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Open Access Publishing Fees: Responses, Strategies and Emerging Best Practices
Paper accompanying a poster presentation for the 2013 iConference. This paper discusses research on open access publishing fees and article processing charges. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc146588/
Open Access Publishing Fees: Responses, Strategies and Emerging Best Practices
Poster presented at the 2013 International iConference. This poster discusses research on open access publishing fees and article processing charges. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc146587/
Open Access Publishing Fees: Responses, Strategies and Emerging Trends
Presentation for the 2014 SWALL Annual Meeting. This presentation discusses open access, publishing fees, article processing charges, and research on campus open access funds. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc279701/
Open Access to Our Heritage: The Gateway to Oklahoma History
Presentation on The Gateway to Oklahoma History. The author discusses open access to our heritage and the history, development, workflow, and content of the Gateway to Oklahoma History digital newspaper repository. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc181657/
Open Access to UNT Faculty's Scholarly Publications
This presentation discusses open access policies at the University of North Texas (UNT). The topics include an introduction to open access, a discussion of open access policies, and implementation ideas for workflow and technology support. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc36276/
An Open Economy Model of Pakistan : Relative Effectiveness of Monetary and Fiscal Policy
This thesis examines the relative effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy in Pakistan by utilizing an open economy framework. There is a great need for research about the effectiveness of macroeconomic policies as the knowledge of the relative importance of monetary and fiscal policy could prove useful to policymakers and help them understand the macroeconomic adjustment processes of these policy measures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278353/
Open (Flu) Season: A Case Study of The American Influenza Epidemic of 1918: A Digital Encyclopedia
Book chapter discussing a project by the University of Michigan's Center for the History of Medicine (CHM) in partnership with the University of Michigan Library's MPublishing division, to create an open source digital collection of archival, primary, and interpretive materials related to the history of the 1918 influenza pandemic in the United States. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc307508/
Open Letter to the UNT Community: 2011 Library Budget Status and Impacts - September 27, 2011
Letter to the University of North Texas (UNT) community from the Dean of the UNT Libraries, Dr. Martin Halbert. This letter discusses the 2011 library budget status and impacts. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc333037/
Open Letter to the UNT Community: Planning for FY13 Library Budget Reductions - April 11, 2013
Letter to the University of North Texas (UNT) community from the Dean of the UNT Libraries, Dr. Martin Halbert. This letter discusses planning for the 2013 fiscal year library budget reductions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc333025/
Open Letter to the UNT Community: Planning for FY13 Library Budget Reductions - March 6, 2012
Letter to the University of North Texas (UNT) community from the Dean of the UNT Libraries, Dr. Martin Halbert. This letter discusses planning for the 2013 fiscal year library budget reductions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc333019/
Open Source Components, Standards Conformance, and UCD: Building Blocks for Successfully Managing and Enhancing an Established Digital Archive
This paper discusses open source components, standard conformance, and UCD as it relates to The Portal to Texas History. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc28325/
Open Source Components, Standards Conformance, and UCD: Managing and Enhancing an Established Digital Archive
This presentation is about The Portal to Texas History and the IOGENE project and the strategies and steps involved in their development. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc28354/
The Opened Letter: Rereading Hawthorne
The recent publication of the bulk of Hawthorne's letters has precipitated this study, which deals with Hawthorne's creative and subversive narration and his synchronic appeal to a variety of readers possessing different tastes. The author initially investigates Hawthorne's religion and demonstrate how he disguised his personal religious convictions, ambiguously using the intellectual categories of Calvinism, Unitarianism, and spiritualism to promote his own humanistic "religion." Hawthorne's appropriation of the jeremiad further illustrates his emphasis on religion and narration. Although his religion remained humanistic, he readily used the old Puritan political sermon to describe and defend his own financial hardships. That jeremiad outlook has significant implications for his art. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278343/
Opening Day
