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An Experimental Study to Compare Audio-Tutorial Instruction with Traditional Instruction in Beginning Typewriting

An Experimental Study to Compare Audio-Tutorial Instruction with Traditional Instruction in Beginning Typewriting

Date: August 1974
Creator: Jones, Arvella
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Experimental Synchronization of Chaotic Attractors Using Control

Experimental Synchronization of Chaotic Attractors Using Control

Date: December 1994
Creator: Newell, Timothy C. (Timothy Charles)
Description: The focus of this thesis is to theoretically and experimentally investigate two new schemes of synchronizing chaotic attractors using chaotically operating diode resonators. The first method, called synchronization using control, is shown for the first time to experimentally synchronize dynamical systems. This method is an economical scheme which can be viably applied to low dimensional dynamical systems. The other, unidirectional coupling, is a straightforward means of synchronization which can be implemented in fast dynamical systems where timing is critical. Techniques developed in this work are of fundamental importance for future problems regarding high dimensional chaotic dynamical systems or arrays of mutually linked chaotically operating elements.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Experimental Technique for the Objective Quantification of Body-Image Distortion

An Experimental Technique for the Objective Quantification of Body-Image Distortion

Date: July 1971
Creator: Lemon, James M.
Description: The purpose of this study was to develop an experimental technique to objectively measure the deviation between an individual's perception of his body image and his actual image. In addition, this technique was utilized to compare the accuracy of perception of body image between institutionalized and non-institutionalized individuals. Half of each subject category was also compared in terms of performance on an additional perceptual task unrelated to body image.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Experimental Treatment of Inaccurate Singers in the Intermediate Grades

An Experimental Treatment of Inaccurate Singers in the Intermediate Grades

Date: August 1945
Creator: Allen, Sheila Emery
Description: A study of the causes and remedial treatment of inaccurate singing through experimentation and research was chosen by the writer as a practical problem urgently in need of solution.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Experimental Trichinosis in Birds

Experimental Trichinosis in Birds

Date: December 1970
Creator: Poon, Yau-Lun
Description: This work concerns itself with essentially four experiments: (1) the cecum-injective-infection experiment; (2) the anus-injective-infection experiment; (3) the mouth ingestive-infection with larvae, and (4) the mouth ingestive-infection with the flesh of infected rats.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Expert System Approach to the Evaluation of Hypertext Engineering : An Experiment with KnowledgePro and MaxThink's

An Expert System Approach to the Evaluation of Hypertext Engineering : An Experiment with KnowledgePro and MaxThink's

Date: December 1991
Creator: Pak, Min Sun
Description: The purpose of this study is to create the prototype expert system, HEES, and to examine its usability and usefulness in evaluating hypertext software.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Expertise Revisited: Reflecting on the Intersection of Science and Democracy in the Case of Fracking

Expertise Revisited: Reflecting on the Intersection of Science and Democracy in the Case of Fracking

Date: December 2015
Creator: Ahmadi, Mahdi
Description: This dissertation aims to explain the conditions under which expertise can undermine democratic decision making. I argue that the root of the conflict between expertise and democracy lies in what I call insufficiently “representative” expertise – that is forms of scientific research that are not relevant to the policy questions at hand and that fail to make visible their hidden values dimensions. I claim that the scholarly literature on the problem of expertise fails to recognize and address the issue correctly, because it does not open the black box of scientific methodologies. I maintain that only by making sense of the methodological choices of experts in the context of policy making can we determine the relevance of research and reveal the hidden socio-political values and consequences. Using the case of natural gas fracking, I demonstrate how expert contributions – even though epistemically sound – can muddle democratic policy processes. I present four case studies from controversies about fracking to show how to contextualize scientific methodologies in the pertinent political process. I argue that the common problem across all case studies is the failure of expertise to sufficiently represent stakeholders’ problems and concerns. In this context, “representation” has three criteria: (1) ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Expertness and Similarity as Factors of Influence in the Preferences of Deaf College Students for Therapists

Expertness and Similarity as Factors of Influence in the Preferences of Deaf College Students for Therapists

Date: August 1982
Creator: Thigpen, Sally Elizabeth
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Explaining Buyer Opportunism in Business-to-Business Relationships

Explaining Buyer Opportunism in Business-to-Business Relationships

Date: May 2007
Creator: Hawkins, Timothy Glenn
Description: The interaction among firms in the supply chain is necessary for business process execution and relationship success. One phenomenon of great significance to buyer-supplier relationships is opportunism. Opportunism is defined as behavior that is self-interest seeking with guile. It is manifested in behaviors such as stealing, cheating, dishonesty, and withholding information. Opportunism negatively impacts relational exchange tenets such as trust, commitment, cooperation, and satisfaction. Furthermore, perceptions of opportunism negatively affect firm performance. In lieu of the known negative effects of opportunistic behavior on buyer-supplier relationships, why do agents continue to engage in opportunistic tactics with their exchange partners? A comprehensive examination is necessary in order to understand why sourcing professionals engage in acts of opportunism. Understanding why opportunism occurs will reveal how to deter it, and this remains a gap in the literature. Based on theories in economics, marketing channels, supply chain management, decision science, and psychology, a comprehensive model tested a set of factors hypothesized to drive the use of opportunistic tactics. Factors include buyer-supplier relationship-specific factors, environmental factors, individual personality-related factors, and situational factors. Data was collected via internet survey of sourcing professionals from private industry and government agencies. Common to many studies of ethics, respondents made choices ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Explaining Economic Development Strategies Using Product Differentiation Theory: a Reconceptualization of Competition Among City Governments

Explaining Economic Development Strategies Using Product Differentiation Theory: a Reconceptualization of Competition Among City Governments

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2015
Creator: Overton, Michael R
Description: Local governments do not operate in a vacuum. Instead, they are part of a complex “polycentric” system of governments where politically autonomous and self-ruled cities compete with one another over taxable wealth. Missing from the scholarship on metropolitan governance is an understanding of the factors driving competition among local governments. The purpose of this dissertation is to fill this gap by examining how interjurisdictional competition over economic development impacts a city’s choice of strategies for attracting business and residential investment and how those strategies affect revenue collection. First, this dissertation examines whether cities, knowing the economic development strategies of their neighboring cities, pursue similar types of businesses? Or do cities strategically target different types of businesses as a way to avoid the negative consequences of competition? Second, this dissertation explores what impact the decision to pursue similar or dissimilar businesses has on the revenue collection of local governments. Using spatial data analysis to analyze a sample of 2,299 cities, this dissertation finds general support for both theoretical frameworks presented. Overall, the findings from both analyses provide unique insights into metropolitan governance and interjurisdictional competition.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries