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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Special Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
An Electrical-Type Indicating Fuel Flowmeter

An Electrical-Type Indicating Fuel Flowmeter

Date: September 1, 1939
Creator: Tozier, Robert E.
Description: An electrical-type meter has been developed for measuring mass rates of flow of gasoline or other nonconducting fluids. Its temperature dependence is small over a large range and it has no known vibrational or viscosity errors. The maximum temperature rise is less than 5 C. The rates of flow, measurable within 1% with the present instrument, are approximately 100 to 1,000 or more pounds of gasoline per hour when a potentiometer is used, or 100 to 300 pounds per hour when a deflection-type meter is used.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Estimated Effect of Ring Cowl on the Climb and Ceiling of an Airplane, Special Report

Estimated Effect of Ring Cowl on the Climb and Ceiling of an Airplane, Special Report

Date: June 1, 1931
Creator: Louden, F. A.
Description: Although the application of a ring cowl to an airplane with an air-cooled engine increases the maximum L/D and the high speed to an appreciable extent, the performance in climb and ceiling is not increased as much as one would expect without analyzing the conditions. When a ring cowl is installed on an airplane, the propeller is set at a higher pitch to allow the engine to turn its rated r.p.m. at the increased high speed. V/nD is increased and the propeller efficiency at high speed is increased slightly. The ratio of r.p.m. at climbing speed, V(sub c) , to the r.p.m. at maximum speed, V (sub m) is dependent upon the ratio of V(sub c) to V(sub m). The increase in V(sub c) for all airplane with ring cowl i s not as great as the increase in V(sub m), so that the ratio V(sub c)/V(sub m) is less than for the airplane without ring. Consequently the r.p.m. and full throttle thrust power available are less at V(sub c) for the airplane with ring cowl and in spite of the increase in L/D due to the installation of the ring, the excess thrust power available for climbing is not ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Definition of Method of Measurement of Supporting and Control Surface Areas, Special Report

Definition of Method of Measurement of Supporting and Control Surface Areas, Special Report

Date: May 1, 1931
Creator: unknown
Description: Definitions of methods of measurements of supporting and control surface areas are presented. Methods for measuring the supporting surface, i.e., the wing area, and the control surfaces, i.e., the horizontal tail area, the vertical tail area, and the trailing control surface areas are defined. Illustrations of each of the areas are included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. I. Rivets and Spot Welds, 1, Rivets and Spot Welds

The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. I. Rivets and Spot Welds, 1, Rivets and Spot Welds

Date: February 1, 1938
Creator: Hood, Manley J.
Description: Tests have been conducted in the NACA 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel to determine the effect of exposed rivet heads and spot welds on wing drag. Most of the tests were made with an airfoil of 5-foot chord. The air speed was varied from 80 to 500 miles per hour and the lift coefficient from 0 to 0.30. The increases in the drag of the 5-foot airfoil varied from 6%, due to countersunk rivets, to 27%, due to 3/32-inch brazier-head rivets, with the rivets in a representative arrangement. The drag increases caused by protruding rivet heads were roughly proportional to the height of the heads. With the front row of rivets well forward, changes in spanwise pitch had negligible effects on drag unless the pitch was more than 2.5% of the chord. Data are presented for evaluating the drag reduction attained by removing rivets from the forward part of the wing surface; for example, it is shown that over 70% of the rivet drag is caused by the rivets on the forward 30% of the airfoil in a typical case.
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Method of Determining the Weights of the Most Important Simple Girders

