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New Source of Natural Fertilizer Discovered in Oceans
New findings suggest that the deep ocean is teeming with organisms that produce essential natural fertilizers. A National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded research team led by Jonathan Zehr, a marine scientist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has discovered a previously unknown type of photosynthetic bacteria that fixes nitrogen, converting nitrogen from the atmosphere into a form other organisms can use. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11994/
New Surveillance Technologies and the Invasion of Privacy Rights
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Definition of privacy has changed by the changes and improvements in information and surveillance technologies. These changes and improvement need new legal decisions for new kinds of privacy invasions. This study explores the scope of privacy right, particularly when a technological surveillance has occurred by law enforcement agencies. It focuses in particular on increasing law enforcements' surveillance technologies and devices that have the potential to impact citizens' information privacy. These increasing changes in surveillance technologies have important implications both for law enforcements and citizens. This study also discusses increasing law enforcement surveillance for the public's security, changes of the laws that allow law enforcements to use new surveillance powers as a war on terrorism, and the citizens concerns of information privacy. A particular attention is given to the recent public opinion surveys which show citizens' increasing privacy concerns. Finally, a set of recommendations to figure out security-privacy debate and reduce the privacy concerns of the citizens is offered. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4252/
A New Wireless Sensor Node Design for Program Isolation and Power Flexibility
Over-the-air programming systems for wireless sensor networks have drawbacks that stem from fundamental limitations in the hardware used in current sensor nodes. Also, advances in technology make it feasible to use capacitors as the sole energy storage mechanism for sensor nodes using energy harvesting, but most current designs require additional electronics. These two considerations led to the design of a new sensor node. A microcontroller was chosen that meets the Popek and Goldberg virtualization requirements. The hardware design for this new sensor node is presented, as well as a preliminary operating system. The prototypes are tested, and demonstrated to be sustainable with a capacitor and solar panel. The issue of capacitor leakage is considered and measured. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc28378/
New World of Scholarly Publishing
Presentation for the 2013 Summer Cross Timbers Library Collaborative (CTLC) Scholarly Communications and Digital Curation (SCDC) affinity group meeting. This presentation discusses scholarly publishing activities at the University of Michigan (UM) Libraries and library publishing service ideas at the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc304840/
Newer Methods of Removing Taste and Odor Compounds from Water Supplies
This thesis discusses the causes and methods for removing taste and odor compounds from water supplies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc107850/
News photography image retrieval practices: Locus of control in two contexts.
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This is the first known study to explore the image retrieval preferences of news photographers and news photo editors in work contexts. Survey participants (n=102) provided opinions regarding 11 photograph searching methods. The quantitative survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, while content analysis was used to evaluate the qualitative survey data. In addition, news photographers and news photo editors (n=11) participated in interviews. Data from the interviews were analyzed with phenomenography. The survey data demonstrated that most participants prefer searching by events taking place in the photograph, objects that exist in the photograph, photographer-provided keywords, and relevant metadata, such as the date the picture was taken. They also prefer browsing. Respondents had mixed opinions about searching by emotions elicited in a photograph, as well as the environmental conditions represented in a photograph. Participants' lowest-rated methods included color and light, lines and shapes, and depth, shadow, or perspective. They also expressed little interest in technical information about a photograph, such as shutter speed and aperture. Interview participants' opinions about the search methods reflected the survey respondents' views. They discussed other aspects of news photography as well, including the stories told by the pictures, technical concerns about digital photography, and digital archiving and preservation issues. These stated preferences for keyword searching, browsing, and photographer-provided keywords illustrate a desire for a strong internal locus of control in digital photograph archives. Such methods allow users more control over access to their photographs, while the methods deemed less favorable by survey participants offer less control. Participants believe they can best find their photographs if they can control how they index and search for them. Therefore, it would be useful to design online photograph archives that allow users to control representation and access. Future research possibilities include determining the preferences of other image retrieval system users, performing user studies with moving image information retrieval systems, and uniting content-based and concept-based image retrieval research. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5591/
