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 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
The Torsional and Bending Deflection of Full-Scale Duralumin Propeller Blades under Normal Operating Conditions, Special Report

The Torsional and Bending Deflection of Full-Scale Duralumin Propeller Blades under Normal Operating Conditions, Special Report

Date: March 1, 1938
Creator: Hartman, Edwin P.
Description: The torsional deflection of the blades of three full-scale duralumin propellers operating under various loading conditions was measured by a light-beam method. Angular bending deflections were also obtained as an incidental part of the study. The deflection measurements showed that the usual present-day type of propeller blades twisted but a negligible amount under ordinary flight conditions. A maximum deflection of about 1/10th of a degree was found at V/nD of 0.3 and a smaller deflection at higher values of V/nD for the station at 0.70 radius. These deflections are much smaller than would be expected from earlier tests, but the light-beam method is considered to be much more accurate than the direct-reading transit method used in the previous tests.
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Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

Date: February 1, 1940
Creator: Delano, James B.
Description: Investigations of the pressure distribution, the profile drag, and the location of transition for a 30-inch-chord 25-percent-thick N.A,C.A. 45-125 airfoil were made in the N.A.C.A 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of aiding in the development of a thick wing for high-speed airplanes. The tests were made at a lift coefficient of 0.1 for Reynolds Numbers from 1,750,000 to 8,690,000, corresponding to speeds from 80 to 440 miles per hour at 59 F. The effect on the profile drag of fixing the transition point was also investigated. The effect of compressibility on the rate of increase of pressure coefficients was found to be greater than that predicted by a simplified theoretical expression for thin wings. The results indicated that, for a lift coefficient of 0.1, the critical speed of the N.A.C,A. 45-125 airfoil was about 460 miles per hour at 59 F,. The value of the profile-drag coefficient at a Reynolds Number of 4,500,000 was 0.0058, or about half as large as the value for the N.A,C,A. 0025 airfoil. The increase in the profile-drag coefficient for a given movement of the transition point was about three times as large as the corresponding increase for the N.A.C,A. 0012 airfoil. Transition ...
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Wind-tunnel investigation of several factors affecting the performance of a high-speed pursuit airplane with air-cooled radial engine

Wind-tunnel investigation of several factors affecting the performance of a high-speed pursuit airplane with air-cooled radial engine

Date: November 1, 1941
Creator: Wenzinger, C. J.
Description: None
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Interference of Tail Surfaces and Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 17 Combinations in the N.A.C.A. Variable-Density Tunnel

Interference of Tail Surfaces and Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 17 Combinations in the N.A.C.A. Variable-Density Tunnel

Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Sherman, Albert
Description: An investigation of the interference associated with tail surfaces added to wing-fuselage combinations was included in the interference program in progress in the NACA variable-density tunnel. The results indicate that, in aerodynamically clean combinations, the increment to the high-speed drag can be estimated from section characteristics within useful limits of accuracy. The interference appears mainly as effects on the downwash angel and as losses in the tail. An interference burble, which markedly increases the glide-path angle and the stability in pitch before the actual stall, may be considered a means of obtaining satisfactory stalling characteristics for a complete combination.
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Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an N.A.C.A. 23012 Airfoil with a Slotted Flap and Three Types of Auxiliary Flap

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an N.A.C.A. 23012 Airfoil with a Slotted Flap and Three Types of Auxiliary Flap

Date: December 1, 1938
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J. & Gauvain, Wiliam E.
Description: An investigation was made in the N.A.C.A. 7- by 10- foot wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic section characteristics of an N. A. C. A. 23012 airfoil with a single main slotted flap equipped successively with auxiliary flaps of the plain, split, and slotted types. A test installation mas used in which an airfoil of 7-foot span was mounted vertically between the upper and the lower sides of the closed test section so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. On the basis of maximum lift coefficient, low drag at moderate and high lift coefficients, and high drag at high lift coefficients, the optimum combination of the arrangements was found to be the double slotted flap . All the auxiliary flaps tested, however, increased the magnitudes of the pitching moments over those of the main slotted flap alone.
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Mechanical Properties of Flush-Riveted Joints