Method of Determining the Weights of the Most Important Simple Girders

Date: December 1, 1931
Creator: Cassens, J.
Description: This paper presents a series of tables for the simple and more common types of girders, similar to the tables given in handbooks under the heading "Strength of Materials," for determining the moments, deflections, etc., of simple beams. Instead of the uniform cross section there assumed, the formulas given here apply only to girders of "uniform strength," i.e., it is assumed that a girder is so dimensioned that a given load subjects it to a uniform stress throughout its whole length. This principle is particularly applicable to very strong structures. Girders of uniform strength are the lightest girders conceivable, because any girder, all of whose members are stressed to the limit, can not be surpassed by a lighter girder, if the two girders have the same form. The weight G of a member of length l, cross section F and specific gravity gamma is: G = Flgamma.
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Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Date: September 1, 1936
Creator: Biermann, David
Description: The relative efficiencies of various engine-propeller combinations were the subject of a study that covered the important flight conditions, particularly the take-off. Design charts that graphically correlate the various propeller parameters were prepared to facilitate the solution of problems and also to c1arify the conception of the relationships of the various engine-propeller design factors. It is shown that, among the many methods for improving the take-off thrust, the use of high-pitch, large-diameter controllable propellers turning at low rotational speeds is probably the most generally promising. With such a combination the take-off thrust may be further increased, at the expense of a small loss in cruising efficiency, by compromise designs wherein the pitch setting is slightly reduced and the diameter is further increased. The degree of compromise necessary to accomplish the maximum possible take-off improvement depends on such design factors as overspeeding and overboosting at take-off as well as depending on the design altitude. Both overspeeding and designing for altitude operation have the same effect on the take-off thrust as compromising in that the propulsive efficiency is increased thereby; boosting the engine, however, has the reverse effect on the propulsive efficiency, although the brake horsepower is increased.
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Preliminary Wind-Tunnel and Flight Tests of a Balanced Split Flap, Special Report

Preliminary Wind-Tunnel and Flight Tests of a Balanced Split Flap, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1934
Creator: Weick, Fred E.
Description: One disadvantage that has been apparent in the operation of split flaps as used to date is the time and effort required to operate them. In this communication an investigation is being made of possible means for balancing them aerodynamically to make their operation easier. Several arrangements have been tested in the 7 by 210 foot wind tunnel, and the results of the wind-tunnel tests as well as preliminary flight tests on one of the more promising forms are given in this paper.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Relative Hydrodynamic Resistance of Various Types of Rivet Heads from Tests of Planning Surfaces, Special Report

The Relative Hydrodynamic Resistance of Various Types of Rivet Heads from Tests of Planning Surfaces, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1935
Creator: Truscott, Starr
Description: The Committee was requested to investigate the effect of various types of rivet heads on hydrodynamic resistance. The proposal was made to obtain the resistance of the various types of rivets by tests of planing surfaces on which the full size rivets would be arranged. The testing methods, results and conclusions are given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ice Prevention on Aircraft by Means of Impregnated Leather Covers, Special Report

Ice Prevention on Aircraft by Means of Impregnated Leather Covers, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1935
Creator: Clay, William C.
Description: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics is testing the effectiveness of a method to prevent the formation of ice on airplanes. The system makes use of a leather cover that is attached to the leading edge of the wing. A small tube, attached to the inner surface of the leather, distributes to the leading edge a solution that permeates throughout the leather and inhibits the formation of ice on the surface. About 25 pounds of the liquid per hour would be sufficient to prevent ice from forming on a wing of 50-foot span. The additional gross weight of the system will not be excessive. The tests are not yet completed but the method is thought to be practicable for the wing and it may also be adaptable to the propeller.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Study of Transparent Plastics for use on Aircraft. Supplement

A Study of Transparent Plastics for use on Aircraft. Supplement

Date: August 1, 1937
Creator: Axilrod, Benjamin M.
Description: This supplement to a NACA study issued in May 1937 entitled "A Study of Transparent Plastics for Use on Aircraft", contains two tables. These tables contain data on bursting strengths of plastics, particularly at low temperatures. Table 1 contains the values reported in a table of the original memorandum, and additional values obtained at approximately 25 C, for three samples of Acrylate resin. The second table contains data obtained for the bursting strength when one surface of the plastic was cooled to approximately -35 C.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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