Newspaper Metadata Manual
This document describes the process that the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries' Digital Newspaper Unit (DNU) uses to create metadata for the scanned newspapers published on The Portal to Texas History as part of the Texas Digital Newspaper Program (TDNP). High quality metadata helps users find what they want more quickly. Over time, accurate descriptive metadata fosters trust among the Portal's user community. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc155637/
Newspaper Ownership Structure and the Quality of Local Political News Coverage
This research sought to ascertain how newspaper ownership structures influence the quality of local political news coverage. More specifically, do independently owned newspapers tend to produce larger quantities of quality local political reporting than do corporately owned and publicly traded newspapers? In the thesis, I develop an understanding of "quality" news coverage as being coverage that is thematic, or providing interpretive analysis and supplying contextual information. Additionally, I tackle the question of quality news coverage from three angles: whether or not independently owned newspapers provide more quality local political news stories per edition than corporately owned papers; whether or not the percentage of quality local political news stories of total political news stories within an edition is higher for independently owned or corporately owned newspapers; and whether or not the percentage of total political news stories of total news stories is higher for independently owned or corporately owned newspapers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc115055/
Newspaper Preservation through Collaboration and Communication: The Texas Digital Newspaper Program
Presentation discussing the history and background, external support, communication, technology, and workflow of The Texas Digital Newspaper Program at the University of North Texas Libraries. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc181687/
Newspapers In The 21st Century: How NDNP State Projects Deliver The News
This poster discusses newspapers in the 21st century and how the National Digital Newspapers Program (NDNP) state projects deliver the news. NDNP Awardees' are creating their own digital newspaper sites to provide free access to content digitized through NDNP and beyond. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc155636/
The Next Generation of Creative Commons Licenses, What's New in CC 4.0
This Tech Talk presentation discusses the next generation of Creative Commons (CC) licenses and what is new in CC 4.0. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc284571/
Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α3 mRNA in Rat Visual System After Monocular Deprivation
In situ hybridization was used to examine effects of monocular enucleation on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit cc3 mRNA in the rat dLGNand visual cortex. After 28 days postoperative, there were no significant differences in α3 mRNA density between the contralateral (deprived) and ipsilateral (non-deprived) sides. The lack of obvious effects of visual deprivation on α3 mRNA density suggests that other factors, possibly intrinsic to dLGNand visual cortex, govern the postnatal expression of α3 mRNA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278900/
The “Nigger Trinity”: Engaging the Discourse in Post Civil Rights/Post 1960s America
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The cultural and popular media landscape of the United States of America changed after the Civil-Rights movement of the 1960s. The word “Nigger” was changed during that same period of American history. There are several authors and a comic that helped change this word during the 1960s. The post Civil-Rights American has a different experience and understanding with this word than those born before 1970. This work triangulates the current cultural location of the word “Nigger,” “nigga,” and “the n-word” using linguistics, law, and two media case studies. The “Nigger” trinity is a model that adds value to the discourse that surrounds this one word in post civil-rights/post 1960s America. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc103290/
Night of no Exile
Night of no Exile is a collection of poems preceded by a critical article entitled "‘Exile seems both a blessing and a curse': A Blissful Reading of Li-Young Lee's Poetry." That article discusses Lee's quest to achieve communication, truth, and transcendence through poetic language and concludes that he finally reaches his goal through a leap from narrative poetry to lyricism. The "exile" alluded to in the title of the article is not only geographic, but also interioran exile due to the natural limitations of all languages, and which can be bridged only in linguistic ways. Lee's solution to that problem (lyricism) turns his poetry into what Roland Barthes would call "a text of bliss," a text that manages to deeply destabilize language, while simultaneously achieving a new kind of meaning. In the main body of the manuscript, the first section contains short love lyrics. The second section, "Night of no Exile," is an attempt at the demanding genre of the longer lyric poem. The third section uses short lyrics to explore various topics, such as discovering one's identity, friendship and solidarity between women, family history, and childhood memories. Finally, the last section includes poems, four of them longer, attempting to combine narrative and lyric impulses in a way not unlike Li-Young Lee's experimentation with those two genres. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2217/