Although I've read and written poetry for my own pleasure for about twenty years now, I've only seriously studied and written poetry on a consistent basis for the past two years. In this sense, I still consider myself a beginning poet. When attempting to pursue an art form as refined and historically informed as poetry, only after spending a number of years reading and writing intensively would I no longer consider myself a beginner, but a practitioner of the art. I've grounded my early development as a poet in concision, voice, and imagination, and hope to build upon these ideas with other poetic techniques, theories, and forms as I go forward. I am particularly interested in mastering the sonnet form, a concise and imaginative form that will allow me to further develop my skills. Hopefully, the works in this thesis reflect that effort. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9018/
The Opening Section of Isang Yun's My Land My People: A Cross-Section of Korean and Western Musical Features
Isang Yun's oratorio My Land My People is organized in four movements, and is scored for orchestra, solo voice and choir. Movements are titled as follows: Rjoksa (History), Hyon-Shil I (Presence I), Hyon-shil II (Presence II), and Mi-rae (Future). This document only covers from measures 1-38 of the first section of the first movement of this work. Even though this work is atonal, the composer emphasizes a harmonically moving, tonal sonority: interval class five includes perfect 4th and 5th, quintal-quartal harmony and authentic cadence moving dominant to tonic. Also, in this document, a comparison with Korean traditional music elements is included to support Isang Yun's musical features. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5292/
Opening the Door to Meaning-Making in Secondary Art History Instruction
Each day countless numbers of high school students remain standing at the threshold of the door to meaningful learning in art history because of traditional authoritative instructional methods and content. With the keys of feminist pedagogy, interactive teaching methods, and the new art histories, the teacher can now unlock that door and lead students to personally relevant learning on the other side. A case study using both qualitative and quantitative research methods was conducted in a secondary art history classroom to examine the teacher's pedagogical choices and the degree to which they enable meaningful and relevant student learning. The analysis of multiple sources of data, including classroom observations, revealed statistically significant correlations between the teacher's instructional methods and the content, as well as their impact on student meaning-making. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5244/
Opera at the Threshold of a Revolution: Francis Poulenc’s Dialogues des Carmélites (1953-1956)
Francis Poulenc’s three-act opera Dialogues des Carmélites (1953-1956) depicts the struggles of the novice nun Blanche de la Force during the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution. The use of Latin liturgical music at critical points in the opera conveys the ritualistic nature of Catholic worship. The spiritual message of mystical substitution, along with the closely related notion of vicarious suffering, imbue the opera with a spirituality that offers a sharp contrast to earlier operatic settings of Catholic texts, particularly during the age of grand opera. Marian devotion also plays an important role in the opera. The final tableau of the opera stages the execution of Blanche and her sisters, complete with the sound of a guillotine, with the nuns singing the Salve Regina as they proceed to the scaffold. The multivalence of the final tableau highlights the importance of voice and its absence. While the nuns, onstage spectators, and the guillotine are audibly present in the scene, the priest participates solely through gesture. The surfacing of the Lacanian Real in the silent moment of traumatic shock that follows the guillotine’s first fall allows for intertextual references to the opera in Poulenc’s Sonate pour Flûte et Piano (1957) to function as a work of remembrance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc103288/
Operant Procedures in Marital Treatment
The ability of marital partners to directly change a currently unhappy marriage to a happy one may be a function of each individual's conscious awareness of the topography, frequency, and other parameters of his own behaviors, as well as the effects or consequences these behaviors bring to bear on his spouse. This study was an attempt to combine the use of relevant behavioral awareness and a token economy to rehabilitate a marriage in crisis. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131648/
Operation and Control of a Radiofrequency Ion Source
This thesis examines the operation and control of a radiofrequency ion source. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130340/
The Operation of an Army Air Forces Training Command Commercial (Base) Transportation Office
This study presents the principles that govern commercial transportation, and it shows their relationship to military transportation. In the light of these principles, some concrete methods and procedures are presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70358/
Opinions of Children's Behavior Problems
The problem of this study was to determine and analyze the opinions of a large number of children and their teachers, in both the third and sixth grades of a large suburban school system, regarding the seriousness of forty-seven selected behaviors commonly observed in children. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164387/
Opinions of Turkish immigrants living in Houston about the conflict between secularism and Islam in Turkey.
