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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
The Effect of Various Wing-Gun Installations on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Airplane Model Equipped with an NACA Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

The Effect of Various Wing-Gun Installations on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Airplane Model Equipped with an NACA Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1941
Creator: Muse, Thomas C.
Description: An investigation was made in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel to determine the effect of various win-gun installation on the aerodynamic characteristics of a model with an NACA low-drag wing. Measurements were made of lift and drag over an angle-of-attack range and for several values of dynamic pressure on a four-tenths scale model of a high-speed airplane equipped with the low-drag wing and with various wing-gun installations. Two installations were tested: one in which the blast tube and part of the gun barrel protrude ahead of the wing and another in which the guns is mounted wholly within the wing. Two types of openings for the latter installation were tested. For each installation three simulated guns were mounted in each wing. The results are given in the form of nondimensional coefficients. The installations tested appear to have little effect on the maximum-lift coefficient of the model. However, the drag coefficient shows a definite change. The least adverse effect was obtained with the completely internal mounting and small nose entrance. The results indicate that a properly designed wing-gun installation will have very little adverse effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of the low-drag wing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effects of Direction of Propeller Rotation on the Longitudinal Stability of the 1/10-Scale Model of the North American XB-28 Airplane with Flaps Neutral, Special Report

Effects of Direction of Propeller Rotation on the Longitudinal Stability of the 1/10-Scale Model of the North American XB-28 Airplane with Flaps Neutral, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1942
Creator: Delany, Noel K.
Description: The effects of direction of propeller rotation on factors affecting the longitudinal stability of the XB-28 airplane were measured on a 1/10-scale model in the 7- by 10-foot tunnel of the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The main effect observed was that caused by regions of high downwash behind the nacelles (power off as well as power on with flaps neutral). The optimum direction of propeller rotation, both propellers rotating up toward the fuselage, shifted this region off the horizontal tail and thus removed its destabilizing effect. Rotating both propellers downward toward the fuselage moved it inboard on the tail and accentuated the effect, while rotating both propellers right hand had an intermediate result. Comparisons are made of the tail effects as measured by force tests with those predicted from the point-by-point downwash and velocity surveys in the region of the tail. These surveys in turn are compared with the results predicted from available theory.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA 66,2-216 Low-Drag Wing with Split Flaps of Various Sizes, Special Report

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA 66,2-216 Low-Drag Wing with Split Flaps of Various Sizes, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1941
Creator: Muse, Thomas C. & Neely, Robert H.
Description: An investigation was conducted in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel of a rectangular wing having NACA 66, 2-216 low-drag airfoil sections and various sizes of simple split flaps. The purpose of the investigation was, primarily, to determine the influence of these flap installations on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. Complete lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics were determined for a range of test Reynolds numbers from about 2,600,000 to 4,600,000 for each of the installations and for the plain wing. The results of this investigation indicate that values of maximum lift coefficient similar to those of wings with conventional airfoil sections and split flaps can be expected of wings having the NACA 66,2-216 low-drag sections. The increment of maximum lift due to the split flap was found to be practically independent of the Reynolds number over the range investigated. The optimum split flap on the basis of maximum lift appears to have a chord about 20% of the wing chord and a deflection of 60 degrees. The C(sub L) max of the wing with the 0.20c partial-span flap deflected 60 degrees is 2.07 at a Reynolds number of 4,600,000 while with the full-span flap it is approximately 2.53; the ...
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Study of Turning Performance of a Fighter-Type Airplane Particularly as Affected by Flaps and Increased Supercharging, Special Report

Study of Turning Performance of a Fighter-Type Airplane Particularly as Affected by Flaps and Increased Supercharging, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1942
Creator: Wetmore, J. W.
Description: Results of a study to determine the effects on turning performance due to various assumed modifications to a typical Naval fighter airplane are presented. The modifications considered included flaps of various types, both part and full space, increased supercharging, and increased wing loading. The calculations indicated that near the low-speed end of the speed range, the turning performance, as defined by steady level turns at a given speed, would be improved to some extent by any of the flaps considered at altitudes up to about 25,000 feet. (If turning is not restricted to the conditions of no loss of speed or altitude, more rapid turning can, of course, be accomplished with the aid of flaps, regardless of altitude.) Fowler flaps and NACA slotted flaps appeared somewhat superior to split or perforated split flaps for maneuvering purposes, particularly if the flap position is not adjustable. Similarly, better turning performance should be realized with full-span than with part-span flaps. Turning performance over the lower half of the speed range would probably not be materially improved at any altitude by increased supercharging of the engine unless the propeller were redesigned to absorb the added power more effectively; with a suitable propeller the turning ...
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Tests of Wing Machine-Gun and Cannon Installations in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Tests of Wing Machine-Gun and Cannon Installations in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Czarnecki, K. R. & Guryansky, Eugene R.
Description: At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, an investigation was conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel of wing installations of .50-caliber machine guns and 20-millimeter cannons. The tests were made to determine the effect of various gun installations on the maximum lift and the high-speed drag of the airplane.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
High-Speed Tests of a Model Twin-Engine Low-Wing Transport Airplane

High-Speed Tests of a Model Twin-Engine Low-Wing Transport Airplane

Date: April 1, 1940
Creator: Becker, John V. & Leonard, Lloyd H.
Description: Force tests were made of a 1/8-scale model of a twin-engine low-wing transport airplane in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel to investigate compressibility and interference effects at speeds up to 450 miles per hour. In addition to tests of the standard arrangement of the model tests were made with several modifications designed to reduce the drag and to increase the critical speed. The results show serious increases in drag at critical speeds below 450 miles per hour due to the occurrence of compressibility burbles on the standard radial-engine cowlings, on sections of the wing as a result of wing-nacelle interference, and on the semi-retracted main landing wheels. The critical speed at which the shock occurred on the standard cowlings was 20 miles per hour lower in the presence of the fuselage than in the presence of the wing only. The drag of the complete model was reduced 25% at 300 miles per hour by completely retracting the landing gear, fairing the windshield irregularities, and substituting streamline nacelles (with allowance made for the proper amount of cooling-air flow) for the standard nacelle arrangement. The values of the critical Mach number were extended from 0.47 to 0.60 as a result of ...
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The Effect of Initial Displacement of the Center Support on the Buckling of a Column Continuous over Three Supports

The Effect of Initial Displacement of the Center Support on the Buckling of a Column Continuous over Three Supports

Date: November 1, 1940
Creator: Lunquist, Eugene E. & Kotanchik, Joseph N.
Description: The test indicate that "an indiscriminate single application of the Southwell method (for analyzing Exp. Observations in problems of elastic stability)--can result in definite and measurable errors" The test also indicate "that the effect of curvature due to bending on the critical load for the compression flange material of a box beam is probably small and can be neglected." We have not found this to be true in our tests. It is believed that the effect of curvature, together with a small amount of fixity at the ribs, tends to force the stiffeners to bow in each bay thus effectively increasing their end fixity and thereby raising their allowable loads.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Interference of Tail Surfaces and Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 17 Combinations in the N.A.C.A. Variable-Density Tunnel

Interference of Tail Surfaces and Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 17 Combinations in the N.A.C.A. Variable-Density Tunnel

Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Sherman, Albert
Description: An investigation of the interference associated with tail surfaces added to wing-fuselage combinations was included in the interference program in progress in the NACA variable-density tunnel. The results indicate that, in aerodynamically clean combinations, the increment to the high-speed drag can be estimated from section characteristics within useful limits of accuracy. The interference appears mainly as effects on the downwash angel and as losses in the tail. An interference burble, which markedly increases the glide-path angle and the stability in pitch before the actual stall, may be considered a means of obtaining satisfactory stalling characteristics for a complete combination.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Critical Compressive Stress for Outstanding Flanges

Critical Compressive Stress for Outstanding Flanges

Date: April 1, 1941
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E. & Stowell, Elbridge Z.
Description: A chart is presented for the values of the coefficient in the formula for the critical compressive stress at which buckling may be expected to occur in outstanding flanges. These flanges are flat rectangular plates supported along the Loaded edges, supported and elastically restrained along one unloaded edge, and free along the other unloaded edge. The mathematical derivations of the formulas required for the construction of the chart are given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effects of Aerodynamic Heating on Ice Formations on Airplane Propellers

The Effects of Aerodynamic Heating on Ice Formations on Airplane Propellers

Date: August 1, 1940
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A.
Description: An investigation has been made of the effect of aerodynamic heating on propeller-blade temperatures. The blade temperature rise resulting from aerodynamic heating was measured and the relation between the resulting blade temperatures and the outer limit of the iced-over region was examined. It was found that the outermost station at which ice formed on a propeller blade was determined by the blade temperature rise resulting from the aerodynamic heating at that point.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department