The Nightingale in Poetry and Music
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This thesis surveys a variety of songs and arias for high soprano which feature the nightingale; examines the musical elements that symbolize, refer to, or imitate the nightingale; and compares these musical elements with transcriptions of the nightingale's song. The first chapter reviews the symbolic development of the nightingale and its role in poetry and literature. The interior chapters address a selection of musical compositions that feature the nightingale and its song. The final chapter establishes a relationship between the sound of the actual sound of the nightingale and the musical gestures created by composers to imitate the nightingale. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4161/
The Nightingale's Flight from Opera to Symphonic Poem: A Comparative Study of The Nightingale and The Song of the Nightingale by Igor Stravinsky
An analysis of the transformation from Stravinsky's opera The Nightingale to The Song of the Nightingale, a symphonic poem by the same composer. The text includes a brief history of Stravinsky's life and the genesis of The Nightingale and The Song of the Nightingale. The bulk of the dissertation discusses actual changes employed by Stravinsky (with score examples). Patterns of modifications are identified and discussed as they relate to the composer's change of attitude in orchestration. The analysis focuses on overall patterns of alteration imposed by Stravinsky and their perceived effectiveness achieving a symphonic aural outcome. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2725/
Nihilism and the Formulation of a Philosophy of Art
Nihilism is often associated with feelings of despair, hopelessness and meaningless. It is certainly true that once the implications of this philosophy become apparent that these feelings are valid. However, this reaction is merely the first stage of dealing with nihilism and stopping here fails to examine the various types of nihilism that deal specifically with knowledge, ethics, metaphysics, truth, and art. Nihilism at its base is a philosophy that recognizes the history of human thought and what it means to be and to think. My focus is the way in which a completed nihilism is in fact an emancipatory act and the implications it has for art and the artist in the 21st century. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67991/
Nikos Kazantzakis' View of Womankind
This thesis examines the writings of Nikos Kazantzakis. Primarily the attitude and expressions toward womankind and woman's relationship with man are explored. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130814/
Nine Women in the Fiction of Joseph Conrad
The purpose of this study is to show that many of Conrad's women characters were not merely passive factors and that their inclusion in his fiction was more functional than incidental. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc108139/
The Nineteenth Century Oboe Concertino: An Overview of its Structure with Two Performance Guides
Music written for oboe and orchestra in the nineteenth century falls into three categories: Classical Concerto, Opera Fantasy, and Concertino. The classical, or standard, three movement, sonata-ritornello format was only sparingly used. Instead, composers chose more the experimental forms of the Opera Fantasy and Concertino. The Opera Fantasy was used as a way for oboe players to play popular opera arias of the time, while showcasing their virtuosity and expression. It is in the Concertino where composers expanded the oboe repertoire to its highest form in the nineteenth century, experimenting with structure, and using the oboe to the height of its expressive powers. In addition to discussion on the Concertino in general, performance guides have been provided for two concertinos, Concertino for Oboe and Winds, by Carl Maria von Weber and Concertino for Oboe and Orchestra, Op. 18, by August Klughardt. Information is provided regarding composer biography, compositional/historical perspective, technical and stylistic considerations, and structure. By examining the two very different pieces, one from the beginning of the nineteenth century and one from the end, the evolution of the Concertino can be seen, as well as gaining an understanding of the wide variety of repertoire written for the oboe in the nineteenth century. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3225/
El Niño and health
El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a climate event that originates in the Pacific Ocean but has wide-ranging consequences for weather around the world, and is especially associated with droughts and floods. The irregular occurrence of El Niño and La Niña events has implications for public health. On a global scale, the human effect of natural disasters increases during El Niño. The effect of ENSO on cholera risk in Bangladesh, and malaria epidemics in parts of South Asia and South America has been well established. The strongest evidence for an association between ENSO and disease is provided by time-series analysis with data series that include more than one event. Evidence for ENSO's effect on other mosquito-borne and rodent-borne diseases is weaker than that for malaria and cholera. Health planners are used to dealing with spatial risk concepts but have little experience with temporal risk management. ENSO and seasonal climate forecasts might offer the opportunity to target scarce resources for epidemic control and disaster preparedness. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc226726/
Ninth grade student success: An analysis of a credit recovery program.