This study was designed to examine the opinions of Turkish immigrants living in the Houston metropolitan area about the conflict between secularism and Islam in Turkey. The study examined the role of the practice of religion on the opinions about the clash between secularism and Islam. A final sample consisted of 40 immigrants recruited through purposeful and snowball sampling. In-depth interviews and a survey including screening questions were conducted. The results indicated that practice of religion has a partial impact on the opinions of Turkish immigrants about the conflict between secularism and Islam. Future research should further examine if the experience of living abroad for a long period influence Turkish immigrants' opinions about the same issue. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9123/
Opportunities and challenges for the 21st century FDLP
This presentation discusses research on the opportunities and challenges for the 21st century Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP). The authors discuss the principles of the FDLP, the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), LOCKSS-USDOCS, and the University of North Texas (UNT) efforts toward digital FDLP. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86154/
Optical Properties of Christiansen Filter Systems
This thesis examines the optical properties of Christiansen filter systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108100/
Optical Transparent Pmma Composite Reinforced By Coaxial Electrospun Pan Hollow Nanofibers
Electrospinning has been recognized as an efficient technique for the fabrication of polymer fibers. These electrospun fibers have many applications across a broad range of industries. In this research, optical transparent composites were successfully fabricated by embedding polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow nanofibers into poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix. The hollow PAN nanofibers were prepared by coaxial electrospinning. The PAN was used as the shell solution, and the mineral oil was used as the core solution. The resulting fibers were then etched with octane to remove the mineral oil from the core. The hollow PAN fibers were then homogeneously distributed in PMMA resins to fabricate the composite. The morphology, transmittance and mechanical properties of the PAN/PMMA composite were then characterized with an ESEM, TEM, tensile testing machine, UV-vis spectrometer and KD2 Pro Decagon device. The results indicated that the hollow nanofibers have relatively uniform size with one-dimensional texture at the walls. The embedded PAN hollow nanofibers significantly enhanced the tensile stress and the Young's modulus of the composite (increased by 58.3% and 50.4%, respectively), while having little influence on the light transmittance of the composite. The KD2 Pro device indicated that the thermal conductivity of the PMMA was marginally greater than the PAN/PMMA composite by 2%. This novel transparent composite could be used for transparent armor protection, window panes in vehicles and buildings, and airplane windshield etc. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271772/
Optimal Access Point Selection and Channel Assignment in IEEE 802.11 Networks
Designing 802.11 wireless networks includes two major components: selection of access points (APs) in the demand areas and assignment of radio frequencies to each AP. Coverage and capacity are some key issues when placing APs in a demand area. APs need to cover all users. A user is considered covered if the power received from its corresponding AP is greater than a given threshold. Moreover, from a capacity standpoint, APs need to provide certain minimum bandwidth to users located in the coverage area. A major challenge in designing wireless networks is the frequency assignment problem. The 802.11 wireless LANs operate in the unlicensed ISM frequency, and all APs share the same frequency. As a result, as 802.11 APs become widely deployed, they start to interfere with each other and degrade network throughput. In consequence, efficient assignment of channels becomes necessary to avoid and minimize interference. In this work, an optimal AP selection was developed by balancing traffic load. An optimization problem was formulated that minimizes heavy congestion. As a result, APs in wireless LANs will have well distributed traffic loads, which maximize the throughput of the network. The channel assignment algorithm was designed by minimizing channel interference between APs. The optimization algorithm assigns channels in such a way that minimizes co-channel and adjacent channel interference resulting in higher throughput. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4687/
Optimal design of Dutch auctions with discrete bid levels.
