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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an N.A.C.A. 23012 Airfoil with a Slotted Flap and Three Types of Auxiliary Flap

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an N.A.C.A. 23012 Airfoil with a Slotted Flap and Three Types of Auxiliary Flap

Date: December 1, 1938
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J. & Gauvain, Wiliam E.
Description: An investigation was made in the N.A.C.A. 7- by 10- foot wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic section characteristics of an N. A. C. A. 23012 airfoil with a single main slotted flap equipped successively with auxiliary flaps of the plain, split, and slotted types. A test installation mas used in which an airfoil of 7-foot span was mounted vertically between the upper and the lower sides of the closed test section so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. On the basis of maximum lift coefficient, low drag at moderate and high lift coefficients, and high drag at high lift coefficients, the optimum combination of the arrangements was found to be the double slotted flap . All the auxiliary flaps tested, however, increased the magnitudes of the pitching moments over those of the main slotted flap alone.
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Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

Date: February 1, 1940
Creator: Delano, James B.
Description: Investigations of the pressure distribution, the profile drag, and the location of transition for a 30-inch-chord 25-percent-thick N.A,C.A. 45-125 airfoil were made in the N.A.C.A 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of aiding in the development of a thick wing for high-speed airplanes. The tests were made at a lift coefficient of 0.1 for Reynolds Numbers from 1,750,000 to 8,690,000, corresponding to speeds from 80 to 440 miles per hour at 59 F. The effect on the profile drag of fixing the transition point was also investigated. The effect of compressibility on the rate of increase of pressure coefficients was found to be greater than that predicted by a simplified theoretical expression for thin wings. The results indicated that, for a lift coefficient of 0.1, the critical speed of the N.A.C,A. 45-125 airfoil was about 460 miles per hour at 59 F,. The value of the profile-drag coefficient at a Reynolds Number of 4,500,000 was 0.0058, or about half as large as the value for the N.A,C,A. 0025 airfoil. The increase in the profile-drag coefficient for a given movement of the transition point was about three times as large as the corresponding increase for the N.A.C,A. 0012 airfoil. Transition ...
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Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Stack, John
Description: Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the ...
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Intercooler Design for Aircraft, Special Report

Intercooler Design for Aircraft, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1939
Creator: Brevoort, M. J.; Joyner, U. T. & Leifer, M.
Description: When an airplane is operating at high altitude, it is necessary to use a supercharger to maintain ground pressure at the carburetor inlet. This maintenance and high intake-manifold pressure tends to keep the power output of the engine at ground-level value. The air, being compressed by the supercharger, however, is heated by adiabatic compression and friction to a temperature that seriously affect the performance of the engine. It is thus necessary to use an intercooler to reduce the temperature of the air between the supercharger outlet and the carburetor inlet. The amount of cooling required of the intercooler depend on the efficiency of the supercharger installation. In this investigation, several types of intercoolers were compared and a design procedure that will give the best intercooler for a given set of conditions is indicated. The figure of merit used for the selection of the best design was the total power consumed by the intercooler. This value includes the power required to transport the weight of the intercooler as well as the power used to force the charge air and the cooling air through the intercooler. The cost, size and practicality of construction were not considered, inasmuch as it was thought that ...
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A Study of Transparent Plastics for use on Aircraft, Special Report

A Study of Transparent Plastics for use on Aircraft, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1937
Creator: Axilrod, Benjamin M. & Kline, Gordon M.
Description: Various transparent organic plastics, including both commercially available and experimental materials, have been examined to determine their suitability for use as flexible windshields on aircraft, The properties which have been studied include light transmission, haziness, distortion, resistance to weathering, scratch and indentation hardness, impact strength, dimensional stability, resistance to water and various cleaning fluids, bursting strength at normal and low temperatures, and flammability.
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Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing-Cooling Ducts Effects of Propeller Slipstream, Special Report

Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wing-Cooling Ducts Effects of Propeller Slipstream, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1939
Creator: Nickle, F. R. & Freeman, Arthur B.
Description: The safety of remotely operated vehicles depends on the correctness of the distributed protocol that facilitates the communication between the vehicle and the operator. A failure in this communication can result in catastrophic loss of the vehicle. To complicate matters, the communication system may be required to satisfy several, possibly conflicting, requirements. The design of protocols is typically an informal process based on successive iterations of a prototype implementation. Yet distributed protocols are notoriously difficult to get correct using such informal techniques. We present a formal specification of the design of a distributed protocol intended for use in a remotely operated vehicle, which is built from the composition of several simpler protocols. We demonstrate proof strategies that allow us to prove properties of each component protocol individually while ensuring that the property is preserved in the composition forming the entire system. Given that designs are likely to evolve as additional requirements emerge, we show how we have automated most of the repetitive proof steps to enable verification of rapidly changing designs.
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Energy Loss, Velocity Distribution, and Temperature Distribution for a Baffled Cylinder Model, Special Report

