results showed that for any given maximum pressure the maximum permissible end-gas temperature increased as the fuel-air ratio was increased. The tendency to detonate was slightly reduced by an increase in residual gas content resulting from an increase in exhaust backpressure with inlet pressure constant.
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Effective gust structure at low altitudes as determined from the reactions of an airplane

Effective gust structure at low altitudes as determined from the reactions of an airplane

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Donely, Philip
Description: Measurements of gust structure and gust intensity were made in the lower levels of the atmosphere (0 to 3,500 ft.). An Aeronca C-2 airplane was used as the measuring instrument, the gust structure being derived from the recorded motions of the airplane. Data were also obtained on wind velocities and temperatures as functions of altitude for use in attempting to correlate the gust-structure data with various meteorological quantities. The results indicated little or no correlation between the gust velocity and the gradient distance. The data, however, did indicate that an airplane the size of the Aeronca will respond most frequently to gusts having gradient distance of the order of 30 feet. The maximum true gust velocity measured during the investigation was 25 feet per second.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flame speeds and energy considerations for explosions in a spherical bomb

Flame speeds and energy considerations for explosions in a spherical bomb

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Fiock, Ernest F; Marvin, Charles F , Jr; Caldwell, Frank R & Roeder, Carl H
Description: Simultaneous measurements were made of the speed of flame and the rise in pressure during explosions of mixtures of carbon monoxide, normal heptane, iso-octane, and benzene in a 10-inch spherical bomb with central ignition. From these records, fundamental properties of the explosive mixtures, which are independent of the apparatus, were computed. The transformation velocity, or speed at which flame advances into and transforms the explosive mixture, increases with both the temperature and the pressure of the unburned gas. The rise in pressure was correlated with the mass of charge inflamed to show the course of the energy developed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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