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  Partner: UNT College of Information
 Department: Learning Technologies
The Development and Assessment of an Instrument for Measuring Mental Model Styles in Korea

The Development and Assessment of an Instrument for Measuring Mental Model Styles in Korea

Date: 2012
Creator: Chermack, Thomas J.; Song, Ji Hoon; Nimon, Kim F.; Choi, Myungweon & Korte, Russel F.
Description: This article discusses a research study on the development and assessment of an instrument for measuring mental model styles in Korea. Abstract: This research study documents the development and validation of a new instrument for measuring individual mental model styles. In particular, the instrument is developed for use in organizational performance and change settings. Existing approaches to accessing and assessing mental models are reviewed, and the conclusion is drawn that none are survey-based, quantitative measures useful in organizational settings. Instrument development procedures with an expert panel are described, as well as data collection and analysis. The resulting instrument is provided along with exploratory factor analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis results. Recommendations for further research and establishing continued validity are provided.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
Cross-Cultural Training and Success Versus Failure of Expatriates

Cross-Cultural Training and Success Versus Failure of Expatriates

Date: 2012
Creator: Joshua-Gojer, Ashwini Esther
Description: This article discusses cross-cultural training (CCT) and success versus failure of expatriates. Abstract: The past few decades has seen an explosion in research on expatriates and CCT. There has been controversy and an unending debate on the goals, effectiveness, implementation, and processes of CCT. There are very few reviews that have condensed literature detailing the best practices of CCT. This review also details the success and failure of expatriates. The antecedents or moderators that play a role in the evaluation of success and failure have been outlined in this literature review. It also brings to light certain solutions that will make CCT more effective and provides directions for future research.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
Exploring Learner to Content Interaction as a Success Factor in Online Courses

Exploring Learner to Content Interaction as a Success Factor in Online Courses

Date: October 2012
Creator: Zimmerman, Tekeisha Denise
Description: This article discusses exploring learner to content interaction as a success factor in online courses. Abstract: Interaction plays a critical role in the learning process. For online course participants, interaction with the course content (learner-content interaction) is especially important because it can contribute to successful learning outcomes and course completion. This study aims to examine the relationship between learner-content interaction and course grade to determine if this interaction type is a contributing success factor. Data related to student interaction with course content, including time spent reviewing online course materials, such as module PowerPoint presentations and course videos and time spent completing weekly quizzes, were collected for students in three sections of an online course (N = 139). The data were then correlated against grades achieved in the course to determine if there was any relationship. Findings indicate statistically significant relationships between the amount of time the learner spent with the content and weekly quiz grades (r = .-72). The study concludes that learners who spent more time interacting with course content achieve higher grades than those who spent less time with the content.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
[Review] Collaborate: The Art of We

[Review] Collaborate: The Art of We

Date: 2012
Creator: Joshua-Gojer, Ashwini Esther
Description: This book review discusses 'Collaborate: The Art of We' by Dan Sanker. The phenomenon of collaboration is getting popular in organizations; however while it is not a new buzzword, it is gaining more mileage because of the changes we see around us. In his book 'Collaborate: The Art of We' (2012), author Dan Sanker makes the case for social Darwinism - the constant battle for survival - by stating that in the coming decades, the fittest will be the ones who know how to collaborate. In today's global economy, time is of essence, as is quality. The book is timely because in the light of the present economy, collaboration is not just a best practice, but an essential practice for performance.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
The "Triple-P" Domains of Ethical Behavior for Higher Education

The "Triple-P" Domains of Ethical Behavior for Higher Education

Date: February 2013
Creator: Mayes, Robin
Description: This paper was awarded a Nicholas and Anna Ricco Ethics Award for 2013. In this paper, the author discusses the "Triple-P" domains of ethical behavior: (1) the understanding of privacy ethics, (2) regards to piracy and plagiarism, and (3) pilfering and profiteering.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
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