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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing-Cooling Ducts Effects of Propeller Slipstream, Special Report

Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing-Cooling Ducts Effects of Propeller Slipstream, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1939
Creator: Nickle, F. R. & Freeman, Arthur B.
Description: The safety of remotely operated vehicles depends on the correctness of the distributed protocol that facilitates the communication between the vehicle and the operator. A failure in this communication can result in catastrophic loss of the vehicle. To complicate matters, the communication system may be required to satisfy several, possibly conflicting, requirements. The design of protocols is typically an informal process based on successive iterations of a prototype implementation. Yet distributed protocols are notoriously difficult to get correct using such informal techniques. We present a formal specification of the design of a distributed protocol intended for use in a remotely operated vehicle, which is built from the composition of several simpler protocols. We demonstrate proof strategies that allow us to prove properties of each component protocol individually while ensuring that the property is preserved in the composition forming the entire system. Given that designs are likely to evolve as additional requirements emerge, we show how we have automated most of the repetitive proof steps to enable verification of rapidly changing designs.
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Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Date: October 1, 1938
Creator: Nickle, F. R. & Freeman, Arthur B.
Description: The systematic investigation of wing cooling ducts at the NACA laboratory has been continued with tests in the full-scale wind tunnel on ducts of finite span. These results extend the previous investigation on section characteristics of ducts to higher Reynolds numbers and indicate the losses due to the duct ends. The data include comparisons between ducts completely within the ring and the conventional underslung ducts. Methods of flow regulation were studied and data were obtained for a wide range of internal duct resistance. The results show satisfactory correlation between the finite span and the previously measured section characteristics obtained with full-span ducts. The effects of the various design parameters on the duct characteristics are discussed. The cooling power required for the internal duct installation is shown to be only a small percentage of the engine power.
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The Effect of Lateral Inclination of the Thrust Axis and of Sweepback of the Leading Edge of the Wing on Propulsive and Net Efficiencies of a Wing-Nacelle-Propeller Combination

The Effect of Lateral Inclination of the Thrust Axis and of Sweepback of the Leading Edge of the Wing on Propulsive and Net Efficiencies of a Wing-Nacelle-Propeller Combination

Date: April 1, 1935
Creator: Wood, Donald H. & Windler, Ray
Description: This report describes and gives the results of tests made to determine the effect of lateral inclination of the propeller thrust axis to the direction of flight. A wing-nacelle-propeller combination with the nacelle axis located successively parallel to and at 15 degrees to the perpendicular to the leading edge of a wing was tested with the combination at several angles of yaw. Tests of the wing alone at the same angles of yaw were also made. The data are presented in the usual graphic form. An increase in propulsive efficiency with increase in angle of the thrust axis was found. The change in net efficiency, found by charging the whole nacelle drag to the power unit, was negligible, however, within the range of the tests.
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NACA Radio Ground-Speed System for Aircraft, Special Report

NACA Radio Ground-Speed System for Aircraft, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1943
Creator: Hastings, Charles E.
Description: A method that utilizes the Doppler effect on radio signals for determining the speed of an airplane and the distance traveled by the airplane has been developed and found to operate satisfactorily. In this method, called the NACA radio ground-speed system, standard readily available radio equipment is used almost exclusively and extreme frequency stability of the transmitters is not necessary. No complicated equipment need be carried in the airplane, as the standard radio transmitter is usually adequate. Actual flight tests were made in which the method was used and the results were consistent with calibrated air speed indications and stop-watch measurements. Inasmuch as the fundamental accuracy of the radio method is far better than either of the checking systems used, no check was made on the limitations of the accuracy.
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An Investigation of the Drag of Windshields in the 8-Foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel

An Investigation of the Drag of Windshields in the 8-Foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Robinson, Russell G. & Delano, James B.
Description: The drag of closed-cockpit and transport-type windshields was determined from tests made at speeds from 200 to 440 miles per hour in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel. This speed range corresponds to a test Reynolds number range of 2,510,000 to 4,830,000 based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the full-span model (17.29 inches). The shapes of the windshield proper, the hood, and the tail fairing were systematically varied to include common types and a refined design. Transport types varied from a reproduction of a current type to a completely faired windshield. The results show that the drag of windshields of the same frontal area, on airplanes of small to medium size, may account for 15% of the airplane drag or may be reduced to 1%. Optimum values are given for windshield and tail-fairing lengths; the effect, at various radii is shown. The longitudinal profile of a windshield is shown to be most important and the transverse profile, to be much less important. The effects of retaining strips, of steps for telescoping hoods, and of recessed windows are determined. The results show that the drag of transport-type windshields may account for 21% of the fuselage drag or may be reduced ...
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A profile-drag investigation in flight on an experimental fighter-type airplane the North American XP-51

