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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Resource Type: Report
 Decade: 1950-1959
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Reports
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of related full-scale propellers having different blade-section cambers

Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of related full-scale propellers having different blade-section cambers

Date: January 1, 1957
Creator: Maynard, Julian D & Salters, Leland B , Jr
Description: Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale two-blade NACA 10-(10)(08)-03 (high camber) propeller have been made for a range of blade angles from 20 degrees to 55 degrees at airspeeds up to 500 miles per hour. The results of these tests have been compared with results from previous tests of the NACA 10-(3) (08)-03 (low camber) and NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 (medium camber) propellers to evaluate the effects of blade-section camber on propeller aerodynamic characteristics.
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Aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail flying-boat hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes

Aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail flying-boat hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes

Date: January 1, 1953
Creator: Riebe, John M & Naeseth, Rodger L
Description: An investigation was made in the Langley 300 mph 7-by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes. For comparison, tests were made on a streamline body simulating the fuselage of a modern transport airplane. The results of the tests, which include the interference effects of a 21-percent-thick support wing, indicated that for corresponding configurations the hull models incorporating a forebody with a length-beam ratio of 7 had lower minimum drag coefficients than the hull models incorporating a forebody with a length-beam ratio of 5. Longitudinal and lateral stability was generally about the same for all hull models tested and about the same as that of a conventional hull.
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Aerodynamic forces and loadings on symmetrical circular-arc airfoils with plain leading-edge and plain trailing-edge flaps

Aerodynamic forces and loadings on symmetrical circular-arc airfoils with plain leading-edge and plain trailing-edge flaps

Date: January 1, 1953
Creator: Cahill, Jones F; Underwood, William J; Nuber, Robert J & Cheesman, Gail A
Description: An investigation has been made in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence tunnel and in the Langley two-dimensional low-pressure tunnel of 6- and 10-percent-thick symmetrical circular-arc airfoil sections at low Mach numbers and several Reynolds numbers. The airfoils were equipped with 0.15-chord plain leading-edge flaps and 0.20-chord plan trailing-edge flaps. The section lift and pitching-moment characteristics were determined for both airfoils with the flaps deflected individually and in combination. The section drag characteristics were obtained for the 6-percent-thick airfoil with the flaps partly deflected as low-drag-control flaps and for airfoils with the flaps neutral. Surface pressures were measured on the 6-percent-thick airfoil section with the flaps deflected either individually or in appropriate combination to furnish flap load and hinge-moment data applicable to the structural design of the airfoil. A generalized method is developed that permits the determination of the chordwise pressure distribution over sharp-edge airfoils with plain leading-edge flaps and plain trailing-edge flaps of arbitrary size and deflection.
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The aerodynamic forces on slender plane- and cruciform-wing and body combinations

The aerodynamic forces on slender plane- and cruciform-wing and body combinations

Date: January 1, 1950
Creator: Spreiter, John R
Description: The load distribution, forces, and moments are calculated theoretically for inclined slender wing-body combinations consisting of a slender body of revolution and either a plane or cruciform arrangement of low-aspect-ratio pointed wings. The results are applicable at subsonic and transonic speeds, and at supersonic speeds, provided the entire wing-body combination lies near the center of the Mach cone.
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Air forces and moments on triangular and related wings with subsonic leading edges oscillating in supersonic potential flow

Air forces and moments on triangular and related wings with subsonic leading edges oscillating in supersonic potential flow

Date: January 1, 1952
Creator: Watkins, Charles E & Berman, Julian N
Description: This analysis treats the air forces and moments in supersonic potential flow on oscillating triangular wings and a series of sweptback and arrow wings with subsonic leading edges and supersonic trailing edges. For the wings undergoing sinusoidal torsional oscillations simultaneously with vertical translations, the linearized velocity potential is derived in the form of a power series in terms of a frequency parameter. This method can be useful for treatment of similar problems for other plan forms and for wings undergoing other sinusoidal motions. For triangular wings, as many terms of such a series expansion as may be derived can be determined; however, the terms after the first few become very cumbersome. Closed expressions that include the reduced frequency to the fifth power, an order which is sufficient for a large class of practical application, are given for the velocity potential and for the components of chordwise section force and moment coefficients. These wings are found to exhibit the possibility of undamped torsional oscillations for certain ranges of Mach number and locations of the axis of rotation. The ranges of these parameters are delineated for triangular wings.
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Airfoil profiles for minimum pressure drag at supersonic velocities -- general analysis with application to linearized supersonic flow

Airfoil profiles for minimum pressure drag at supersonic velocities -- general analysis with application to linearized supersonic flow