The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which a credit recovery program improved the academic success for high school freshmen. For the purpose of this study, academic success was defined as whether or not the student advanced from 9th to 10th grade. A total of 255 students from two junior high schools and one comprehensive high school were included in the study. Independent variables included program, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, TAKS Reading/Language Arts results, and TAKS Mathematics results. A review of related literature provided background information regarding the issues surrounding high school freshmen, dropouts, grade retention, and effective intervention programs. This quantitative study utilized descriptive statistics and logistic regression to analyze the relationship between the independent variables and student success as measured by whether or not the student advanced from ninth to tenth grade. In addition, the study examined the odds of success if participating in the credit recovery program. Sources of data included Incomplete and Failure Listing, Ninth Grade Advisor Listing, Tenth Grade Advisory Listing, and the Student Roster-Fall Collection. The Ninth Grade Success Initiative Program Evaluation for Cycles 6, 7, and 9 provided the individual student results of participation in the program. Levels of significance were set at the .05 level. The findings of this study indicated that no statistically significant relationship existed between participation in the credit recovery program, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, TAKS Reading/Language Arts results, TAKS Mathematics results, and advancing from 9th to 10th grade. It was concluded that further study would be needed to determine the most effective means for providing academic assistance to ninth grade students. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4431/
Ninth-grade Students’ Negotiation Of Aesthetic, Efferent, And Critical Stances In Response To A Novel Set In Afghanistan
This qualitative, action research study was guided by two primary research questions. First, how do students negotiate aesthetic, efferent, and critical stances when reading a novel set in Afghanistan? Second, how do aesthetic and efferent stances contribute to or hinder the adoption of a critical stance? A large body of research exists that examines student responses to literature, and much of that research is based on the transactional theory of reading. However, it remains unclear how critical literacy fits into this theory. This study describes how one group of high school students’ aesthetic and efferent responses to a novel set in Afghanistan supported their development of critical stances. Six students enrolled in a ninth-grade English course participated in this study. Data were collected for 13 weeks. Data included two individual interviews with each student, student writing assignments in the form of 6 assigned journal entries and 7 assigned essays, transcriptions of 12 class discussions, field notes, lesson plans, a teacher researcher journal, and research memos. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Three major findings emerged from this study. First, class discussions provided a context for students to adopt stances that were not evident in their individual written responses to the novel, which were completed prior to the discussions. Second, the discussions provided scaffolding that helped several of the students adopt world-efferent and critical stances. Third, both the aesthetic and the efferent stances contributed to students’ adoption of critical stances. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc103398/
Nitration of Thiophene Analogs of DDT
Since thiophene very often yields compounds that are analogous to benzene derivatives in general physiological properties, it was decided to attempt to prepare the nitro and amino derivatives of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(2-thienyl)-ethane (V) as well as the nitro and amino derivatives of 2,2,3-trichloro-1,1-bis-(2-thienyl)-butane (VI). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163827/
Nitrogen Accretion on a Lacustrine Plain
The purpose of the investigation was to locate the plant population which had the greatest impact on soil nitrogen in a successional sequence from newly deposited alluvia to a mature streamside forest, and to evaluate the pioneer populations in terms of their annual nitrogen contribution. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc163991/
Nitrogen Derivatives of I-phenylazimidoquinone
A series of analogous reactions employing as a nucleus I-phenylazimidoquinone has been investigated by this worker. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc97085/
Nitrogen Derivatives of Naphthoquinone
This thesis investigates nitrogen derivatives of naphthoquinone. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130278/
Nitrogen Derivatives of Naphthoquinone
A series of nitrogen derivatives of 1,4-naphthoquinone, which are structurally similar to the compounds of Hall, has been prepared by this worker. In general, the amido groups are those of the long-chain, fatty acids, and it is believed they will have increased physiological activity. These compounds are to be tested for medicinal activity by Parke-Davis and Company. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130314/
Nitrogen Metabolism of College Women on Self-Selected Diets
The purpose of the present study is to determine the nitrogen intake and output (in both urine and feces) of two groups of Texas college women living in the Home Management House at North Texas State College. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53606/
An NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium and of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates