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
The theory of auction has become an active research area spanning multiple disciplines such as economics, finance, marketing and management science. But a close examination of it reveals that most of the existing studies deal with ascending (i.e., English) auctions in which it is assumed that the bid increments are continuous. There is a clear lack of research on optimal descending (i.e., Dutch) auction design with discrete bid levels. This dissertation aims to fill this void by considering single-unit, open-bid, first price Dutch auctions in which the bid levels are restricted to a finite set of values, the number of bidders may be certain or uncertain, and a secret reserve price may be present or absent. These types of auctions are most attractive for selling products that are perishable (e.g., flowers) or whose value decreases with time (e.g., air flight seats and concert tickets) (Carare and Rothkopf, 2005). I began by conducting a comprehensive survey of the current literature to identify the key dimensions of an auction model. I then zeroed in on the particular combination of parameters that characterize the Dutch auctions of interest. As a significant departure from the traditional methods employed by applied economists and game theorists, a novel approach is taken by formulating the auctioning problem as a constrained mathematical program and applying standard nonlinear optimization techniques to solve it. In each of the basic Dutch auction model and its two extensions, interesting properties possessed by the optimal bid levels and the auctioneer's maximum expected revenue are uncovered. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the major propositions where appropriate. The superiority of the optimal strategy recommended in this study over two commonly-used heuristic procedures for setting bid levels is also demonstrated both theoretically and empirically. Finally, economic as well as managerial implications of the findings reported in this dissertation research are discussed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc28450/
Optimism, Delay Discounting, and Physical Exercise: The Role of Delay Discounting on Individual Levels of Exercise
Deciding to exercise requires trade-offs between immediate and delayed benefits. These momentary decisions may be moderated by personality such that patterns of individual behavior emerge. The aim of the current study was to determine if higher levels of optimism and lower levels of delay discounting were related to exercise frequency. A sample of 360 undergraduate students completed a survey study related to understanding the choices made by undergraduates and how other factors relate to their decision-making. The survey included measures of optimism, delayed discounting, and self-reported exercise frequency in four domains: cardiovascular, resistance, sports, active lifestyle. Hierarchical linear regression was used to examine optimism and delay discounting as predictors of exercise frequency. Optimism and delay discounting were negatively correlated, but neither was related to exercise frequency. Furthermore, optimism and delay discounting were not significantly related to frequency spent in cardiovascular, resistance, or active lifestyle exercise. However, women scoring higher in delay discounting were more likely to participate in physical sports. The present study helps inform future research by showing potentially important psychosocial variables related to optimism, delay discounting, and exercise. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc30512/
Optimism, Health Locus of Control, and Quality of Life of Women with Initial versus Recurrent Breast Cancer
Health Locus of Control (HLOC) and other predictors of Quality of Life (QL) were examined for women with an initial versus recurrent breast cancer diagnosis. Twenty-eight women with an initial breast cancer (IBC) diagnoses and twenty-eight women with recurrent breast cancer (RBC) diagnoses were recruited from doctors' offices and cancer support groups. Correlational analyses were used to assess the relationships between variables. No significant differences were found between women with IBC and RBC on Psychological QL. Doctor HLOC and Psychological QL were related for women with RBC (r = .481, p = .01) and marginally so for women with IBC (r = .329, p = .09). A positive correlation was also found between Doctor HLOC and Functional QL for both women with IBC (r = .464, p = .01) and women with RBC (r = .390, p = .04). After controlling for stage of cancer, women with RBC reported higher Functional QL than did women with IBC. Advanced (stages III or IV) versus early (stages I or II) cancer stage related to lower Functional QL, controlling for initial versus recurrent diagnosis (r = -.283, p = .01). A marginally significant relationship was also found for cancer stage, regardless of initial versus recurrent diagnosis, with higher Overall QL for women with early stages of breast cancer (r = -.157, p = .09). No significant differences in Optimism or Overall QL were found between women with IBC versus RBC. No differences were found between married and single women. This research begins to explore differences in Quality of Life for women with a new versus a recurrent breast cancer diagnosis. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2803/
Optimization of Cell Culture Procedures for Growing Neural Networks on Microelectrode Arrays
This thesis describes the development of an optimized method for culturing dissociated, monolayer neuronal networks from murine frontal cortex and midbrain. It is presented as a guidebook for use by cell culture specialists and laboratory personnel who require updated and complete procedures for use with microelectrode array (MEA) recording technology. Specific cell culture protocols, contamination prevention and control, as well common problems encountered within the cell culture facility, are discussed. This volume offers value and utility to the rapidly expanding fields of MEA recording and neuronal cell culture. Due to increasing interest in determining the mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease, the newly developed procedures for mesencephalon isolation and culture on MEAs are an important research contribution. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5126/
