You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Resource Type: Report
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Concurrent Receipt of Military Retirement and VA Disability Benefits: Budgetary Issues

Concurrent Receipt of Military Retirement and VA Disability Benefits: Budgetary Issues

Date: November 15, 2002
Creator: Belasco, Amy
Description: House and Senate conferees on the FY2003 National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 4546) are currently considering provisions that would lift the longstanding prohibition on concurrent receipt (simultaneous payment) of Department of Defense (DoD) retired pay and Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA) disability benefits. The House-passed bill would phase in partial concurrent receipt by providing both retirement and VA benefits for those with disabilities of 60 percent or above by FY2007. The Senate-passed bill provides full concurrent receipt for military retirees with any disability rating in FY2003.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Condemnation of Private Property for Economic Development: Legal Comments on the House-Passed Bill (H.R. 4128) and Bond Amendment

Condemnation of Private Property for Economic Development: Legal Comments on the House-Passed Bill (H.R. 4128) and Bond Amendment

Date: December 22, 2005
Creator: Meltz, Robert
Description: The prohibition on economic development condemnations extends not only to land taken for the explicit purpose of economic development but also to land subsequently so used. The latter coverage raises the possibility that although a parcel was initially condemned for a non-prohibited purpose, its use years later for a prohibited one would trigger the two-year cut-off of federal funds. Nor does there seem to be any proportionality requirement between the prohibited condemnations and the length and scope of the federal funds suspension. If Congress’ Spending Power includes a proportionality requirement for conditions on federal funds, as the Court suggests, the absence of proportionality in some of the bill’s applications may raise a constitutional issue.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conditions on U.S. Aid to Serbia

Conditions on U.S. Aid to Serbia

Date: July 21, 2005
Creator: Woehrel, Steven
Description: In each of the past five fiscal years (FY2001-FY2005), Congress has conditioned U.S. aid to Serbia on a presidential certification that Serbia has met certain conditions, including cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The 1 Ogth Congress is considering similar certification provisions in the FY2006 foreign aid bill. Supporters of aid conditionality say such provisions may have spurred Serbia's cooperation with the Tribunal. While the certification process continues to enjoy support in Congress, the Administration appears to favor ending it soon, as well as shifting responsibility for prosecuting war crimes from the ICTY to local courts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conditions on U.S. Aid to Serbia

Conditions on U.S. Aid to Serbia

Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Woehrel, Steven
Description: In each of the past five fiscal years (FY2001-FY2005), Congress has conditioned U.S. aid to Serbia on a presidential certification that Serbia has met certain conditions, including cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The 1 Ogth Congress is considering similar certification provisions in the FY2006 foreign aid bill. Supporters of aid conditionality say such provisions may have spurred Serbia's cooperation with the Tribunal. While the certification process continues to enjoy support in Congress, the Administration appears to favor ending it soon, as well as shifting responsibility for prosecuting war crimes from the ICTY to local courts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conducting Foreign Relations Without Authority: The Logan Act

Conducting Foreign Relations Without Authority: The Logan Act

Date: February 1, 2006
Creator: Seitzinger, Michael V
Description: The Logan Act was intended to prohibit United States citizens without authority from interfering in relations between the United States and foreign governments. There appear to have been no prosecutions under the Act in its more than 200 year history. However, there have been a number of judicial references to the Act, and it is not uncommon for it to be used as a point of challenge concerning dealings with foreign officials. Although attempts have been made to repeal the Act, it remains law and at least a potential sanction to be used against anyone who without authority interferes in the foreign relations of the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conference Committee and Related Procedures: An Introduction

Conference Committee and Related Procedures: An Introduction

Date: December 2, 2010
Creator: Rybicki, Elizabeth
Description: This report is a brief summary of House and Senate procedures for reaching agreement on legislation. It discusses the provisions of House Rule XXII and Senate Rule XXVIII as well as other applicable rules, precedents, and practices. The report focuses on the most common and customary procedures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conference Committee and Related Procedures: An Introduction

Conference Committee and Related Procedures: An Introduction

Date: July 29, 1996
Creator: Bach, Stanley
Description: Conference committees generally are free to conduct their negotiations as they choose, but they are to address only the matters on which the House and Senate have disagreed. Moreover, they are to propose settlements that represent compromises between the positions of the two houses. When they have completed their work, they submit a conference report and joint explanatory statement, and the House and Senate vote on accepting the report without amendments. Sometimes conference reports are accompanied by amendments that remain in disagreement. Only after the two houses have reached complete agreement on all provisions of a bill can it be sent to the President for his approval or veto.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conference Reports and Joint Explanatory Statements

Conference Reports and Joint Explanatory Statements

Date: January 24, 2001
Creator: Bach, Stanley
Description: The conference report presents the formal legislative language on which the conference committee has agreed. The joint explanatory statement explains the various elements of the conferees’ agreement in relation to the positions that the House and Senate had committed to the conference committee.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conference Reports and Joint Explanatory Statements

Conference Reports and Joint Explanatory Statements

Date: February 28, 2003
Creator: Bach, Stanley & Davis, Christopher M
Description: The conference report presents the formal legislative language on which the conference committee has agreed. The joint explanatory statement explains the various elements of the conferees’ agreement in relation to the positions that the House and Senate had committed to the conference committee.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Confirmation of U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations in Presidential Election Years

Confirmation of U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations in Presidential Election Years

Date: July 12, 2012
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & McMillion, Barry J.
Description: This report seeks to help inform the debate regarding how many U.S. circuit and district court nominations should be confirmed by year's end, and how late in the year the Senate should continue to confirm them. It includes analysis of the number and timing of circuit court and district court nominations confirmed by the Senate in presidential election years from 1980 to 2008, as well as a comparison of the processing of judicial nominations during these years, using various quantitative measures. It also relates the findings to the Senate's processing of judicial nominations in 2012, as of June 30.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department