A 1H, 13C, and 6Li NMR study of 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium indicated that 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium exists only as a hexameric aggregate over the entire temperature range of 25 to - 92.1 ° C in cyclopentane. Reacting 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium with 2-ethyl-1-butanol resulted in alkyllithium/lithium alkoxide mixed aggregates, apparently of the form Ra(RO)bLia+b. A multinuclear, variable temperature NMR study of samples with O:Li ratios of 0.2 and 0.4 showed, in addition to the alkyllithium, the formation of four mixed aggregates, one of them probably an octamer. Higher O:Li ratio samples showed the formation of several other mixed aggregates. Mixing 2-ethyl-1-butyllithium with independently prepared lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide formed the same mixed aggregates formed by in situ synthesis of lithium alkoxide. Lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide also exists as aggregates in cyclopentane. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2807/
An NMR Study of 2-Ethylbutyllithium/Lithium 2-Ethyl-1-butoxide Mixed Aggregates, Lithium Hydride/Lithium 2-Ethyl-1-butoxide Mixed Aggregates, n-Pentyllithium Aggregates, and n-Pentyllithium/Lithium n-Pentoxide Mixed Aggregates
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A 13C and 6Li variable temperature NMR study of 2-ethylbutyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates formed from reacting 2-ethyl-1-butanol with 2-ethylbutyllithium in two O/Li ratios of 0.2/1 and 0.8/1. The 0.2/1 sample resulted in two 2-ethylbutyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates and seven lithium hydride/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates. The lithium hydride mixed aggregates were also studied using selective 1H decoupling experiments. The 0.8/1 sample resulted in six 2-ethylbutyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates and five lithium hydride/lithium 2-ethyl-1-butoxide mixed aggregates. A low temperature 13C NMR spectroscopy study of n-pentyllithium indicated three aggregates, most likely a hexamer, an octamer, and a nonamer. A low temperature 13C NMR study of an 0.2/1 O/Li ratio sample of n-pentyllithium mixed with 1-pentanol resulted in three n-pentyllithium/lithium n-pentoxide aggregates mixed aggregates along with the three n-pentyllithium aggregates. 13C NMR data for this mixture gave inconclusive results whether or not lithium hydride/lithium alkoxide mixed aggregates were present in the sample. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4906/
NMR study of 2-ethylhexyllithium aggregate and 2- ethylhexyllithium/lithium 2-ethyl-1-hexoxide mixed aggregates.
A 1H, 13C, and 6Li NMR study of 2-ethylhexyllithium showed that 2- ethylhexyllithium exists solely as a hexamer in cyclopentane solution over the temperature range from 25 to -65 °C. Furthermore, 2-ethylhexyllithium and lithium 2- ethyl-1-hexoxide were shown to form mixed aggregates when the alkoxide was formed in situ by reacting 2-ethylhexyllithium with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. A multinuclear, variable temperature NMR study of a sample with an O:Li ratio of 0.2 led to the identification of at least four such aggregates, one of which was found to be a hexamer with the composition R5(RO)Li6. Studies of samples with higher O:Li ratios, up to 0.8, showed additional mixed aggregates present. All solutions containing mixed aggregates were also shown to contain hydrocarbon soluble lithium hydride. A study of lithium 2-ethyl-1- hexoxide indicated that it aggregates in solution as well. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3037/
NMR Study of n-Propyllithium Aggregates
A variable temperature 1H, 13C, and 6Li NMR study of n-propyl-6Li-lithium showed five different aggregates, similar to that in the literature as (RLi)n, n= 6, 8, 9, 9, 9. There were also a number of additional new species, identified as lithium hydride containing aggregates. Unexpectedly, a series of 13C{1H} 1-D NMR experiments with selective 6Li decoupling showed evidence for 13C-6Li spin-spin coupling between the previously reported (RLi)n aggregates and various hydride species. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3350/
An NMR Study of Trimethylsilylmethyllithium Aggregates and Mixed Trimethylsilylmethyllithium/Lithium trimethylsilylmethoxide Aggregates
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An NMR spectroscopy study of trimethylsilylmethyllilthium, TMSM-Li, indicates that TMSM-Li exists as two different aggregates in cyclopentane solution. Using previously reported colligative properties of TMSM-Li in different solutions in connection with new 13C and 6Li NMR data collected in this study, aggregation states were assigned as octamer and hexamer. Low temperature 13C and 6Li NMR peak intensities indicated an equilibrium exists between the two aggregates that shifts toward the octamer as the temperature decreases. ΔH was calculated to be 5.23 + 0.15 kcal/mol and ΔS was calculated to be 17.9 + 0.6 eu for the hexamer/octamer equilibrium system. Samples of TMSM-Li were mixed with TMSM-OH in attempts to form mixed alkyllithium/lithium alkoxide aggregates. 13C NMR data for these mixtures gave inconclusive results whether or not these compounds formed, which is different from other primary alkyllithium compounds studied in the past. A study of neopentyllithium, NpLi, indicates only one aggregate in solution with the aggregation state unknown using low temperature 13C NMR spectroscopy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4657/
NNS Use of Adverbs in Academic Writing