Optimization Theory in Administrative Analysis
The thesis of this study is that modern optimization theory is a natural extension of classical optimization theory. As such, modern optimization theory will be applied to administrative problems only after interpretive studies are made that provide (1) an explanation of the general theoretical development of the techniques of modern optimization theory, (2) computational algorithms for implementing the techniques of modern optimization theory, (3) detailed demonstrations of the computational aspects of each technique and its corresponding algorithm, and (4) an identification of the types of problems to which these techniques are applicable. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc164428/
Optimizing Non-pharmaceutical Interventions Using Multi-coaffiliation Networks
Computational modeling is of fundamental significance in mapping possible disease spread, and designing strategies for its mitigation. Conventional contact networks implement the simulation of interactions as random occurrences, presenting public health bodies with a difficult trade off between a realistic model granularity and robust design of intervention strategies. Recently, researchers have been investigating the use of agent-based models (ABMs) to embrace the complexity of real world interactions. At the same time, theoretical approaches provide epidemiologists with general optimization models in which demographics are intrinsically simplified. The emerging study of affiliation networks and co-affiliation networks provide an alternative to such trade off. Co-affiliation networks maintain the realism innate to ABMs while reducing the complexity of contact networks into distinctively smaller k-partite graphs, were each partition represent a dimension of the social model. This dissertation studies the optimization of intervention strategies for infectious diseases, mainly distributed in school systems. First, concepts of synthetic populations and affiliation networks are extended to propose a modified algorithm for the synthetic reconstruction of populations. Second, the definition of multi-coaffiliation networks is presented as the main social model in which risk is quantified and evaluated, thereby obtaining vulnerability indications for each school in the system. Finally, maximization of the mitigation coverage and minimization of the overall cost of intervention strategies are proposed and compared, based on centrality measures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271860/
Optimizing Scientific and Social Attributes of Pharmaceutical Take Back Programs to Improve Public and Environmental Health
Research continues to show that pharmaceutical environmental contamination has caused adverse environmental effects, with one of the most studied effects being feminization of fish exposed to pharmaceutical endocrine disruptors. Additionally, there are also public health risks associated with pharmaceuticals because in-home reserves of medications provide opportunities for accidental poisoning and intentional medication abuse. Pharmaceutical take back programs have been seen as a remedy to these concerns; however a thorough review of peer-reviewed literature and publicly available information on these programs indicates limited research has been conducted to validate these programs as a purported solution. Furthermore, there are significant data gaps on key factors relating to take back program participants. The purpose of this dissertation was therefore to address these gaps in knowledge and ultimately determine if take back programs could actually improve public and environmental health. This was accomplished by conducting social and scientific research on a take back program called Denton Drug Disposal Day (D4). Socioeconomic, demographic, and geographic characteristics of D4 participants were investigated using surveys and geographic analysis. Impacts on public health were determined by comparing medications collected at D4 events with medications reported to the North Texas Poison Center as causing adverse drug exposures in Denton County. Impacts to environmental health were determined by monitoring hydrocodone concentrations in wastewater effluent released from Denton’s wastewater treatment plant before and after D4 events. Data collected and analyzed from the D4 events and the wastewater monitoring suggests D4 events were successful in contributing to improvements in public and environmental health; however there was insufficient evidence to prove that D4 events were exclusively responsible for these improvements. An additional interesting finding was that willingness to travel to participate in D4 events was limited to a five to six mile threshold. This geographic information, combined with other findings related to socioeconomic, demographic, and risk perception characteristics of D4 participants, has the potential to help improve the effectiveness of future take back events. This would allow these programs to better meet their common goals of improving both public and environmental health, which this study has shown is achievable to some degree. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc149670/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Collin County Genealogical Society: Focus Group Discussion, July 2008
