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Effective Theories Of The Strong Interaction

Effective Theories Of The Strong Interaction

Date: July 31, 2004
Creator: Kolck, Dr. Ubirajara van
Description: This is the final report corresponding to the full funding period (08/01-07/04) in the Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator Grant DE-FG03-01ER41196. The development of an understanding of the interplay between perturbative and non-perturbative effects in strong-interacting systems forms the broad context of this research. The main thrust is the application of effective theories to QCD. Topics included a new power counting in the pionful effective theory, low-energy Compton scattering, charge-symmetry breaking in pion production and in the two-nucleon potential, parity violation, coupled-channel scattering, shallow resonances and halo nuclei, chiral symmetry in the baryon spectrum, existence of a tetraquark state, and molecular meson states. DOE grant DE-FG03-01ER41196 was used to partially support in the period 08/01-07/04 the research activities of the Principal Investigator, Dr. Ubirajara van Kolck, one post-doctoral research associate, Dr. Boris A. Gelman, and one graduate student, Mr. Will Hockings. During the grant period the PI was first Assistant then Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Arizona (UA), and a RHIC Physics Fellow at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center (RBRC). The association with RBRC ended in the Summer of 2004. Since September of 2002 the PI has also been partially supported by a Sloan Research Fellowship. Dr. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effective theory approach to unstable particles

Effective theory approach to unstable particles

Date: May 19, 2003
Creator: Zanderighi, Giulia
Description: The authors present a novel treatment of resonant massive particles appearing as intermediate states in high energy collisions. The approach uses effective field theory methods to treat consistently the instability of the intermediate resonant state. As a result gauge invariance is respected in every step and calculations can in principle be extended to all orders in perturbation theory, the only practical limitation in going to higher orders being the standard difficulties related to multi-loop integrals. The authors believe that the longstanding problem related to the treatment of instability of particles is now solved.
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Effective thermal conductivities of magnesium oxide stainless steel, and uranium oxide powders

Effective thermal conductivities of magnesium oxide stainless steel, and uranium oxide powders

Date: October 29, 1953
Creator: Eian, C S & Deissler, R G
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effective thermal conductivity method for predicting spent nuclear fuel cladding temperatures in a dry fill gas

Effective thermal conductivity method for predicting spent nuclear fuel cladding temperatures in a dry fill gas

Date: December 19, 1997
Creator: Bahney, Robert
Description: This paper summarizes the development of a reliable methodology for the prediction of peak spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature within the waste disposal package. The effective thermal conductivity method replaces other older methodologies.
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Effective thermal conductivity of a thin composite material

Effective thermal conductivity of a thin composite material

Date: December 1996
Creator: Phelan, P. E. & Niemann, R. C.
Description: The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thickness. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relatively low thermal conductivity. Results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity increases with decreasing thickness, while above the threshold the thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between filler and matrix thermal conductivities.
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Effective thermal conductivity of a thin, randomly oriented composite material

Effective thermal conductivity of a thin, randomly oriented composite material

Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Phelan, P.E. & Niemann, R.C.
Description: The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thicknesses. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relative low thermal conductivity. The results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between the filler and matrix thermal conductivities.
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Effective transmissivity of two-dimensional fracture networks

Effective transmissivity of two-dimensional fracture networks

Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Zimmerman, R.W. & Bodvarsson, G.S.
Description: Many of the sites that have been proposed as potential locations of underground radioactive waste repositories contain fractured rocks. For example, both the saturated and unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contains many hydrogeologic units that are extensively fractured. When modeling the hydrological behavior of these sites, for either the purpose of site characterization of performance assessment, computational grid-blocks are often used that contain large number of fractures. In order to treat these as equivalent continua, it is necessary to develop a procedure for relating the hydraulic properties of the individual fractures and he topology of the fracture network to the overall scale permeability. One aspect of this problem is that of determining the in situ hydraulic properties of the individual fractures. Another aspect is to reconstruct the three-dimensional geometry of the fracture network based on borehole or outcrop measurements. The final stage in the problem is that of taking a network of known geometry and determining it effective scale conductivity. The purpose of this paper is to describe a simple procedure for solving this latter problem,a nd to demonstrate it use in cases of both saturated and unsaturated flow. The TOUGH simulator was used.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effective use of environmental impact assessments (EIAs) for geothermal development projects

Effective use of environmental impact assessments (EIAs) for geothermal development projects

Date: May 28, 2000
Creator: Goff, S.J.
Description: Both the developed and developing nations of the world would like to move toward a position of sustainable development while paying attention to the restoration of natural resources, improving the environment, and improving the quality of life. The impacts of geothermal development projects are generally positive. It is important, however, that the environmental issues associated with development be addressed in a systematic fashion. Drafted early in the project planning stage, a well-prepared Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can significantly add to the quality of the overall project. An EIA customarily ends with the decision to proceed with the project. The environmental analysis process could be more effective if regular monitoring, detailed in the EIA, continues during project implementation. Geothermal development EIAs should be analytic rather than encyclopedic, emphasizing the impacts most closely associated with energy sector development. Air quality, water resources and quality, geologic factors, and socioeconomic issues will invariably be the most important factors. The purpose of an EIA should not be to generate paperwork, but to enable superb response. The EIA should be intended to help public officials make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences and take proper actions. The EIA process has been defined ...
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Effective use of metrics in an ALARA program

Effective use of metrics in an ALARA program

Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Bates, B.B. Jr.
Description: ALARA radiological protection programs require metrics to meet their objectives. Sources of metrics include; external dosimetry; internal dosimetry; radiological occurrences from the occurrence reporting and processing system (ORPS); and radiological incident reports (RIR). The sources themselves contain an abundance of specific ``indicators``. To choose the site-specific indicators that will be tracked and trended requires careful review. This required the end users to expend valuable time and effort to locate the data they needed. To address this problem, a central metrics database has been developed so that customers can have all their questions addressed quickly and correctly. The database was developed in the beginning to answer some of the customer`s most frequently asked questions. It is now also a tool to communicate the status of the radiation protection program to facility managers. Finally it also addresses requirements contained in the Rad Con manual and the 10CFR835 implementation guides. The database uses currently available, ``user friendly``, software and contains information from RIR`s, ORPS, and external dosimetry records specific to ALARA performance indicators. The database is expandable to allow new metrics input. Specific reports have been developed to assist customers in their tracking and trending of ALARA metrics.
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Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

Date: December 9, 1998
Creator: Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A. & Ricco, A.J.
Description: To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.
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