Recent studies have begun to redefine the idea of accuracy in second language acquisition to include not only grammatical correctness, but also native-like selection. This is an exploratory study aimed at identifying areas of nonnative-like selection of adverbs, such as sentence position, semantic category preferences, frequency of use and breadth of word choice. Using corpus-linguistic methods it compares the writing of nonnative English speakers at an intermediate and advanced level to both American college students’ writing and published academic writing. It also conducts in-depth case studies of three of the most commonly used adverbs. It finds that while advanced students are grammatically accurate, there are still several ways in which their use of adverbs differs from that of native speakers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84213/
No Child Left Behind
This poster introduces the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on No Child Left Behind. This series features Dr. Jeanne Turks, associate professor for teacher education and administration, Dr. D. Jack Davis, professor emeritus of art education and art history, and Dr. Troy Johnson, UNT's vice provost for enrollment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67595/
No Greater Error: Negotiated Agreements and Their Effects on the Conclusion of Interstate War
Negotiated settlements, formal treaties to unilateral cease-fires, are often accepted to be the preferable method to end war. When negotiated agreements are used in the normal business of international politics they can be potentially helpful devices; however, when they are relied upon for a nation's security or war prevention and conclusion they can prove disastrous. It is the presence of force variables, and not the formality of an agreement which effectively concludes a war. I recategorize success of an agreement to not only mean failure of a return to war, but also whether the tenets of an agreement are actually followed. I utilize a modified version of Fortna's conflict dataset and run three separate logit analyses to test the effectiveness of settlements in a medium n quantitative analysis. If politicians and policy makers realize that it is not treaties that establish peace but the costs of war and military might then perhaps the world will be a more peaceful place. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc177217/
No Longer Under Our Control: The Nature and Role of Standards in the 21st Century Library
This lecture script examines the nature and role of standards for the emerging 21st century library. Given the dynamic character of the networked environment, when are standards appropriate and how can they be developed in a manner consistent with the volatility of information technologies and changing library services? What are the roles and responsibilities of standards developing organizations, technology vendors, content creators, and librarians for standards? Do local practices of libraries threaten standards-based resource sharing and resource access technologies? Can local needs be balanced with broader library community responsibilities, and how do standards affect this balance? The speaker's assumption is that adherence to standards has never been more critical, yet his implementation experience with Z39.50 and MARC suggests that the commitment to national and international standards by librarians, technology vendors, and content creators are often an example of good intentions rather than actual practice. This standards disconnect threatens the emerging 21st century library's ability to deliver fundamental services in appropriate ways to their users. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc36316/
No place to call home: Cultural homelessness, self-esteem and cross-cultural identities.
The study examined relations between a cross-cultural geographically mobile childhood and adult cultural identity, attachment to cross-cultural identities (CCIs) and self-esteem. CCIs are loosely defined identities (e.g., third culture kids [TCKs], military brats, missionary kids) that describe some individuals' childhood cross-cultural experience. The 475 participants spent at least two years before age 18 in a culture different from their parents' and completed an online survey including childhood cross-cultural experiences, Cultural Homelessness Criteria, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, and Self Label Identity Measure (SLIM) that captured strength of affirmation, belonging and commitment to any CCI. Cultural homelessness (CH) was related to lower self-esteem; higher SLIM scores was related to higher self-esteem and lower CH. TCKs reported lower self-esteem than non-TCKs and older participants experienced less CH and higher self-esteem. SLIM scores buffered the CH-self-esteem relationship, whereas a TCK CCI and having more cross-culturally experienced social networks did not. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc10991/
No Place to Hide:: Effects of Climate Change on Protected Areas
This paper considers the potential impacts of climate change on protected areas (PAs) and actions that can be taken to mitigate them. Recent research suggests that the types of environmental changes predicted in climatic models are now taking place. Studies of many animals and plants that show significant alterations in range or behaviour find that the most consistent explanation for these is climate change. These impacts may necessitate a fundamental rethinking in the approach to protection. Protected areas are rooted in the concept of permanence: protection works best as a conservation tool if the area remains protected for the foreseeable future. But under climate change, species for which a particular protected area was established may no longer survive there. Some protected areas - for instance in coastal, arctic and mountain regions - may disappear altogether in their current form. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc226657/