Date: January 1, 1952
Creator: Chapman, Dean R
Description: A theoretical investigation is made of the airfoil profile for minimum pressure drag at zero lift in supersonic flow. In the first part of the report a general method is developed for calculating the profile having the least pressure drag for a given auxiliary condition, such as a given structural requirement or a given thickness ratio. The various structural requirements considered include bending strength, bending stiffness, torsional strength, and torsional stiffness. No assumption is made regarding the trailing-edge thickness; the optimum value is determined in the calculations as a function of the base pressure. To illustrate the general method, the optimum airfoil, defined as the airfoil having minimum pressure drag for a given auxiliary condition, is calculated in a second part of the report using the equations of linearized supersonic flow.
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Analog study of interacting and noninteracting multiple-loop control systems for turbojet engines

Analog study of interacting and noninteracting multiple-loop control systems for turbojet engines

Date: January 1, 1955
Creator: Pack, George J & Phillips, W E , Jr
Description: The results of an analog investigation of several turbojet-engine control configurations is presented in this report. Both proportional and proportional-plus-integral controllers were studied, and compensating terms for engine interaction were added to the control system. Data were obtained on the stability limits and the transient responses of these various configurations. Analytical expressions in terms of the component transfer functions were developed for the configurations studied, and the optimum form for the compensation terms was determined. It was found that the addition of the integral term, while making the system slower and more oscillatory, was desirable in that it made the final values of the system parameters independent of source of disturbance and also eliminated droop in these parameters. Definite improvement in system characteristics resulted from the use of proper compensation terms. At comparable gain points the compensated system was faster and more stable. Complete compensation eliminated engine interaction, permitting each loop to be developed to an optimum point independently.
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Analysis and calculation by integral methods of laminar compressible boundary-layer with heat transfer and with and without pressure gradient

Analysis and calculation by integral methods of laminar compressible boundary-layer with heat transfer and with and without pressure gradient

Date: January 1, 1955
Creator: Morduchow, Morris
Description: A survey of integral methods in laminar-boundary-layer analysis is first given. A simple and sufficiently accurate method for practical purposes of calculating the properties (including stability) of the laminar compressible boundary layer in an axial pressure gradient with heat transfer at the wall is presented. For flow over a flat plate, the method is applicable for an arbitrarily prescribed distribution of temperature along the surface and for any given constant Prandtl number close to unity. For flow in a pressure gradient, the method is based on a Prandtl number of unity and a uniform wall temperature. A simple and accurate method of determining the separation point in a compressible flow with an adverse pressure gradient over a surface at a given uniform wall temperature is developed. The analysis is based on an extension of the Karman-Pohlhausen method to the momentum and the thermal energy equations in conjunction with fourth- and especially higher degree velocity and stagnation-enthalpy profiles.
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An analysis of base pressure at supersonic velocities and comparison with experiment

An analysis of base pressure at supersonic velocities and comparison with experiment

Date: January 1, 1951
Creator: Chapman, Dean R
Description: In the first part of the investigation an analysis is made of base pressure in an inviscid fluid, both for two-dimensional and axially symmetric flow. It is shown that for two-dimensional flow, and also for the flow over a body of revolution with a cylindrical sting attached to the base, there are an infinite number of possible solutions satisfying all necessary boundary conditions at any given free-stream Mach number. For the particular case of a body having no sting attached only one solution is possible in an inviscid flow, but it corresponds to zero base drag. Accordingly, it is concluded that a strictly inviscid-fluid theory cannot be satisfactory for practical applications. An approximate semi-empirical analysis for base pressure in a viscous fluid is developed in a second part of the investigation. The semi-empirical analysis is based partly on inviscid-flow calculations.
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An analysis of laminar free-convection flow and heat transfer about a flat plate paralled to the direction of the generating body force

An analysis of laminar free-convection flow and heat transfer about a flat plate paralled to the direction of the generating body force

Date: January 1, 1953
Creator: Ostrach, Simon
Description: The free-convection flow and heat transfer (generated by a body force) about a flat plate parallel to the direction of the body force are formally analyzed and the type of flow is found to be dependent on the Grashof number alone. For large Grashof numbers (which are of interest in aeronautics), the flow is of the boundary-layer type and the problem is reduced in a formal manner, which is analogous to Prandtl's forced-flow boundary-layer theory, to the simultaneous solution of two ordinary differential equations subject to the proper boundary conditions. Velocity and temperature distributions for Prandtl numbers of 0.01, 0.72, 0.733, 1, 1, 10, 100, and 1000 are computed, and it is shown that velocities and Nusselt numbers of the order of magnitude of those encountered in forced-convection flows may be obtained in free-convection flows. The theoretical and experimental velocity and temperature distributions are in good agreement. A flow and a heat-transfer parameter, from which the important physical quantities such as shear stress and heat-transfer rate can be computed, are derived as functions of Prandtl number alone.
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