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Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Severe Intensity Exercise

Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Severe Intensity Exercise

Date: May 2000
Creator: Blumoff, Sonja
Description: The purpose of this study was to describe mathematically the oxygen uptake kinetics during cycle ergometry, and to examine the effect of intensity on the kinetic responses within the severe domain. Sixteen volunteers performed a series of exercise tests at a range of intensities selected to elicit fatigue in ~3 to 10 min. A simple mono-exponential model effectively described the response across all intensities. There was a positive correlation between the response time and the time to fatigue, demonstrating that the maximal oxygen uptake was achieved faster at higher intensities within the severe domain. Models incorporating two components effectively described the responses only in tests lasting 8 min or more. It was concluded that there is a second, slow component in the oxygen uptake response only at the lower intensities within the severe domain.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ozone

Ozone

Date: 2002
Creator: NASA Earth Observatory
Description: The term "ozone depletion" means more than just the natural destruction of ozone, it means that ozone loss is exceeding ozone creation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ozone

Ozone

Date: 2002
Creator: NASA Earth Observatory
Description: In the stratosphere, ozone is created primarily by ultraviolet radiation. When high-energy ultraviolet rays strike ordinary oxygen molecules (O2), they split the molecule into two single oxygen atoms, known as atomic oxygen. A freed oxygen atom then combines with another oxygen molecule to form a molecule of ozone. There is so much oxygen in our atmosphere, that these high-energy ultraviolet rays are completely absorbed in the stratosphere.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ozone

Ozone

Date: 2002
Creator: NASA Earth Observatory
Description: Although it represents only a tiny fraction of the atmosphere, ozone is crucial for life on Earth. Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ozone

Ozone

Date: 2002
Creator: NASA Earth Observatory
Description: The amount and distribution of ozone molecules in the stratosphere varies greatly over the globe. Ozone molecules are transported around the stratosphere much as water clouds are transported in the troposphere. Therefore, scientists observing ozone fluctuations over just one spot could not know whether a change in local ozone levels meant an alteration in global ozone levels, or simply a fluctuation in the concentration over that particular spot. Satellites have given scientists the ability to overcome this problem because they provide a picture of what is happening daily over the entire Earth.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The ozone hole

The ozone hole

Date: 2003
Creator: British Antactic Survey
Description: Discovery of the hole in the ozone layer showed that human activity can have major, and often unexpected impacts on the planet. The destruction of ozone in the stratosphere high above the planet's surface has been brought about as the result of the widespread use of chemicals which under normal conditions are chemically inert and harmless
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The Ozone Layer: Ozone Depletion, Recovery in a Changing Climate, and the "World Avoided"

The Ozone Layer: Ozone Depletion, Recovery in a Changing Climate, and the "World Avoided"

Date: 2008
Creator: U.S. Global Change Research Program
Description: This brochure describes the role of ozone in the stratosphere, and the effect it has on ultraviolet light, as well as how the Montreal Protocol and subsequent laws have affected ozone-depleting pollutants in the atmosphere.
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A.P. Giannini, Marriner Stoddard Eccles, and the changing landscape of American banking

A.P. Giannini, Marriner Stoddard Eccles, and the changing landscape of American banking

Date: May 2000
Creator: Weldin, Sandra J.
Description: The Great Depression elucidated the shortcomings of the banking system and its control by Wall Street. The creation of the Federal Reserve System in 1913 was insufficient to correct flaws in the banking system until the Banking Acts of 1933 and 1935. A.P. Giannini, the American-Italian founder of the Bank of America and Mormon Marriner S. Eccles, chairman of Federal Reserve Board (1935-1949), from California and Utah respectively, successfully worked to restrain the power of the eastern banking establishment. The Banking Act of 1935 was the capstone of their cooperation, a bill that placed open market operations in the hands of the Federal Reserve, thus diminishing the power of the New York Reserve. The creation of the Federal Housing Act, as orchestrated by Eccles, became a source of enormous revenue for Giannini. Giannini's wide use of branch banking and mass advertising was his contribution to American banking. Eccles's promotion of compensatory spending and eventual placement of monetary control in the hands of the Federal Reserve Board with Banking Act of 1935 and the Accord of 1951 and Giannini's branch banking diminished the likelihood of another sustained depression. As the Bank of America grew, and as Eccles became more aggressive in ...
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Pablo de Sarasate: His Life, Music, Style of Performance, and Interactions among Other Performers and Composers

Pablo de Sarasate: His Life, Music, Style of Performance, and Interactions among Other Performers and Composers

Date: December 2006
Creator: Lee, Chu-Yunn
Description: Pablo de Sarasate (1844-1908) contributed to the development of violin performance through his innovative virtuosic techniques and popular Spanish characteristics, and his influence on violin performing style remains even in the present day. He composed virtuosic compositions to showcase his excellent technique, and well-known composers of the time such as Camille Saint-Saƫns and Edouardo Lalo composed for him as well. These compositions include not only virtuosity but also Spanish characteristics that were suitable to Sarasate's nationalistic heritage. The combination of Spanish and virtuosic characteristics made these pieces as standard violin repertoire for modern violinists. At the end of the nineteenth century, it was his distinct performance style that broke the boundary of technical virtuosity in violin performing. The following generations - Kreisler, Heihetz, and in the present day, Isaac Permann - developed their performance techniques based on Sarasate's performance style. To examine Saraste's influences and contributions to the development of violin performing style, this dissertation focuses on Sarasate's performance practices, his technical developments, his unique style of playing, and his music to discuss his influences on composers and violinists alike. This study places Sarasate's performance style in the context of nineteenth- and twentieth-century violin performance practices through a discussion of ...
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Painting with Clay

Painting with Clay

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2003
Creator: Pan, Yi-Tze
Description: The body of work created during this exploration indicates that painting approach can actively integrate with the clay element. The main point is the surface manipulation during this process. There are four factors relate to this manipulation: timing, action, style, and size. Overall, the painting approach can be modified to create a truly active relationship with clay element. The final touch by the fire and glazing techniques reflect paintings approach may be used in a variety way to decorate the clay element without any limits. Moreover, the painting approach need not be subordinate to the clay element. It can be used not only to complement the clay, but also to enhance any given clay pieces no matter what the shape is.
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