No Slip-Shod Muse: A Performance Analysis of Some of Susanna Centlivre's Plays
In 1982, Richard C. Frushell urged the necessity for a critical study of Susanna Centlivre's plays. Since then, only a handful of books and articles briefly discuss herand many attempt wrongly to force her into various critical models. Drawing on performativity models, my reading of several Centlivre plays (Love's Contrivance, The Gamester, The Basset-Table and A Bold Stroke for a Wife) asks the question, "What was it like to see these plays in performance?" Occupying somewhat uneasy ground between literature and theatre studies, I borrow useful tools from both, to create what might be styled a New Historicist Dramaturgy. I urge a re-examination of the period 1708-28. The standard reading of theatre of the period is that it was static. This "dry spell" of English theatre, most critics agree, was filled with stock characters and predictable plot lines. But it is during this so-called "dry spell" that Centlivre refines her stagecraft, and convinces cautious managers to bank on her work, providing evidence that playwrights of the period were subtly experimenting. The previous trend in scholarship of this cautious and paranoid era of theatre history has been to shy away from examining the plays in any depth, and fall back on pigeonholing them. But why were the playwrights turning out the work that they did? What is truly representative of the period? Continued examination may stop us from calling the period a "dry spell." For that purpose, examining some of Centlivre's early work encourages us to avoid the tendency to study only a few playwrights of the period, and to avoid the trap of focusing on biography rather than text. I propose a different kind of aesthetic, stemming from my interest in the text as precursor to performance. Some of these works may not seem fertile ground for theorists, but discarding them on that basis fails to take into account their original purpose: to entertain. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2524/
No-thought Shopping: Understanding and Controlling Nonconscious Processing in Marketing
This dissertation explores how nonconscious thought processing might be affected and activated in ways that influence consumer decision making. To activate nonconscious thought processes, this dissertation relies on priming—the unobtrusive activation of mental representations by stimuli in a social context, which occurs without participants' conscious awareness. Three dimensions of consumer decision making are investigated: purchase intention, product evaluation and arousal. The dissertation is based on the auto-motive model of nonconscious goal pursuit and somatic marker hypothesis. The dissertation is driven by three experiments, which respectively explore crucial areas in priming effects and addresses the following research question: can primes be shaped or controlled by marketers? Specifically, the dissertation examines whether shopping behavior can be primed. Second, the dissertation also examines how facial primes displaying basic emotions (happiness, anger, contempt, disgust, fear, sadness, and surprise) can prime emotion and arousal. Finally the dissertation examines the effect of the interaction of the buying prime with the primes of faces displaying basic emotions on the dependent variables of purchase intention, product evaluation, emotion, and arousal. Results from three experimental studies show that shopping behavior can be primed, and primed participants will exhibit higher product evaluation than those exposed to a control prime. Second while exposing participants to primes of faces displaying emotions did not elicit those emotions, the priming with faces did reveal a marginal activation of arousal in the participants. Third priming with faces was not found to interact with primed buying behavior such that the interaction would affect the level of arousal. The results indicate that Bargh's auto-motive model of nonconscious goal pursuit can be applied to marketing. Thus priming shopping behavior can affect product evaluation though the effect of this prime appears to be too weak to be applied in the field. Priming with faces was found not to interact with primed shopping behavior and thus affect product evaluation. The impact of the findings on marketing practitioners suggests that more laboratory investigation is necessary. Further laboratory investigation should be used to raise the effect level of the prime and to find ways to shape and control nonconscious goal pursuit prior to attempting to bring priming into the field. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271812/
No Title IX in Journalism: An Analysis of Subject Gender in Newspaper Sports Columns
The purpose of this study is to examine gender bias in sports media from the perspective of the sports columnist. The research analyzed 1,082 sports columns written by ten columnists (five male, five female) at newspapers across the United States. The columns were scrutinized to determine if the column subject was male or female. Results found that 84.4% of the sports columns were written about male athletes or men's sports compared to only 9% devoted to female athletes and women's sports. The research also found that female sports columnists write about female sports 12.7% of the time, while male sports columns only dedicate 6% of their columns to female athletes or women's sports. Newspapers with a larger circulation were more likely to have sports columns about female sports than were newspapers with smaller readerships. Six of the columnists were then interviewed to get their opinions on gender issues in sports journalism. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12086/
No Way Out: A Historical Documentary