Mechanical Properties of Flush-Riveted Joints

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Bruggeman, Wm. C. & Roop, Frederick C.
Description: The strength of representative types of flush-riveted joints has been determined by testing 865 single-shearing, double-shearing, and tensile specimens representing 7 types of rivet and 18 types of joint. The results, presented in graphic form, show the stress at failure, type of failure, and d/t ratio. In general, 'dimpled' joints were appreciably stronger than countersunk or protruding-head joints, but their strength was greatly influenced by constructional details. The optimum d/t ratios have been determined for the several kinds of joints. Photomacrographs of each type show constructional details and, in several instances, cracks in the sheet.
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The Calculated Effect of Various Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Factors on the Take-Off of a Large Flying Boat

The Calculated Effect of Various Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Factors on the Take-Off of a Large Flying Boat

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Olson, R.E. & Allison, J.M.
Description: Present designs for large flying boats are characterized by high wing loading, high aspect ratio, and low parasite drag. The high wing loading results in the universal use of flaps for reducing the takeoff and landing speeds. These factors have an effect on takeoff performance and influence to a certain extent the design of the hull. An investigation was made of the influence of various factors and design parameters on the takeoff performance of a hypothetical large flying boat by means of takeoff calculations. The parameters varied in the calculations were size of hull (load coefficient), wing setting, trim, deflection of flap, wing loading, aspect ratio, and parasite drag. The takeoff times and distances were calculated to the stalling speeds and the performance above these speeds was studied separately to determine piloting technique for optimum takeoff. The advantage of quick deflection of the flap at high water speeds is shown.
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Critical Compressive Stress for Flat Rectangular Plates Supported Along all Edges and Elastically Restrained Against Rotation Along the Unloaded Edges, Special Report 189

Critical Compressive Stress for Flat Rectangular Plates Supported Along all Edges and Elastically Restrained Against Rotation Along the Unloaded Edges, Special Report 189

Date: May 1, 1941
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E. & Stowell, Eldbridge Z.
Description: A chart is presented for the values of the coefficient in the formula for the critical compressive stress at which buckling may be expected to occur in flat rectangular plates supported along all edges and, in addition, elastically restrained against rotation along the unloaded edges. The mathematical derivations of the formulas required in the construction of the chart are given.
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Critical Compressive Stress for Outstanding Flanges

Critical Compressive Stress for Outstanding Flanges

Date: April 1, 1941
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E. & Stowell, Elbridge Z.
Description: A chart is presented for the values of the coefficient in the formula for the critical compressive stress at which buckling may be expected to occur in outstanding flanges. These flanges are flat rectangular plates supported along the Loaded edges, supported and elastically restrained along one unloaded edge, and free along the other unloaded edge. The mathematical derivations of the formulas required for the construction of the chart are given.
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An Investigation of the Drag of Windshields in the 8-Foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel

An Investigation of the Drag of Windshields in the 8-Foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel

Date: June 1, 1939
Creator: Robinson, Russell G. & Delano, James B.
Description: The drag of closed-cockpit and transport-type windshields was determined from tests made at speeds from 200 to 440 miles per hour in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel. This speed range corresponds to a test Reynolds number range of 2,510,000 to 4,830,000 based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the full-span model (17.29 inches). The shapes of the windshield proper, the hood, and the tail fairing were systematically varied to include common types and a refined design. Transport types varied from a reproduction of a current type to a completely faired windshield. The results show that the drag of windshields of the same frontal area, on airplanes of small to medium size, may account for 15% of the airplane drag or may be reduced to 1%. Optimum values are given for windshield and tail-fairing lengths; the effect, at various radii is shown. The longitudinal profile of a windshield is shown to be most important and the transverse profile, to be much less important. The effects of retaining strips, of steps for telescoping hoods, and of recessed windows are determined. The results show that the drag of transport-type windshields may account for 21% of the fuselage drag or may be reduced ...
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