Energy Loss, Velocity Distribution, and Temperature Distribution for a Baffled Cylinder Model, Special Report

Date: April 1, 1937
Creator: Brevoort, Maurice J.
Description: In the design of a cowling a certain pressure drop across the cylinders of a radial air-cooled engine is made available. Baffles are designed to make use of this available pressure drop for cooling. The problem of cooling an air-cooled engine cylinder has been treated, for the most part, from considerations of a large heat-transfer coefficient. The knowledge of the precise cylinder characteristics that give a maximum heat-transfer coefficient should be the first consideration. The next problem is to distribute this ability to cool so that the cylinder cools uniformly. This report takes up the problem of the design of a baffle for a model cylinder. A study has been made of the important principles involved in the operation of a baffle for an engine cylinder and shows that the cooling can be improved 20% by using a correctly designed baffle. Such a gain is as effective in cooling the cylinder with the improved baffle as a 65% increase in pressure drop across the standard baffle and fin tips.
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A Flight Investigation of Exhaust-Heat De-Icing, Special Report

A Flight Investigation of Exhaust-Heat De-Icing, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1940
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A. & Jones, Alun R.
Description: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics has conducted exhaust-heat de-icing tests inflight t o provide data needed in the application of this method of ice prevention. Thc capacity to extract heat from the exhaust gas for de-icing purposes, the quantity of heat required, and other factors were examined. The results indicate that a wing-heating system employing a spanwise exhaust tube within the leading edge of the wing will make available for de-icing purposes between 30 and 35 percent of the exhaust-gas heat. Data are given by which the heat required for ice prevention can be calculated. Sample calculations have been made, on a basis of existing engine power over wing area ratios, to show that sufficient heating can be obtained for ice protection on modern transport airplanes,.
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Tandem Air Propellers

Tandem Air Propellers

Date: August 1, 1937
Creator: Lesley, E.P.
Description: Tests of 2-blade, adjustable-pitch, counterrotating tandem model propellers, adjusted to absorb equal power at maximum efficiency, were made at Stanford University. The characteristics, for 15 degrees, 25 degrees, 35 degrees, and 45 degrees pitch settings at 0.75 R of the forward propeller and for 8 1/2%, 15% and 30% diameter spacings, were compared with those of 2-blade and 4-blade propellers of the same blade form. The tests showed that the efficiency of the tandem propellers was from 0.5% to 4% greater than that of a 4-blade propeller and, at the high pitch settings, not appreciable inferior to that of a 2-blade propeller. It was found that the rear tandem propeller should be set at a pitch angle slightly less than that of the forward propeller to realize the condition of equal power at maximum efficiency. Under this condition the total power absorbed by the tandem propellers was from 3% to 9% more than that absorbed by the 4-blade propeller and about twice that absorbed by a 2-blade propeller.
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Drag and Propulsive Characteristics of Air-Cooled Engine-Nacelle Installations for Large Airplanes, Special Report

Drag and Propulsive Characteristics of Air-Cooled Engine-Nacelle Installations for Large Airplanes, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1939
Creator: Silverstein, Abe & Wilson, Herbert A., Jr.
Description: An investigation is in progress in the NACA full-scale wind tunnel to determine the drag and propulsive efficiency of nacelle sizes. In contrast with the usual tests with a single nacelle, these tests were conducted with nacelle-propeller installations on a large model of a 4-engine airplane. Data are presented on the first part of the investigation, covering seven nacelle arrangements with nacelle diameters from 0.53 to 1.5 times the wing thickness. These ratios are similar to those occurring on airplane weighing from about 20 to 100 tons. The results show that the drag, the propulsive efficiency, and the overall efficiency of the various nacelle arrangements as functions of the nacelle size, the propeller position, and the airplane lift coefficient. The effect of the nacelles on the aerodynamic characteristics of the model are shown for both propeller-removed and propeller-operating conditions.
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