This report provides information about the IOGENE project. The UNT Libraries received a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in December 2007 for a two-year project to identify the user interface requirements of genealogists interacting with the Libraries' Portal to Texas History. The Portal provides users with a digital gateway to collections in Texas libraries, museums, archives, and historical societies, as well as to private collections. It contains primary source materials, including maps, books, manuscripts, diaries, photographs, and letters. The IOGENE project involves genealogists in the design process beginning with the initial assessment of their requirements and continuing through usability testing of the redesigned Portal interface. The results of this study will provide the library community with information about the needs and interface requirements of a little-studied group of lifelong learners who comprise a significant proportion of digital library users. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32977/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Dallas Genealogical Society: Focus Group 1 Discussion, July 2008
This is a report of the findings from the March 16, 2008 focus group discussion with members of the Dallas Genealogical Society. The UNT Libraries received a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in December 2007 for a two-year project to identify the user interface requirements of genealogists interacting with the Libraries' Portal to Texas history. The IOGENE project involves genealogists in the design process beginning with the initial assessment of their requirements and continuing through usability testing of the redesigned Portal interface. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32978/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Dallas Genealogical Society: Focus Group 2 Discussion, July 2008
This report presents findings from the March 30, 2008 focus group discussion with members of the Dallas Genealogical Society. The UNT Libraries received a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in December 2007 for a two-year project to identify the user interface requirements of genealogists interacting with the Libraries' Portal to Texas history. The IOGENE project involves genealogists in the design process beginning with the initial assessment of their requirements and continuing through usability testing of the redesigned Portal interface. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32979/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Denton County Genealogical Society: Initial Usability Test Results, August 2008
This report presents the findings of usability tests given as part of the IOGENE project. During March and April of 2008, members of the Denton County Genealogical Society participated in usability testing of the existing interface to the Portal. The purpose of the testing was to identify ways in which The Portal to Texas History could be improved to better address genealogists' needs. This report tells the findings from those tests. These findings in conjunction with the findings from focus group discussions held in the spring of 2008 will inform the initial redesign of the Portal's interface. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32985/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Evaluation of Project Outcome: User Satisfaction Report, February 2010
This report presents information about the IOGENE project. The UNT Libraries received a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in December 2007 for a two-year project to identify the user interface requirements of genealogists interacting with the Libraries' Portal to Texas History. This document reports information about the survey questionnaire, the respondents, the research findings, and includes the positive overall outcome regarding user satisfaction with the work conducted in this project. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32984/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Final Project Report, February 2010
This report discusses a research project conducted by the UNT Libraries. The UNT Libraries received a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a two-year study to redesign the interface to The Portal to Texas History, a digital library program at the UNT Libraries. This report opens with background information for the project, describes the project's methods and working model, guides the reader through the project's three phases and associated feedback from the review process, and presents the revised model for application development. The report closes with measures of the project's success as well as reflections on the experience gained and its value for future digital library application development projects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32974/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Functional Requirements for The Portal to Texas History, July 2008
This report includes the results of an initial assessment of genealogists' requirements for the redesign of the Portal's interface. The UNT Libraries received a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a two-year project to identify the user interface requirements of genealogists interacting with the libraries' Portal to Texas History. The IOGENE project involves genealogists in the design process beginning with the initial assessment of their requirements and continuing through usability testing of the redesigned Portal interface. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32980/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Interim Performance Report, December 2008
This report is the second interim performance report for the project titled: Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework. The reporting period is July 1, 2008 through December 31, 2008. The report includes three sections: Interim Goals and Accomplishments, Significant Findings and Accomplishments, and Project Achievements and Lessons Learned. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32972/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Interim Performance Report, July 2008