No Way Out: A Historical Documentary is the written companion to a forty-minute documentary film entitled "No Way Out". The film deals with a 1974 inmate standoff at a prison in Huntsville, Texas known as the Carrasco Incident. The film examines the prison takeover through the eyes of those who lived through it. Composed of five interviews, "No Way Out" is a compilation of various points of view ranging from former hostages, members of the press, and law enforcement. The written companion for this piece discusses the three phases of the production for this film. These chapters are designed to share with the reader the various intricacies of documentary filmmaking. The thesis also explores theoretical issues concerning collective memory, coping behavior, and the ethics of historical documentary filmmaking. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4320/
NOAA Makes New Tree Ring Data Available
New data from tree rings from 500 sites around the world are now available from NOAA. These data are important because they provide climate scientists and resource managers with records of past climatic variability extending back thousands of years. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12016/
NOAA Reports Potent Greenhouse Gas Levels Off
This document provides a summary of a study by NOAA researchers and National Institute for Space Research in the Netherlands. According to the study, one of the atmosphere's most potent greenhouse gases, methane, may now have leveled off. Scientists aren't sure yet if this "leveling off" is just a temporary pause in two centuries of increase or a new state of equilibrium. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12014/
NOAA Sets the El Niño Prediction Straight
El Niño is an abnormal warming of the ocean temperatures across the eastern tropical Pacific that affects weather around the globe. El Niño episodes usually occur approximately every four-five years. NOAA researchers and scientists are presently monitoring the formation of a possible weak El Niño and predict that the United States could experience very weak-to-marginal impacts late winter to early spring 2002. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12015/
NOAA Updates What Defines Normal Temperature
Normal temperatures and precipitation levels for your area may have changed as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center recently released new 'normal' data for about 8,000 weather stations. The data defines the normal temperature at locations across the United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and U.S. Pacific Islands. These data are used as a benchmark for weather forecasters to calculate day-to-day temperature and rainfall departures from typical levels and are also used by business, government and industry for planning, design and operations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11976/
Nobody's Fool: A Study of the Yrodivy in Boris Godunov
Modest Musorgsky completed two versions of his opera Boris Godunov between 1869 and 1874, with significant changes in the second version. The second version adds a concluding lament by the fool character that serves as a warning to the people of Russia beyond the scope of the opera. The use of a fool is significant in Russian history and this connection is made between the opera and other arts of nineteenth-century Russia. These changes are, musically, rather small, but historically and socially, significant. The importance of the people as a functioning character in the opera has precedence in art and literature in Russia in the second half of the nineteenth-century and is related to the Populist movement. Most importantly, the change in endings between the two versions alters the entire meaning of the composition. This study suggests that this is a political statement on the part of the composer. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2242/
Noctilucent
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This dissertation is composed of two parts. Part I discusses the evolution of meditative poetry as a genre, with a particular emphasis on the influence of women poets and feminist critical theory. Part II is a collection of poems. Although several popular and critically-acclaimed poets working today write meditative poems, meditative poetry as a genre has not been systematically examined since M.H. Abrams’s essay on the meditative mode in Romantic poetry, “Structure and Style in the Greater Romantic Lyric.” Because one of the driving forces of meditative poetry is a longing for, or recognition of, a state of perception that lies between individual being and some form of universal ordering principle, meditative poetry might seem to be antithetical to a postmodern world that is fragmentary, contingent, and performative; indeed, earlier definitions of meditative poetry, tied to historical and cultural understandings of the individual and the Universal, no longer reflect “how we know” but only “how we knew.” However, this essay argues that there is a contemporary meditative structure that allows for a continued relationship between the individual and the Universal without resorting to the essentialism implicit in the genre as traditionally described. This new structure owes much to feminist theory, in particular écriture féminine, which models a method for recovery of self in language that would seek to efface it. In order to expose the boundaries of the contemporary meditative mode, and to outline its relationship to écriture féminine, this essay analyzes meditative poems from four contemporary poets: Kay Ryan, Jorie Graham, Linda Gregerson, and Linda Bierds, and contrasts contemporary variations on the genre with earlier traditions, identifying an evolved form that better reflects a postmodern rhetoric. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc103295/