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  Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Süleymaniye Mosque Dome]

[Süleymaniye Mosque Dome]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of the interior of the Süleymaniye Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey. The ceiling of the mosque is visible in the foreground filled with domes and windows. The mosque was designed by Mimar Sinan.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sultan and his Court, illustration from Shahnama (Book of Kings), written by Abu'l-Qasim Manur Firdawsi

Sultan and his Court, illustration from Shahnama (Book of Kings), written by Abu'l-Qasim Manur Firdawsi

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 1330~
Creator: unknown
Description: The sultan surrouned by his court are depicted on this manuscript leaf. Thirteen figures face the sultan who is seated on a large red throne.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Summer

Summer

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 1563
Creator: Giuseppe Arcimboldo
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Summer

Summer

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 1563
Creator: Giuseppe Arcimboldo
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Summer Palace]

[Summer Palace]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of the Summer Palace in Beijing, China. Two men walk along a fence-lined pathway in the foreground. White flowers are visible on both sides of the pathway. Part of a building is visible behind the walkway.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Summer Palace]

[Summer Palace]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of the Summer Palace in Beijing, China. In the foreground an ornately decorated pavilion is visible. Multiple people are visible inside and outside the pavilion. Trees are visible in the background.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Summer Palace Roofs]

[Summer Palace Roofs]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of roofs in the Summer Palace of Beijing, China. Multiple tile roofs intersect the image. Trees are visible behind the roofs.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sun: Studio 321

Sun: Studio 321

Date: ~1985
Creator: Crowell-Hilde, Kaki D.
Description: This two-panel woven artwork depicts several gold angular spear shapes that jut downward vertically and break apart in two pieces. Weaving through and around the gold and orange vertical spears are two long two-toned ribbons. The background is purple with a few light blue streaks.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sunbonnet

Sunbonnet

Date: 1900/1909
Creator: unknown
Description: Sunbonnet of off-white calico cotton with a tiny repeated print of three stylized leaves in brown. The brim of the hat is quilted in L-shaped rows of stitching and is very stiff from starch and stiffening material within it. The crown is gathered along the entire length of the seam where it attaches to the brim. The crown and tail are formed from a single piece of fabric, and the tail is stitched flat to the lower sides of brim. The neck is adjustable, having outer neck ties stitched to the lower corners of the brim on both sides. The chin ties are of the same fabric, with unfinished edges. The long tail on the bonnet indicates that it was used as a field bonnet. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sunbonnet

Sunbonnet

Date: 1910
Creator: unknown
Description: Sunbonnet of blue cotton with white lace trim. The brim is slightly square-shaped and heavily starched. The top of the crown is stitched to the brim in a flat seam, with fullness created in the lower crown through a set of 3 snaps on each side which fasten the crown to the brim, giving the lower crown a crenelated shape. The bonnet has no tail, and has self-fabric chin ties of blue ribbon. The left tie is formed from two pieces of fabric pieced together, while the right tie is of a single length of fabric. The ties are narrow hemmed, except for one side of a lower section of left tie, which is cut along the selvage and left unfinished. There are no labels or marks in the piece. The fact that this bonnet does not have a tail probably indicates that this was a visiting bonnet rather than a field bonnet. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design