This report is the first interim performance report for the project titled: Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework. The reporting period is December 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008. The report includes three sections: Interim Goals and Accomplishments, Significant Findings and Accomplishments, and Project Achievements and Lessons Learned. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32981/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Interim Performance Report, July 2009
This report is the third interim performance report for the project titled: Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework. The reporting period is January 1, 2009 through June 30, 2009. The report includes three sections: Goals and Accomplishments, Significant Findings and Accomplishments, and Project Achievements and Lessons Learned. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32973/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Portal to Texas History: Baseline Survey Results, June 2009
This report discusses the questionnaire for the IOGENE Project. From September 26, 2008 through June 26, 2009, an online survey questionnaire captured both demographic data from Portal visitors as well as their opinions regarding the utility of the Portal and their satisfaction with it. The objective of this data collection effort was twofold: to characterize Portal users and to establish baseline measurements for user satisfaction. The survey will be repeated following each of two planned releases of the redesigned Portal, one in the summer of 2009 and the second in the fall of 2009. Comparison of future survey results to the baseline results reported in this paper will be one gauge of the success of the IOGENE project. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32983/
Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework: Usability Tests: Summary Report, February 2010
This is a summary report of the findings of usability tests. The UNT Libraries received a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in December 2007 for a two-year project to identify the user interface requirements of genealogists interacting with the Libraries' Portal to Texas History and to redesign the interface to the Portal to meet those requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc32986/
The Optimum Design of a Broad-band Helix for Use in Electron Spin Resonance
This thesis examines optimum designs for broad-band helix to be used in electron spin resonance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163904/
An Oral Interpreter's Approach to Selected Poetry of Langston Hughes
The purpose of this study was to analyze for oral presentation a selected body of poetry by Langston Hughes. Because Hughes read his own poetry in lecture recitals throughout his career, which spanned more than four decades, it is appropriate that he be considered for such a study. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc131481/
Oral Literature in Africa
This revised edition makes Finnegan’s ground-breaking research available to the next generation of scholars. It includes a new introduction, additional images and an updated bibliography, as well as its original chapters on poetry, prose, "drum language” and drama, and an overview of the social, linguistic and historical background of oral literature in Africa. This volume is complemented by original recordings of stories and songs from the Limba country (Sierra Leone), collected by Finnegan during her fieldwork in the late 1960s, digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc123529/
Oral Syringe Training Animals: Indiscriminable and Discriminable Punishment Contingencies
Animals are commonly trained to perform behaviors during routine husbandry procedures. However, some husbandry procedures have aversive consequences when the real procedure is performed. This commonly results in loss of the trained behavior. The present study assessed whether maintaining the antecedent environmental stimulus conditions between appetitive and aversive outcomes would prevent this effect and, conversely, whether adding a stimulus discrepancy would facilitate this effect. Three domestic rats served as participants in a multiple baseline across participants design with multi-element components. All three rats stopped performing a trained behavior when a discrepant stimulus reliably predicted an aversive outcome. In addition, all three rats continued to perform the same behavior when antecedent environmental stimulus conditions were consistent between aversive and appetitive outcomes. Results are discussed in terms of practical implications for behavior change agents and conceptual implications for learning theory. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271810/
Orchestral Etudes: Repertoire-Specific Exercises for Double Bass
In this project, frequently required double bass orchestral audition excerpts as well as their individual technical difficulties are identified. A survey of professional double bass players and teachers currently and formerly employed by major orchestras, universities, and conservatories have participated to validate the importance of four of the most frequently required orchestral excerpts: Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, Mvt. 4, and Symphony No. 5, Mvt. 3; Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben; and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Symphony No. 40, Mvt. 1. The survey respondents identified the primary and secondary technical concerns of each of the four excerpts. I have created technical studies, or etudes, that specifically address these difficulties and help fill a literary gap within the existing pedagogical resources for the double bass. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84292/