A profile-drag investigation in flight on an experimental fighter-type airplane the North American XP-51

Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Zalovcik, J. A.
Description: None
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Profile-Drag Investigation of an Airplane Wing Equipped with Rubber Inflatable De-Icer

Profile-Drag Investigation of an Airplane Wing Equipped with Rubber Inflatable De-Icer

Date: December 1, 1939
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A. & Jones, Alun R.
Description: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics has made profile-drag measurements in flight of a wing which was equipped with a rubber inflatable de-icer and to which various stimulated ice formations were attached. Tuft observations at the stalling speed of the wing with the various drag conditions were made in order to determine the influence on the maximum lift coefficient. The de-icer installation caused an increase of from 10-20% in the profile drag of the plain wing and reduced CL(sub max) about 6%. Simulated ice, when confined to the leading-edge region of the de-icer, had no measurable influence upon the profile drag at the cruising speed. This ice condition, however, reduced the value of CL(sub max) to about three-fourths that of the plain wing. Simulated ice in the form of a ridge along the upper and lower de-icer cap-strips increased the profile drag by about 360% at cruising speed. This condition reduced the CL(sub max) to approximately one-half that of the plain wing value.
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Radiator Design and Installation

Radiator Design and Installation

Date: May 1, 1939
Creator: Brevoort, M.J. & Leifer, M.
Description: The fundamental principles of fluid flow, pressure losses, and heat transfer have been presented and analyzed for the case of a smooth tube with fully developed turbulent flow. These equations apply to tubes with large length-diameter ratios where the f1ow is at a high Reynolds Number. The error introduced by using these equations increases as the magnitude of the tube length and the air-flow Reynolds Number approaches the values encountered in modern radiator designs. Accordingly, heat-transfer tests on radiator sections were made and the results are presented in nondimensional form to facilitate their use and for comparison with other heat-transfer data. In addition, pressure losses were measured along smooth tubes of circular, square, and rectangular cross section and the results were also correlated and are presented in nondimensional form. The problem of a radiator design for a particular installation is solved, the experimental heat-transfer and pressure-loss data being used, on a basis of power chargeable to the radiator for form drag, for propelling the weight, and for forcing the air through the radiator. The case of an installation within a wing or an engine nacelle is considered. An illustration of radiator design is carried through for an arbitrary set of ...
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Resume of Present Data on Load Distribution on Slots and Flaps, Special Report

Resume of Present Data on Load Distribution on Slots and Flaps, Special Report

Date: April 1, 1934
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J.
Description: This report covers a study of the generally available data on load distribution on slots and flaps. The study was made by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at the request of the Material Division, Army Air Corps to furnish information applicable to design criteria for slots and flaps of various types. The data are presented in three main sections: slots (Handley page type), auxiliary airfoils (fixed), and flaps.
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Radiator Design and Installation - II, Special Report

Radiator Design and Installation - II, Special Report

Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Tifford, Arthur N.
Description: A mathematical analysis of radiator design has been made. The volume of the radiator using least total power has been expressed in a single formula which shows that the optimum radiator volume is independent of the shape of the radiator and which makes possible the construction of design tables that give the optimum radiator volume per 100-horsepower heat dissipation as a function of the speed, of the altitude, and of one parameter involving characteristics of the airplane. Although, for a given set of conditions, the radiator volume using the least total power is fixed, the frontal area, or the length of the radiator needs to be separately specified in order to satisfy certain other requirement such as the ability to cool with the pressure drop available while the airplane is climbing. In order to simplify the specification for the shape of the radiator and in order to reduce the labor involved in calculating the detailed performance of radiators, generalized design curves have been developed for determining the pressure drop, the mass flow of air, and the power expended in overcoming the cooling drag of a radiator from the physical dimensions of the radiator. In addition, a table is derived from ...
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